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Author Topic: Moving hives in winter  (Read 654 times)

Offline Bob Wilson

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Moving hives in winter
« on: May 27, 2023, 10:19:50 pm »
I know the old rule of moving hives three feet or three (or two) miles.
I know the trick of hanging a leafy branch over an entrance to get them to reorient.
However what about moving a hive to the other side of a yard in winter, when the bees are inside for a week of bad weather? Would that trigger reorientation?
And what about putting a nuc through a paper combine? Would they reorient by the time they chewed through and exited the hive, or would the nuc bees go back to their original place in the yard?

Offline BeeMaster2

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Re: Moving hives in winter
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2023, 07:37:13 am »
Bob,
In both instances, just put a palm frond in front of your he entrance and they will reorient to the new location. If there are no hives in the old location they will go back to the new location. You will probably see bees buzzing the the old location for a couple of weeks.
I have moved them 6? before and they flew a s pattern for over two weeks. They come in full speed and then remember that the hive is moved and then fly to it.
Jim Altmiller
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Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Moving hives in winter
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2023, 02:13:23 pm »
I agree with Jim.  I have had rather good results when having to relocate hives to another nearby location by placing a large obstruction (e.g. palm frond, or similar) at their entrance--a big and bold obstruction to really get the memo across.  The closest move that I have done with this method is approx 50-60 feet.  The residual bees that didn't "get the memo" and insisted on returning and permanently staying at the old hive location was rather minimal.  The worst was ~150-200 while most only had several dozen on average.  If you get a large cluster that didn't get the memo, leave them an empty drawn frame to settle on and bring them back to the new location and drop them in while the obstruction is still in place...more of them will catch on, reducing the lost number.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Moving hives in winter
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2023, 12:19:01 am »
Quote
However what about moving a hive to the other side of a yard in winter, when the bees are inside for a week of bad weather? Would that trigger reorientation?
And what about putting a nuc through a paper combine? Would they reorient by the time they chewed through and exited the hive, or would the nuc bees go back to their original place in the yard?

Bob in my location the bees might not leave the hive for a month or so at a time in the Winter months due to 'cold'. I think your question is a good question considering location which Winter may make that difference you seek?? I would not be scared to try it if I knew the weather would hold them in for as much as a month at a time. After such a long time they would 'probably' reorientate anyway when they did come out for a cleansing flight?  Now, this is only speculation on my part as I have not moved hives any distance in Cold winter weather.. Plus Im not sure what the Weather is like in your location.
I know that Jurassic and Beemaster2 are in warmer climates than am I, and I would readily agree with their replies 'if' my location/climate was similar to theirs.. To be clear, I am not disagreeing now, just speculating according to my location what the results may be...

Phillip
2 Chronicles 7:14
14 If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.

Offline Bill Murray

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Re: Moving hives in winter
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2023, 04:06:52 pm »
Bob, if you not worried about loosing field bees move them anywhere and everywhere in the apiary you want.