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Author Topic: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips  (Read 654 times)

Offline little john

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Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« on: April 17, 2018, 11:12:22 am »
From another thread (https://beemaster.com/forum/index.php?topic=51169.0):

Quote
eltalia: For this example I am in two minds over the fishing line, a concept I am currently trialling this example tells me the frame positioning may be the problem as the comb appears to be off centre. Bill

Here's one method I'm currently playing with - which should ensure that off-centre foundationless combs become a thing of the past.  (Oh yeah - dream on ...)



This is only a mating-nuc frame of course, but it'll be interesting to see how the bees draw these out.  If it does works as intended, I'll try the same method with all sizes of frame ...
LJ
A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping - http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com

Offline Bush_84

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Re: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2018, 12:22:00 pm »
How do you fix the wax to the wood?  Sounds like a neat project but sounds like a lot of work. I have honestly only ever used a small starter strip. I generally buy the wedge top frames from Mann lake and turn the wedge on end. I don?t have a ton of issues unless I need a lot of comb built. In that case things can get off track. Otherwise I just put an empty frame between two drawn frames. Drone comb is more of an issue for me. My plan is to use Nucs to draw most of my comb. From what I understand Nucs draw less drone comb.
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline little john

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Re: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2018, 12:58:28 pm »
Hi Dan - very little work involved.  What some people do is to cast molten wax onto a flat sheet of plywood, then roll the wax sheet to make it flexible, then cut it into strips to then fix into frames as starter-strips.  By directly casting the wax in situ, all that work is eliminated.

Simply soak a batten (cut to length) in water, then place against wherever you want a starter-strip and pour a spoonful of molten wax along that batten - wait 10 seconds or so, then remove it.  Voila - the starter strip is in place and fully attached.

Now normally I only use a starter at the top (usually a glued-in popsicle stick), but even that requires the cutting of a suitable groove. But - thought on this occasion I'd attach starters all round and see what happens.  Might even get the bees to drawn down to the bottom bar - who knows ?
LJ
A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping - http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com

Offline eltalia

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Re: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2018, 08:10:01 pm »
So this "batten" is a former with a slot cut into it wherein one pours the molten wax?

Bill

Offline little john

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Re: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2018, 04:24:34 am »
So this "batten" is a former with a slot cut into it wherein one pours the molten wax?

Bill

Hi Bill - no - much simpler than that ...




I've taken the liberty of adding a legend to Cheshire's original diagram.  I find that holding the assembly at a much flatter angle (say, around 10 degrees), then flooding the side of the batten - allowing excess wax to run off - produces a much thinner and more uniform starter strip, thusly:



'best,
LJ
A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping - http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com

Offline eltalia

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Re: Cast-In-Position Starter-Strips
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2018, 06:12:30 pm »
So this "batten" is a former with a slot cut into it wherein one pours the molten wax?

Bill

Hi Bill - no - much simpler
(edit)

Great, got it LJ.. thanks ;-))

/waves

Bill