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Author Topic: Interesting video  (Read 126 times)

Offline Nock

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Interesting video
« on: November 27, 2019, 09:13:02 am »

Anyone else noticed this?

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Interesting video
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2019, 12:30:51 pm »
It is currently 51degrees here in North Mississippi, after a long day and night of rain. My bees are all over my provided pollen-sub. That is the reason I have it available to them most of the winter months even though they do not fly many days due to even colder weather cycles, and we have many colder days for sure.  They should have adequate supplies of pollen stored for the long winter for their survival as they worked so hard for during the summer months.  I do not want them to just survive, I want them to prosper. I feel that when pollen is brought in, even in the winter months, this (may) stimulate the colony to raise more winter brood than without sub, that otherwise they would not attempt to do?? I do know that in the dearth time in the later summer months, the bees will slow down brood raising to almost nothing, depending on the colony.  I experienced this very thing this past season, I actually wondered if some of my hives had went queenless with the drastic halt in brood. I found they had not went queenless. When the goldenrod kicked in they were booming once again with brood. Therefore I continue to take Davids advise, along with our own Mr Live oak and I make available open pollen feeding throughout the winter months, Just as I did my first winter.  I also provide a liquid feed for them to give both ingredients needed for brood raising, I feel it takes both to stimulate the hive?  I agree with David, my bees came out of winter last year stronger than they were going into winter, As I had made late fall splits, going into the winter months with only 7 weak, jusd split nucs. Coming out with 7 booming strong nucs.

Food for thought, I have heard and read we should place our hives facing south to avoid the bitter north winds. I have found by observing there is an even more important reason in my area, that my hives should face south, The southern facing hives are active much earlier in the morning before the ones facing a direction that the sun does not hit the opening side of the hive. It seems the sun's warmth at the opening seems to stimulate the bees to fly much earlier in the morning and again, later in the evening, giving them a crucial advantage in taking advantage of working hours, especially in the cold, short days of winter? This practice gives them a distinct advantage of prospering.
Phillip  Hall
« Last Edit: November 27, 2019, 01:17:49 pm by Ben Framed »

Online van from Arkansas

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Re: Interesting video
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2019, 10:31:41 pm »
Mr. Ben, hey Buddy: I agree with your above post, 100%.  Think OAV, last treatment in Dec.

Now Consider this: I just stopped feeding ultra bee pollen a week ago, Mid November.  I plan to treat OAV mid December and I do not want any capped brood in the hive.  After I treat for mites I will resume feeding ultra bee.  Also, On a warm enough day, in late January or February  I will add patties directly above the brood nest while still offering community pollen feeder.  So if you plan to treat with OAV in December, consider this post.

Of interest is only the patties directly above the brood will be taken.  The patty that hangs off to adjacent frame without brood will not be eaten, only the pollen patty that is directly above the brood will be used by the bees.  I think this is in part due to cold temps and the bees cannot travel to adjacent frames.

I am north of you Mr. Ben, our mean last frost will be in late April.  March surely will have many frosty mornings.

Blessings

Van
Bless the Beekeepers.  Dealing with venomous insects takes courage, patience, dedication and a desire to be with nature.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Interesting video
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2019, 10:58:02 pm »
Mr. Ben, hey Buddy: I agree with your above post, 100%.  Think OAV, last treatment in Dec.

Now Consider this: I just stopped feeding ultra bee pollen a week ago, Mid November.  I plan to treat OAV mid December and I do not want any capped brood in the hive.  After I treat for mites I will resume feeding ultra bee.  Also, On a warm enough day, in late January or February  I will add patties directly above the brood nest while still offering community pollen feeder.  So if you plan to treat with OAV in December, consider this post.

Of interest is only the patties directly above the brood will be taken.  The patty that hangs off to adjacent frame without brood will not be eaten, only the pollen patty that is directly above the brood will be used by the bees.  I think this is in part due to cold temps and the bees cannot travel to adjacent frames.

I am north of you Mr. Ben, our mean last frost will be in late April.  March surely will have many frosty mornings.

Blessings

Van

Thank you mr Van, very good points. Especially if we are planing on treating in December which I am. I may slow down my pollen until after I do the December treatments as you have described.. Thanks so much for your input.
Phillip