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Author Topic: Honey warming cabinet.  (Read 280 times)

Offline Skeggley

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Honey warming cabinet.
« on: July 18, 2020, 10:41:21 pm »
Hi all, in my area I have nectar sources that are glucose rich which causes the honey to crystallise as soon as the temperatures drop. I don?t treat or filter the honey at all which doesn?t help. Personally I have no issue with eating this honey however and impress on the customers that it?s a natural process and doesn?t affect the honey, I would rather move the honey in a liquid state as it?s more presentable and somewhat easier to pour into jars, so I have thrown together a warming cabinet using materials from what I have on hand. (Free)
I?d like some clarification on a few things as it can get a bit grey when researching so am throwing some questions to those in the know. :grin:
Temperatures. What is the safe temperature to decrystallise honey and once decrystallised what is the minimum temperature to maintain the honey in the liquid state? Keeping in mind I have different sized containers in the same cabinet ranging from 20 kgs to 300 gms so they will change state at different rates. I have some tamper proof tubs which I cannot open to stir. I am also planning to put honey frames in so prefer not to melt the wax...
Heating. Currently I?ve a light globe set up but am also wondering if the light from the light will affect the honey.
It does seem that the honey I have experimented with so far seems to have changed to a darker colour at 40?C.
Thanks in advance.


Offline cao

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2020, 01:31:59 am »
I have a warming cabinet that I warm jars.  I have it set a little below 104*F(40*C).  It can take several weeks to completely liquefy some of the stubborn honey.  I have also noticed that the honey will darken some with the extended heat time.  As far as frames, I would say that you could have the heat a little less for them. Hope this helps a little.

Offline FloridaGardener

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2020, 11:43:29 am »
I have used a crock pot (ceramic slow cooker) with water, And immersed bottles, as a double boiler setup. My crystallization problem may come from pollen grains in crush-and-strain.  I just might devote all that honey to creamed honey which is really popular once someone tries it.

 ?Warm? Setting on a crockpot is about 170-180 degrees and will kill honey enzymes though.  The ?keep warm? setting is about 140 F.  If you have a temperature  gun, and are checking back you can keep an eye on it.
 
   Or if you have a large soup pot, and a temp gun, and a rack to keep the bottles off the bottom, this could be done on a stove top.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2020, 01:07:21 pm by FloridaGardener »

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2020, 01:48:08 pm »
FG,
140 is way to high to take your honey to. You might as well call it store bought honey.
As mentioned, I never heat my honey over 104F, 40C. There are designs hear on BeeMaster for a very good honey heating cabinet. I have built 2 of them, one for me and one for a friend, and they handle a wide range of containers, all the different bottles, 3 and 5 gallon buckets and frames.
I will see if I can locate the designs and add a link.
Jim Altmiller

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2020, 01:52:30 pm »
Here is the link from when I was looking to build it for Jim Barry.
https://beemaster.com/forum/index.php?topic=45570.msg393404#msg393404

Jim Altmiller

Offline Skeggley

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2020, 11:02:05 pm »
Ok, thanks peeps, so to clarify, 40?C (104?F) is the best temp to liquify crystallised honey without degrading it?
Once liquified what is the lowest temp to maintain liquidity?
Currently I?m using a light globe and am wondering if the light degrades the honey. In warmer weather I use the dash of my car to liquify (and advertise :wink:) and the colour seems to be maintained but am curious as to whether a heat mat would be a better heat source.
Thanks again.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2020, 12:03:32 am »
This may not be exactly what you are looking for Skeggley it might help?

For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline crmauch

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2020, 06:50:33 pm »
I honestly know nothing about this, but you might want to consider a plant/seedling heating mat.  There's different models out there and I know they don't all heat the same.   But if they were much hotter than the temperatures you're discussing, it would fry the seedlings.
Chris

Offline Skeggley

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2020, 12:25:38 am »
Hi mate, yeah looked into propagation mats however temps too low unfortunately, 35⁰C max. Keg warmers another option but will probably stick to shielded globes and run 2 for redundancy.
I'm thinking 20⁰C as a maintain temp?

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2020, 11:21:53 am »
Build your cabinet. Add an InkBird PID controller, run the wiring to your heating source inside your sealed cabinet, along with an attached thermal coupler running into your sealed cabinet. You can demand a steady inside temperature to what ever temperature your desire.
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2020, 12:16:54 am »
I use the thermostats that are in hot water heaters. The large ones have two thermostats and some one always has one out for the trash, so they are free. I find they are very accurate especially in the 100 degree range (40 degrees Celsius).
Be sure to use black electrical tape over the contacts.
Jim Altmiller

Offline Dabbler

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2020, 04:31:55 pm »
I will second Jim's recommendation for using the water heater thermostats.

I broke down and purchased a new one but it wasn't expensive. Works well for 2 -3 years now.
Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the tests first, the lessons afterwards .
-Vernon Sanders Law

Offline Skeggley

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2020, 09:55:22 pm »
Cabinet and temperature control isn?t an issue, more so the heat source factors and the maintain temp once liquified.



Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2020, 10:22:14 pm »
My heater uses a 150 bulb. It easily handles the heat requirements of this job. I have used a 75 watt bulb but that is bare minimum and requires extra blankets it add insulation to keep more heat in.
Jim Altmiller

Offline FloridaGardener

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Re: Honey warming cabinet.
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2020, 10:16:52 pm »
Yep, I've got to qualify the crock pot concept.

1- it was a warning that they actually get very hot.

2- Just like frozen chicken in a pot of hot water thaws out but doesn't cook, a glass bottle of honey left for a few minutes in  140 degree water will warm up, and if it's removed before the complete thermal transfer, it will never get as hot as the water.

3 - I think I did mention the temp gun to keep it under 105 F. 

I have some high-glucose honey too, so sweet it will make you teeth hurt.  I've been working my way through 15 solidified pounds of it, by adding superfine organic saigon cinnamon, running it through the Ninja blender, and making creamed honey.  The blender chops the larger crystals, the cinnamon acts as a starter, and it re-sets with a very smooth texture.