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Author Topic: How long for a hatching queen to mate and start laying eggs?  (Read 504 times)

Offline Jay P

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How long for a hatching queen to mate and start laying eggs?
« on: March 03, 2020, 02:22:10 pm »
Hi again everyone I just opened a hive that had recently swarmed that I missed the chance to catch them before they swarmed. But I did have a queen cell that was capped in another hive so I detached the queen cell from the frame and put it in the queenless hive and i just today saw the queen chewing her way threw the cell cap and had her head sticking out. My question is when should she go out on a mating flight and how will I know when she has? Also how long till I should start seeing eggs?

Offline iddee

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Re: How long for a hatching queen to mate and start laying eggs?
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2020, 02:30:27 pm »
Today is day 16. She will begin laying between day 21 and day 35. On average, she will be laying by day 28. Do NOT open the hive again until day 30. Then look for eggs or larva. If found, immediately close the hive for 2 more weeks. Then you can treat it as a normal hive.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*

Offline Jay P

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Re: How long for a hatching queen to mate and start laying eggs?
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2020, 02:41:07 pm »
Awesome this is my second queen I will have raised this year I am looking forward to them both laying the first queen hasn't started laying yet so I wasn't sure on how long I should give her thank you though this is very helpful.

Offline TheHoneyPump

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How long for a hatching queen to mate and start laying eggs?
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2020, 09:18:46 pm »
She will follow her own rules and timeline.  Generally what we know is as follows:

- If you see her chewing to get out, she will be out walking around within the hour.
- She will spend approximately 3 days roaming around inside the hive appearing to not be doing much. Basically, she's  exploring the reaches of the hive, checking brood status of each comb, and hunting down any other Qcells or queens.  The larger the hive, the more combs, the longer it takes her to complete this stage.  Small hives, nucs, may only take her a day.  Large hives will take her longer, obviously.
- She will then hang out on a frame near the entrance waiting for a nice warm day to be ushered out by an entourage of bees for her orientation flights and mating flights.  Look for warm calm days above 22 deg C ( 71 F). She may go out cooler and overcast, but only if she has to.  She will go out mid-afternoon 2pm-ish.  Stay away from the hive so as to not confuse her safe return on any orientation flights and return flights.
- After a good mating day, she will spend 24 to 48 hours processing. The bees will be vigoursly grooming and massaging her abdomen during this time.  Again, stay out of the hive as disturbances may change beehaviour from massaging to balling.
- On the 4th day after a good mating flight day, there will be eggs.
- If she doesn't feel sufficiently satisfied, she may take additional mating flights.  Those additional mating flights will be before she starts laying.  Once she starts laying, she will never leave the hive again.   ....  unless she is dead and tossed or she is swarming away. 

Keep a calendar so you know when you have to stay away and when is safe to be curiously disruptive.

14 to 17 days from Egg laid to a walking queen
20 to 22 days from egg laid to a flying mating queen
25 to 30 days from egg laid to a mated laying queen, eggs

Patience and minimal looky-loos
Hope that helps!
THP
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 01:46:58 pm by TheHoneyPump »
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