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Author Topic: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?  (Read 469 times)

Offline bobll

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Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« on: July 06, 2019, 09:57:16 pm »
I have foundationless frames in my long lang hive. They are doing well. About 15 filled out to some degree. Most are almost completely solid around four edges, however, July and August are blazing in Georgia. I do have my hive in shade from 1:00 PM onward, but I have been noticing the propolis melting, or at least becoming very soft and gluey. At what temperature do I need to worry about comb collapse? Is that an issue with foundationless beekeeping?

Offline cao

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2019, 11:36:32 pm »
I think the biggest issue with foundationless frames is flipping them over to check the other side before they have attached it fully to the frame.  As long as there is enough bees they will keep the hive cool enough.  If you are worried about the heat then do less intensive inspections less often.  In other words let the bees do what they do.

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2019, 07:49:59 am »
X2

Offline TheHoneyPump

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2019, 03:43:32 pm »
Beeswax melts near 145 degF.  The temperature is not exact, due to other stuff mixed in. It gets quite soft over 115 degF

The bees keep the hive at 95 degF by fanning and water evaporation.  If the ambient temperatures are much higher than 95, the advice is stay out and make sure the bees have access to a water source nearby so they can keep the AC on.  They will spend more time and energy hauling water and cooling than making honey during heat waves.  Expect honey production to go down, not up, when it is sunny and hot out there.
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Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2019, 06:15:40 am »
I think the biggest issue with foundationless frames is flipping them over to check the other side before they have attached it fully to the frame.  As long as there is enough bees they will keep the hive cool enough.  If you are worried about the heat then do less intensive inspections less often.  In other words let the bees do what they do.
M
X2


Yep

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2019, 09:15:40 am »
I wouldn?t open a hive in hot weather if there isn?t some support.  Probably in the 90s.
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Offline bobll

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2019, 11:34:54 pm »
Well, I listened to everyone's advice to stay out of a foundationless frame hive in the hot summer, then went stupid again. The hive has dropped population drastically around the entrance, and I was worried about SHBs destroying the hive, or a backfilled brood nest. However, after I went in I had a honey comb break out of a frame (my first) and even after that horrendous drippy mess, I tried to get into the brood nest, where I forgot I had placed an empty frame, and managed to collapse that partially made comb also. It is still in the hive, broken off and leaning against another comb. It was a complete fiasco. I didn't get a chance to check for brood or eggs. I hope I did not kill the queen.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2019, 11:40:54 pm »
Well, I listened to everyone's advice to stay out of a foundationless frame hive in the hot summer, then went stupid again. The hive has dropped population drastically around the entrance, and I was worried about SHBs destroying the hive, or a backfilled brood nest. However, after I went in I had a honey comb break out of a frame (my first) and even after that horrendous drippy mess, I tried to get into the brood nest, where I forgot I had placed an empty frame, and managed to collapse that partially made comb also. It is still in the hive, broken off and leaning against another comb. It was a complete fiasco. I didn't get a chance to check for brood or eggs. I hope I did not kill the queen.

Maybe not.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Comb collapse in foundationless deep frames?
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2019, 12:06:30 pm »
The thing is to do it early in the morning.  Like 1/2 hour before sunrise.  When it's still cool out.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin