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What is your opinion about bee stings?

I try to avoid ALL bee stings
11 (27.5%)
I sometimes purposely allow myself to be stung
2 (5%)
I believe stings build resistance
7 (17.5%)
I do NOT believe stings build resistance
3 (7.5%)
I alway wear gloves
5 (12.5%)
I sometimes wear gloves
6 (15%)
I rarely or never wear gloves
6 (15%)

Total Members Voted: 17

Voting closed: June 15, 2020, 12:22:42 am

Author Topic: Bee stings  (Read 742 times)

Offline van from Arkansas

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2020, 09:16:41 pm »
I just got stung under the eye yesterday and thinking about throwing in the towel.  This hive is so unpredictable.  One minute it is gentle as a lamb and next they are killer bees.  If this is the norm for southern FL I have to give it up.

Give up the bees????  Ace, you gonna join the NRA too, then vote for that guy with the Red...  Trying to make a point, with humor intended.

I remember when you caught the swarm, last Spring that moved into your equipment.  Mr. Ace, you were excited, thrilled you were...

Van
I have been around bees a long time, since birth.  I am a hobbyist so my answers often reflect this fact.  I concentrate on genetics, raise my own queens by wet graft, nicot, with natural or II breeding.  I do not sell queens, I will give queens  for free but no shipping.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2020, 09:28:42 am »
Are you wearing a veil?
Not mowing the lawn.  I pretty much wasn't wearing anything but a pair of shorts.
Van, I was excited.  Still would be if I could count on local genetics.  I don't think I can.
Buying a queen would be a solution up north.  Down here I'm not to sure.  There is a problem of acceptance and the fact that the queen might be replaced in a short time.  BTW my eye is perfectly fine now.  My wife would not fare as well.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline van from Arkansas

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2020, 09:16:04 pm »
Glad you eye is better.  Ace, are you saying there is a difference in the northern bee you raised compared to these southern bees, relative to queen acceptance/supersedure?  Do to different climates, flow etc?  I believe you were in New York area and now Florida, talk about environmental change, well,  you have experience it.  From snow man to sand man, from winter cluster to year round foragers.

Elaborate for me, Ace, this is very interesting regarding the bees with aggression/calm behavior!!!!

I have been around bees a long time, since birth.  I am a hobbyist so my answers often reflect this fact.  I concentrate on genetics, raise my own queens by wet graft, nicot, with natural or II breeding.  I do not sell queens, I will give queens  for free but no shipping.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2020, 09:54:47 am »
Don't get me wrong, we have testy bees in the north but very little africanized genetics.  They only get there by packages and because of their behavior don't winter well.  There is also a desire to exterminate them.
BTW I mowed the lawn near the hive with a hand mower yesterday.  Then I ran the tractor over that area to get past the hive.  No problem what so ever.  The only thing I can imagine is that the dang coco nuts float out of the ground because of all the rain and the shrapnel took out some bees and that set them off.  So for the moment I am keeping the hive.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline Acebird

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2020, 10:10:34 am »
Ace, are you saying there is a difference in the northern bee you raised compared to these southern bees, relative to queen acceptance/supersedure?
Not really but...
If you are buying a queen then there is usually a problem with the hive.  The queen gets blamed for problems in the hive so it is not uncommon for the queen to be replaced after she initially gets accepted.  I remember a time back that there were complaints of queens being superseded shortly after being introduced.  I also think if the hive is truly africanized it will be harder to get the queen accepted that she won't be replaced.  That might be the only difference between the two areas.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline Bushman

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #25 on: Today at 03:46:50 pm »
I was doing a quick check before vacation to see if the bees were working the new super I had added and so I popped the outer cover, saw a few bees, no big deal and no high pitched buzzing.

I popped the inner cover and there were a lot of bees on the new undrawn frames and within 2 seconds the buzz pitch went up and they came out.

I got nailed twice on the forearm and once on the shin.  I was not wearing any protection.

I quickly ran back to the garage and suite up and put the covers back on but boy oh boy did my arm and leg swell.  Painful to the touch for a couple days.

I came back from vacation, suited up and tried to do a full hive inspection but once I got past the 2 supers and into the upper brood box I heard the high pitched buzz and they came out in force again.  One got me right on the knuckle through my gloves.

I smoked the glove and walked away for a minute and then came back and put the hive back together.

Up until now they have been very peaceful.

I'm wondering if they will sting through my bee-suit if i persist on the inspection.  I need to check for mites too.

Offline yes2matt

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Re: Bee stings
« Reply #26 on: Today at 03:51:03 pm »
I was doing a quick check before vacation to see if the bees were working the new super I had added and so I popped the outer cover, saw a few bees, no big deal and no high pitched buzzing.

I popped the inner cover and there were a lot of bees on the new undrawn frames and within 2 seconds the buzz pitch went up and they came out.

I got nailed twice on the forearm and once on the shin.  I was not wearing any protection.

I quickly ran back to the garage and suite up and put the covers back on but boy oh boy did my arm and leg swell.  Painful to the touch for a couple days.

I came back from vacation, suited up and tried to do a full hive inspection but once I got past the 2 supers and into the upper brood box I heard the high pitched buzz and they came out in force again.  One got me right on the knuckle through my gloves.

I smoked the glove and walked away for a minute and then came back and put the hive back together.

Up until now they have been very peaceful.

I'm wondering if they will sting through my bee-suit if i persist on the inspection.  I need to check for mites too.
Are you smoking the hive (like in thru the entrance) before you start opening it up or are you waiting til they're wound up already?

How is your nectar flow? Bees are much more testy in a dearth.

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