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Author Topic: Queen rearing and royal jelly  (Read 227 times)

Offline Charles Wright

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Queen rearing and royal jelly
« on: January 11, 2021, 08:10:18 pm »
Can I buy royal jelly to feed my Queens? And if so where do I find it at and what am I looking for that I buy that is for Queen rearing and not for human consumption? Thanks guys I love this forum. So it would be better if

Online van from Arkansas

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Re: Queen rearing and royal jelly
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2021, 10:20:56 pm »
Mr. Wright, good evening to you Sir.  Queen rearing is my passion, my eyes still sparkle every time I see a queen hatch.  I natural breed, wet graft or instrumental inseminate my queens.

You question regarding royal jelly (RJ) makes me think you correctly learned a well fed queen is superior.  Therefore, a queen rearing beek can add RJ and produce better queens...  The more food the better, right?  The idea has merit however there are concerns you should know about which I will discuss in the next paragraph.

Not all royal jelly is the same.  The nurse bees change the chemistry of RJ as the queen ages, prior to capping.  Most queens I raise have left over RJ in the queen cell after departure.  So the amount of RJ in the queen cell is not a limiting factor.  Also there is the issue of adding the RJ to a queen cell without disrupting the breathing holes located on the sides of larva, the entire length of the larva.  These are tiny holes and if a larva is rolled, or coated with RJ, the larva will suffocate because it takes time to open and close the breathing tubes.

If you wish to raise the best quality queens then focus on the nurse bees.  The nurse bees are the ones needing food as they make the RJ in their head ,, of all places.  Yes, in their head.  Lots of nurse bees, with frames of pollen and honey then the nurse bees will take the best of care your queens.  When I raise queens, I loc up my nurse bees, screened entrance shut, without larva to feed for 24 hours.  Then, after 24 hours, I provide the queen larva to the nurse bees while the nurses are all full of RJ and just waiting for a larva to feed.

There are many factors to raising queens inwhich entire books are written.  So with this topic, your topic, we are limiting to the subject to royal jelly.

Cheers
Van
I have been around bees a long time, since birth.  I am a hobbyist so my answers often reflect this fact.  I concentrate on genetics, raise my own queens by wet graft, nicot, with natural or II breeding.  I do not sell queens, I will give queens  for free but no shipping.

Offline beesnweeds

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Re: Queen rearing and royal jelly
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2021, 10:42:47 pm »
Can I buy royal jelly to feed my Queens?

Check out "Busting Queen Grafting Myths" on page 187. February 2020 American Bee Journal
Everyone loves a worker.... until its laying.

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Queen rearing and royal jelly
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2021, 08:51:13 am »
I tried to find a link. This is the closest I could get to the article:
Busting Queen Grafting Myths
Nissa S. Coit, Gehrig R. Loughran, Elina L. Ni?o ? 187

If anyone has a direct link, please post it.
Jim Altmiller

Offline Charles Wright

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Re: Queen rearing and royal jelly
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2021, 09:07:38 am »
Thanks guys. Based on what you said Super I think I'm gonna do what you said and focus on the nurse bees. Thanks y'all.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Queen rearing and royal jelly
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2021, 12:58:35 pm »
You want the starter especially to be overflowing with nurse bees.  I have the best luck with a starter box or what is sometimes called a swarm box.  You put some nectar and bee bread in there and some water soaked sponges in the bottom and shake it full of bees from brood comb.  Then you graft.  If the larvae you are grafting from don't have a lot of royal jelly, then put them in the starter box for an hour.  Then graft.  Then put the grafted cells in the starter.  The nurse bees there were nursing larvae an hour ago and are desperate to use the royal jelly in their hypopharyngeal glands so they feed the queens lavishly.  I put the starter in the basement and water them again the next day.  Two days in the starter and the larvae are lavishly fed and well started.  Then I put them in the finisher.  I have done other methods and they can work, but this is the most reliable.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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