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Author Topic: Fall feeding pictures.  (Read 147 times)

Offline van from Arkansas

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  • Van from Arkansas.
Fall feeding pictures.
« on: November 10, 2019, 02:43:20 pm »
Temp from 26F to 75F in 48 hrs.  Currently 72F so I am feeding 2X sugar as the temp is back to the teens in 48hrs.  I use 3 buckets filled with styrofoam peanuts and sticks for the bees to climb on.

My entrances are reduced to 3/4 in so there is a bit of a traffic jam in the nuc  as shown.

Criticism, ideas, suggestions, welcome, always looking to improve.
Blessings
Van

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Bless the Beekeepers.  Dealing with venomous insects takes courage, patience, dedication and a desire to be with nature.

Offline van from Arkansas

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 02:43:58 pm »
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Sunday November 10, 2019.
Bless the Beekeepers.  Dealing with venomous insects takes courage, patience, dedication and a desire to be with nature.

Offline Dallasbeek

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 06:37:44 pm »
Might the bees fill up with sugar water and be unable to fly up out of the bucket?
"Liberty lives in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no laws, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand, 1944

Offline van from Arkansas

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 06:56:34 pm »
Dallas, a few of the bees get stuffed and temporally grounded unable to fly.  But in a short time, like two hours the bees fly off.  I guess the overloaded bees digest some of the sugar, elimination occurs, lightening the load and the bees become capable of flight.

My observation is based on the elimination of sugar waste, bee poop, which coats the bucket walls.  My best guess.

The reason for the sticks is for the overloaded bees to crawl up and rest and digest.  Early feeding, like the first 2-3 hours, the sticks will have many bees, but prior to sunset the sticks will be clear of bees.
Van

Sundown 5:05pm.  The critters on the side of the bucket are almost all yellow jackets.  The sticks don?t have bees on them.
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« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 07:11:09 pm by van from Arkansas »
Bless the Beekeepers.  Dealing with venomous insects takes courage, patience, dedication and a desire to be with nature.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 10:38:05 pm »
Mr Van, your bees are tearing up, few if any are drowning as far as I can tell. Looks good to me! 👍🏻
Phillip

Offline Nock

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2019, 10:16:41 am »
Low 60?s here yesterday as well. I saw some pollen coming in from somewhere.

Offline van from Arkansas

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2019, 04:18:31 pm »
Thank you Phil for the kind words.

Nock, yesterday, Sunday 72F, Monday night, 18F.  Sunshine yesterday, snow today, Monday.  Go figure???  My poor queens don?t know what to do: lay or cluster??

Blessings
Bless the Beekeepers.  Dealing with venomous insects takes courage, patience, dedication and a desire to be with nature.

Offline FloridaGardener

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Re: Fall feeding pictures.
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2019, 08:05:41 pm »
Van, I put this link in a different post just now, but I think it's a good article worth noting, re: adding 60 mg of zinc /kilo of feed for best larval development.  As opposed to straight sugar.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/eea.12342