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Author Topic: Smoked salt  (Read 248 times)

Offline JurassicApiary

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Smoked salt
« on: May 28, 2020, 05:20:10 pm »
Made a batch of smoked salt for Father?s Day gifts. It?s something I make a few times a year on our homestead. Simple, although for best results it needs to be turned frequently. I smoke it for 12 hours using a pellet tube in my BBQ and turn the salt every 30 minutes.  I use compressed wood pellets as they?re easy to get in a variety of woods here. My favorite is Alder. If you?ve never had smoked salt before, it smells amazing and adds an earthy-smokey taste to food.  I smoke coarse grained salt for food prep and fine salt for use on the table.


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Online The15thMember

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2020, 05:26:21 pm »
I have never heard of smoked salt.  So you just use it anywhere you'd use normal salt, but it just gives extra smokey flavor?  What are some good applications?
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Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2020, 06:00:02 pm »
I have never heard of smoked salt.  So you just use it anywhere you'd use normal salt, but it just gives extra smokey flavor?  What are some good applications?

Yep.  The coarse grained smoked salt is great for seasoning soups and broths while the fine smoked table salt is great with chicken, pork ribs (heck anything BBQ) and steak.  Different woods blend better with different foods.  I've done salts using Alder (my favorite), Maple, Cherry and Hickory, as well as blends of those too.  Planning to try Mesquite and Apple this summer.  Some of these work better with poultry while others with fish, pork or beef.  Hence, you can end up with a variety of flavors to suit your taste.  I keep Alder smoked salt on my dining table as my go-to.  It's very aromatic and yet despite the intense smoke aroma, the flavor is more on the subtle side.  If you want intense smoke flavor, smoke the meat itself or use liquid smoke, but this is a nice condiment variation that can be made at home by anyone and makes great gifts.  I even sell jars of it at local fairs and pop-up markets on occasion.  Most people have never heard of it, but once they smell it, they fall in love.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2020, 08:20:37 am »
I never heard of smoke salt either but I can't stand liquid smoke.
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Offline Seeb

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2020, 08:38:02 am »
Sounds like something I need to try.

Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2020, 12:39:35 pm »
I never heard of smoke salt either but I can't stand liquid smoke.

I myself am not a big fan of liquid smoke.  I usually smoke meat right on the grill with the pellet tube.  But the smoked salt...I enjoy thoroughly.  Very aromatic, yet subtle because you can't use a large amount due to it being salt.

Online Ben Framed

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2020, 12:35:32 pm »
I never heard of smoke salt either but I can't stand liquid smoke.

I am not crazy about liquid smoke either but this idea sounds good.





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« Last Edit: May 30, 2020, 01:17:00 pm by Ben Framed »
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Online sawdstmakr

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2020, 06:15:58 pm »
It definitely sounds interesting. How thick is the layer of salt when you do it. It sounds like you put the salt in a metal pan. Is that correct.
Jim Altmiller

Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2020, 01:27:01 pm »
Jim, you are correct. I fill a large baking pan with about 1/2-3/4? of salt depending on how much I want to make. I have one photo I happen to take showing the pan that I will attach. This was a large batch so I actually had one pan on the upper rack and one on the main grill surface.
If you have an upper rack in your grill, I suggest resting the pan on that as the smoke being warm will rise and be at its greatest density higher inside the grill. I stir the salt every 30 minutes to mix it up and ensure all of the salt gets exposed thoroughly. After about 3 hours the salt will begin to brown/darken. I also mist the salt periodically with water (hot heavily) just lightly. This moisture will also capture smoke, which will remain when it evaporates. After smoking, it how the pan in the oven to dry out any moisture before canning. Lastly, I can the salt in 4oz mason jars, baking them for one hour (known as dry canning) and immediately seal them upon removal from the oven. As they cool, the lid will vacuum seal down.


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Online Ben Framed

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Re: Smoked salt
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2020, 11:58:17 pm »
Jurassic thank you for sharing this. I bet this is going to make some real good Memphis Bar-be-Que !!
 :wink:
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.