Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: 2 queen excluders  (Read 163 times)

Offline Dr. B in Wisconsin

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 91
  • Gender: Male
2 queen excluders
« on: August 13, 2018, 09:48:29 pm »
Hello All
Getting late here in Wisconsin, took a bike ride and there is less available for the bees, golden rod is starting. I just took off 63 lbs and have 2 deeps and 5 supers on. Starting to wind down for fall and put a queen excluder right above the deeps and another one above the first 2 supers. Never tried this, but last year the queen was busy laying eggs in the super and I was hoping to have a good super for winter. I put all 5 supers on so they would get cleaned up and have the comb rebuilt to some extent. I will probably take a super or two off shortly but maybe not since a huge clover field may be flowering in a couple off weeks. I am not even sure where the queen is after harvesting the honey. How restrictive would this be for the bees? The queen was laying in the first super. Any thoughts on this.
Thanks,
Brian

Offline ed/La.

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 110
  • Gender: Male
Re: 2 queen excluders
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2018, 10:28:15 pm »
It doesn't matter where the queen lays if you are leaving the honey. It sounds like you harvested all the honey and hope to harvest more.  They need this honey for winter. I would pull the excluders and leave the fall flow for the bees.

Offline Van, Arkansas, USA

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 996
  • Gender: Male
Re: 2 queen excluders
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2018, 11:11:56 pm »
Your bees will need about 13 pounds of honey per month of winter, per hive.  Actually less honey October Nov, Dec but double that amount in January through the spring flow.  But 13 pounds is a good average. 

The 13 pounds was derived from research and varies with region.  But 13 pounds is a good place to start. In Arkansas I need about 45-60 pounds of Honey per double deep hive and that is to keep the hive alive.  In spring, I have to feed in syrupb in March as stores will be little to none.  The bees really go through the remaining honey for brood.  This area is heavy with pollen so my hives always seem to have enough bee bread.

Some species of honey bees are known for small winter clusters thus requiring less honey. 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 11:26:37 pm by Van, Arkansas, USA »

Offline JackM

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 689
  • Gender: Male
Re: 2 queen excluders
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2018, 09:26:09 am »
FEED, FEED, FEED, FEED.  I find it rare the fall flow is enough for a winter.  At least here.  FEED them.
Jack of all trades
Master of none.

Offline beepro

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 566
  • Gender: Male
Re: 2 queen excluders
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2018, 10:16:35 pm »
As long as the flow is on the bees will store so QE is not an issue.  Make sure they have enough for
winter otherwise you have to supplement feed to weight.