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Author Topic: Walk away split?  (Read 592 times)

Offline Aroc

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Walk away split?
« on: June 01, 2018, 05:54:56 pm »
 I am attempting a couple of walk away splits.   They were done on 21 May. Very hard to stay away.   Pretty much everything I have read or heard tells me to stay away for 30 days. I would like to go in about days 10 and see if any queen cells have in fact been capped. Is this advisable or should I stay out for the full month.
You are what you think.

Offline moebees

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2018, 06:41:19 pm »
I would go in and check for queen cells before queens emerge.  Unless this is a one shot deal then I would check. Because if you wait 30 days and they never had any queen cells what can you do then?  Pretty much combine back with the original or another split. If you check and there are no queen cells you can give them a frame of brood, or a queen or an extra queen cell from another split.  Once queens emerge I would leave them alone.
Bee-keeping is like raising Martians  - Isabella Rosselini

Van, Arkansas, USA

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2018, 06:54:01 pm »
Aroc, I raise queens. I create a walk away split ya might say, except there is no queen in either box.  I use five frame Nucs for mating nucs.  I open the nuc every other day.  I have to watch for rogue queens, queen cells, I add cell larva frames, a day later I remove and add larva.,,,,,, constant opening of the nucs.

My point is this: I am opening my mating nucs constantly, at least every other day.  Also I have established Nucs inwhich I open every week or so to check status, that is, amount of eggs laid.

Another point I wish to make: these are my bees with my chosen genetics which one is gentleness.  So what works for me, constant interruptions, may not work with your bees.

However, if your bees abscond or the queen quits laying because of opening a hive once in ten days, I say your better off without those picky bees anyway.  Go for it, open the split!!!
Blessings


Offline cao

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2018, 07:45:58 pm »
As moebees stated,  check to see if queen cell(s) have been as least started then do the bee math on hatching, mating and laying.  I typically leave them alone for about 3 weeks if the queen cell is capped.  Then the inspection is only to find out if the queen is there and laying.  I close them up after finding out.

Offline Oldbeavo

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2018, 05:48:36 am »
Check after 3 days to see if any have been formed, if you damage one at this stage the bees will fix.If you check when fully formed and damage it then kiss that one goodbye and hope there are more to replace it.
if you have multiple cells then wait till day 17/18 to see if hatched, on some torn down, then there is queen present.
Leave now for 10-14 days (weather dependant, poor weather may not go out to mate) to see if there are eggs.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2018, 08:32:44 am »
Wow, I guess everyone has their own meaning for a walk away.
This is Michael Bush's version.
http://www.bushfarms.com/beessplits.htm

I do it by the box.  Just deal the deck.  What I recommend is to go online and print or view a queen calendar even if you are doing a "walk a way".  That way you know what stage of development the queen is in and can avoid the sensitive times should you want to intervene.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline beepro

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2018, 02:34:29 pm »
It is still a split no matter what you call it.   You can call it a revisit split.   Anyways, I would make sure that
they have the cap QCs first before leaving them alone.    I would also recheck to see if they have a running virgin in
there after 7 days just to be sure.    Then after 2 weeks check again to see if any sign of new eggs to ensure that I have
a queen right laying hive.   These 3 steps I will not miss because of the possibility of developing a LWs hive if I leave them alone
for 30 days.  Just before the sunset is the best time to do this inspection. 

Offline beepro

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Re: Walk away split?
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2018, 05:11:00 am »
This is the result of using the 3 stages of monitoring a split hive that I recommend.  Nothing to lose but more to
gain by knowing the hive condition earlier.  The standard 30 days recommendation of waiting is already obsolete.
Now I don't have to worry about LWs hives anymore.  Monitor using the queen rearing calendar to gauge.

Pic taken tonight one out of many still to come.   She quickly destroyed 3 other cap QCs on the adjacent frames.
Now I will leave this nuc hive alone for 7 days with a follow up hive inspection at night then another inspection on day 16 for new fresh eggs.  It pays to know the various stages of queen rearing in your head.


One big, fat healthy virgin running around:   https://images2.imgbox.com/ee/6a/hfjHQSrR_o.jpg