Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Follow the bloom 2020  (Read 4370 times)

Offline retsofmit

  • New Bee
  • *
  • Posts: 6
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #60 on: September 13, 2020, 07:00:44 pm »
Central TX and mid september we have goldenrod and ragweed blooming now.  Also been blooming a few weeks or longer, but Bonesets and asters are on as well.

Offline Nock

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 574
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #61 on: September 22, 2020, 07:17:39 pm »
[ You are not allowed to view attachments ]
The buckwheat I planted in summer went to seed. I bushhogged and worked ground for fall food plots. It came back voluntarily. It will be good till frost.   

Offline sawdstmakr

  • Global Moderator
  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 11481
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #62 on: September 22, 2020, 08:41:34 pm »
I have golden rod and Spanish Needle growing on my farm.
Jim Altmiller

Offline charentejohn

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #63 on: October 01, 2020, 07:23:53 pm »
Central France and most monoculture crops gone now, no real garden plants.  Started in May with lime trees, OSR then more recently sunflowers, ended a few weeks ago.   Ivy flowering so that should see them ok for a while.
What I don't get is where they forage.  At the moment I have Ivy nearby and not a bee on it but they are coming back fully loaded with dark gold pollen so they are finding it somewhere.  They mostly go in the same direction which is ouut accross a field and into woodland with a small stream through it, about 1km (1/2 mile) away.
I know they feed from trees but still can't guess where they find it all, but they do.
You must be the change you want to see in the world - Mahatma Gandhi

Offline charentejohn

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2020, 06:18:56 am »
Found the little devils,  a neighbour ratted them out  :smile: 
They are on a Jasmine hedge which is flowering now in early November.
You must be the change you want to see in the world - Mahatma Gandhi

Offline sawdstmakr

  • Global Moderator
  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 11481
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2020, 10:25:14 am »
John,
What type of Jasmine is it? The Jasmine we have here is poisonous and the bees will not go near it.
Jim Altmiller

Offline sawdstmakr

  • Global Moderator
  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 11481
  • Gender: Male
Re: Follow the bloom 2020
« Reply #66 on: November 09, 2020, 10:28:51 am »
Here is a little bit of information on Jasmines.

Plants that bloom in the daytime may attract pollinators, including bees, but you may not want these insects near your home for fear of accidental stings. As a solution, night blooming jasmine (Cestrum nocturnum) provides your garden with intoxicating scents, but without attracting many bees.

Beside above, what does star jasmine attract? Also called Confederate jasmine, star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) is a vine that produces highly fragrant, white blossoms that attract bees. Native to China and Japan, it does very well in California and the southern U.S., where it provides excellent ground cover and climbing decoration.