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Author Topic: 5th open hive removal, tomorrow.  (Read 668 times)

Offline sawdstmakr

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5th open hive removal, tomorrow.
« on: July 24, 2018, 11:17:57 pm »
My wife, Judy, received a message from a friend from the school she retired from with the below photos. We are going to remove or at least try to remove it tomorrow morning. They say it is 20 feet up. I suspect it is much higher than that. The limb looks like it is at least 6 inches in diameter. I suspect it is 2 to 3 times bigger than the vineyard hive.
The plan is to pick a spot on this branch that is much closer to the ground and cut it so that the hive is slowly lowered down to head high and then remove it.
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Jim

Offline Acebird

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Re: 5th open hive removal, tomorrow.
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2018, 08:05:47 am »
Can open hives survive in FL?
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: 5th open hive removal, tomorrow.
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2018, 09:11:30 am »
Can open hives survive in FL?
The first open air hive that removed was a softball sized swarm in late February in a leafless tree. It was one of the coldest springs in a long time. They did not call me until mid May when it was a larger than a football and she considered it a threat.
I removed one hive that was a foot wide and at least 30 inches long by 16 inches tall. Also a second year hive.
So yes they can survive. I suspect that this is this hives second year.
Jim

Offline Dallasbeek

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Re: 5th open hive removal, tomorrow.
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2018, 02:12:47 pm »
I saw pictures of an open air hive here in Dallas that must have been several years old.  One taken in warm weather showed bees all over the comb.  Another, taken during cold weather, showed only bare comb.  The bees went up into the comb, maybe even into empty cells, to cluster.  I guess wax and honey can be pretty good insulation. 
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Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: 5th open hive removal, tomorrow.
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2018, 04:41:59 pm »
Here are some pictures that my wife and I took.
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This picture I took standing under the hive. It is 20 feet off the ground. The guy that reported it actually measured it.  It is much smaller than I was expecting. I even brought a deep box as well as a medium box expecting a large hive.

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Here you can see the tree is on the ground, there are parts of the comb on the ground also. Unlike an oak tree which will slowly lower to the ground as you cut it, a Sweet Gum snaps when you reach the half way point of the cut. Note to self, don?t forget that.

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Here is the hive section that stayed on the tree.