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Author Topic: When to replace a failing Queen?  (Read 185 times)

Offline CoolBees

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When to replace a failing Queen?
« on: October 23, 2019, 04:30:53 pm »
When should I replace a failing Queen?

... I had a queen that was failing. Spotty brood patterns during the summer, and worse into August. Hive was strong at that time with 3 x 8 frame med boxes full of bees and stores.

I thought I'd let nature take its course - assuming that the bees knew best, and would replace her. They didn't.

Last Sundays inspection showed that Wax moths had invaded and mostly taken over. No queen. No brood. About 4 frames of bees left. Pretty much a mess inside.

I know there are probably several trains of thought on this, so im interested in all thoughts/comments?
You cannot permanently help men by doing for them, what they could and should do for themselves - Abraham Lincoln

Online iddee

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Re: When to replace a failing Queen?
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2019, 10:06:56 pm »
""When should I replace a failing Queen?""

YESTERDAY.
By the time you realize she is failing, you are already late.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*

Online Michael Bush

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Re: When to replace a failing Queen?
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2019, 08:43:06 am »
>When should I replace a failing Queen?

Anytime I am certain the queen is failing I would replace her.  Just take into account conditions and time of year etc.  A good queen can't raise brood, it takes workers to do that.  She can only lay eggs and maintain morale with her pheromones, but she needs help.  Sometimes it takes a bit for her to get started.  But if you have a queen who used to do well who is now laying spotty brood and/or her hive is on a down turn and that can't be explained by conditions (dearth, time or year etc.) then I would requeen.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Online Ben Framed

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Re: When to replace a failing Queen?
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2019, 12:00:28 pm »
When should I replace a failing Queen?

... I had a queen that was failing. Spotty brood patterns during the summer, and worse into August. Hive was strong at that time with 3 x 8 frame med boxes full of bees and stores.

I thought I'd let nature take its course - assuming that the bees knew best, and would replace her. They didn't.

Last Sundays inspection showed that Wax moths had invaded and mostly taken over. No queen. No brood. About 4 frames of bees left. Pretty much a mess inside.

I know there are probably several trains of thought on this, so im interested in all thoughts/comments?

Good post Alan, 
Phillip

Offline CoolBees

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Re: When to replace a failing Queen?
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2019, 12:38:50 pm »
Thank you Gentlemen for the answers. Very clear.

This queen came with a swarm in the spring, so she was older. She did great in the spring, but by early summer showed signs of degrading.

I will approach this differently next time. I is still learnin'.  :grin:
You cannot permanently help men by doing for them, what they could and should do for themselves - Abraham Lincoln

Online Michael Bush

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Re: When to replace a failing Queen?
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2019, 03:14:33 pm »
I like them to notice and take care of it.  Usually by the time I notice they are taking care of it, but sometimes the bees don't have the instinct to sense a failing queen.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin