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Author Topic: Cut-down split  (Read 1043 times)

Offline Duane

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Re: Cut-down split
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2020, 04:35:17 pm »
On one split I had left a frame with multiple queen cells in, I soon noticed cells with about a dozen eggs in it.  So multiple cells don't guarantee it.  I added a frame of open brood, then a day or two later, found another hive with queen cells.  I added a frame with cells and a few days later saw the cells were still intact.  Can that work out, do the bees with the added frame protect the cells from the other bees?
I found the added queen cell tore up.  And multiple eggs in nearby cells.  Yesterday, 6 days later, and several weeks before the frame of brood would have a queen producing eggs, I had a swarm in a tree.  Figuring a queen in the bush is worth more than hoping against laying workers, I was going to do a shake out, and hive the swarm.  I was checking again and noticed single eggs laid in the proper position.  Trying to look closer, I was blowing on the bees trying to get them out of the way, and there was the queen!  So don't know what happened, but decided I'd let them be.

About 15 minutes later, before I would have finished the shake out, I heard the swarm take off.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Cut-down split
« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2020, 06:14:00 pm »
...
I have modified to show you my reserve of 300 built, (foundation-less brood frames), with starter strips ready to go. When I get low I simply put more together and restock.

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That is quite a stock of frames Phillip! ... is it my imagination, or did you go from "Zero" to "100" in keeping bees - in record time? :cheesy: :cool:

Nicely done!

Thanks Alan, I have had a lot of good help for a lot good folks like you all here.

I just looked back and realized that I made a typo error. What I meant to say is :Thanks Alan, I have had a lot of good help FROM a lot good folks like you all here.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2020, 09:22:39 am by Ben Framed »
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Cut-down split
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2020, 07:58:47 pm »
I have modified to show you my reserve of 300 built, (foundation-less brood frames), with starter strips ready to go. When I get low I simply put more together and restock.
I also use foundation-less frames.  I no longer can find the ones from kelley bees that are made for foundationless.  The current ones I got elsewhere, I am using their wedge to turn sideways.  Tedious and time consuming.  What type of frames do you use and how do you make the starter strips?  I'd like to get solid bottom boards to prevent the hive beetles from lurking there, but had never found any that way.

Duane I build deep frames from scratch. I always put a groove down the center of the top bar from side bar to side bar. That way I can insert plastic foundation for honey frames or use starter strips for foundation less brood frames. For brood frames, I simply rip strips to fit the top bar groove on my table saw. From there I use a 23 gage air nailer (pin nailer) adding a little glue in the groove, put the ripped strip in place and pin nail. Rigid and there to stay without cracking bar or strip.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2020, 09:16:16 am by Ben Framed »
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline Duane

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Re: Cut-down split
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2020, 07:16:46 pm »
Only suggestion I have is get ready to buy a queen. I have never found a better way to kill a good hive than removing all or most of the swarm cells. They make several because they know success is not 100%. 
Ok, yesterday, I see a swarm in the air which landed in the trees.  I noticed one box had a lot more activity than other boxes.  Later, I see less bees hanging out on the front.  Today, I go in and see less bees and find multiple capped queen cells with about three that had hatched out.  10 days ago, I had checked on them and they still had several frames of space available, of which they still do.  This hive, with queen, just happened to come from the mentioned one I had split off before.  It's almost like they planned on swarming and swarm they did.

So, what is happening, what is going to happen here.  Multiple capped cells, several hatched.  Is this a case where I should have removed all but one, or are they waiting to make sure the virgin queen comes back mated and will see that the rest are destroyed?  Have multiple swarms already left with the multiple hatched cells?

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Cut-down split
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2020, 03:40:48 pm »
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin