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Author Topic: Rescuing Baby Mice  (Read 69 times)

Offline The15thMember

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Rescuing Baby Mice
« on: August 15, 2019, 02:51:54 pm »
Yesterday morning, my little sisters were outside and one of our puppies, Nova, was walking around like she had something in her mouth she wasn't supposed to have.  They got Nova to drop it, and it was a baby mouse!  Its eyes were still closed and it was furred already, and it seemed to be fine, just a little cold.  Nova seemed interested in snooping around in the garage, so we figured she'd found it in there, but it is a baby that is too little to be out of the nest yet, as it its eyes aren't even open.  We decided to try to help out the little mouse, so we did some research and found that the mouse is about 2 weeks old and needs to be fed every 2 hours.  We ran to the store and got some kitten replacer formula and some Pedialyte to help with dehydration.  Then that afternoon, my little sisters went out to feed the mouse and they found another baby on the garage floor.  Since then we have found 2 more on the garage floor in about the same place!  We have no idea where they are coming from.  They can sort of walk, and we've been finding them squirming around just in the middle of the floor, not really close to anything.  We've looked in all sorts of obvious places nearby for a nest, but we can't find anything.  The babies aren't in too bad of shape, and they aren't showing signs of dehydration, but at the same time they are leaving a nest, so we can't seem to figure out if their mama is still caring for them or not.  We put them in a critter keeper, and are on a 2 hour feeding regimen including overnight last night.  If we could find the nest, we'd put them back in it, but we just can't find it.  We are planning on caring for them until they are old enough to release into the wild, which would be about 3 weeks from now. 

Also just by the way, we are aware of the potential hantavirus risk with wild mice and are taking the proper precautions.  We're keeping them outside on the porch, and we are wearing gloves all the time, keeping their little cage clean, and washing our hands every time we are around them.

Here's some pictures.     
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I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline jvalentour

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Re: Rescuing Baby Mice
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2019, 12:40:37 am »
#15,
I can't tell you how much damage mice have caused me in my hives and other property. 
You are free to do as you want here in the US but my hive tool works well to end the life of mice in my hives. 
I get great pleasure in ending their lives a quickly as I can in my barn and outhouses and anywhere else I can.
Best of luck to you.

PS:  any luck fishing with newborn mice?

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Rescuing Baby Mice
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2019, 12:54:35 am »
#15,
I can't tell you how much damage mice have caused me in my hives and other property. 
You are free to do as you want here in the US but my hive tool works well to end the life of mice in my hives. 
I get great pleasure in ending their lives a quickly as I can in my barn and outhouses and anywhere else I can.
Best of luck to you.

PS:  any luck fishing with newborn mice?
I figured there would be a comment like this, which is fine, free country like you said. We have mice around here, obviously, but we don?t really have trouble with them. We have plenty of rat snakes and outdoor and indoor cats so our population is pretty under control.  As such we see them as a working part of our local ecosystem, and not particularly as a pest. I?d also like to note that if the babies were in really bad shape, we wouldn?t go to all this trouble, we would just put them out of their misery. But the fact that they seem quite healthy makes it impossible for us personally to feel good about condemning them to death for really no reason. Just our perspective on our situation, of course.

My parents were really into fishing before us kids were born, but it didn?t really transition over to us. We do go trout fishing occasionally, but on the whole it?s something we talk about doing more than we actually do.
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Rescuing Baby Mice
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2019, 08:49:05 am »
JT,
I was also expecting an answer like yours when I read the Members post. I also thought the same but that is not what Member needs.
Gg in the garage and look up where you saw the mice on the ground. There is probably a small hole in the ceiling. I used to have problems with squirrels in the attic of my workshop in Jacksonxille. The squirrels would chew through the drywall and make holes. There are at least three holes in the ceiling of my workshop.
My wife used to raise the baby squirrels as you are doing. Bee sure to feed them natural foods that are in your area to get them ready for release.
They get really hungry when they cannot find the food you are feeding them.
Three days after I released one of the squirrels, I walked out back without a shirt on and that squirrel jumped from a tree onto my Barack and ran circles around my chest. I scrambled to get him off and get in the house. I went back outside with a heavy shirt on and a lot of the food we were feeding him and put it in a feeder. We kept the feeder full until he learned to eat natural foods.
Jim Altmiller

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Rescuing Baby Mice
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2019, 10:21:15 am »
JT,
I was also expecting an answer like yours when I read the Members post. I also thought the same but that is not what Member needs.
Gg in the garage and look up where you saw the mice on the ground. There is probably a small hole in the ceiling. I used to have problems with squirrels in the attic of my workshop in Jacksonxille. The squirrels would chew through the drywall and make holes. There are at least three holes in the ceiling of my workshop.
That's a good idea, Jim, but unfortunately not possible in our garage.  We have exposed beams and then above them is just the metal roof, so no space for a hidden nest up there.   

My wife used to raise the baby squirrels as you are doing. Bee sure to feed them natural foods that are in your area to get them ready for release.
They get really hungry when they cannot find the food you are feeding them.
Three days after I released one of the squirrels, I walked out back without a shirt on and that squirrel jumped from a tree onto my Barack and ran circles around my chest. I scrambled to get him off and get in the house. I went back outside with a heavy shirt on and a lot of the food we were feeding him and put it in a feeder. We kept the feeder full until he learned to eat natural foods.
Jim Altmiller
Oh my gosh, that is a funny story!  Thanks for the tips.  :happy:  The babies eyes are starting to open today, and they are becoming very mobile.  They are doing surprisingly well. 
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.