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Author Topic: DIY Frame Construction  (Read 396 times)

Offline hrtull

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DIY Frame Construction
« on: August 02, 2017, 06:33:29 am »
https://1drv.ms/f/s!AsCuy4qQoApjmmVHyUZsDRds5Zdr

I thought I would try and share this video on how I make frames.  The majority of frames are made from scrap 2X  pine thanks to the  huge amount of housing developments around me.  If thats not available a $6  10ft 2x6 will generate a huge pile of frame material.  I didnt get into dimensions as you would just copy your existing frames and their various sizes.  More about technique/process.  I didnt show adding holes to sides if you are using wire.  The steps would be.  1) cut length of stock slightly longer than needed  for two sides. I use table saw to rip to 1 3/8 width by making two passes, I can rip a 2x6 by flipping stock board over for second pass. 2) Dado both ends of stock to required depth and width. I make several passes instead of a dado blade 3) cut 45 degree angle as required .  I will dado several pieces for brood frames and medium frames and also cut the 45 degree angle. I leave this distance from top bar to 45 angle the same for brood and supers and just add length as require. 4) Drill press wire holes as deep as possible. 5) Start slicing the sides and drill press holes as you continue. 6) Cut sides to length as required from slices. One slice should render two sides. 7) trim sides to the 45 degree bevel, cut top and bottom bars as required.  Modify top and bottom bars as required to receive foundations, starter strips etc. I  staple with 3/4 in x  1/4 crown staples and waterproof glue. These have worked very well and bees  have filled them with nice looking comb. Try and mill as much big stuff first and work your way down to the small stuff.  Cut the longest length you can handle for Bar material then cross cut.  Hope this is useful and that video functions, Thanks HRTULL

Offline paus

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Re: DIY Frame Construction
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2017, 10:59:58 am »
I DONT HAVE TIME TO BUILD MY OWN FRAMES BECAUSE IT INTERFERS WITH MY REST TIME.  LAST WINTER I READ ABOUT USEING SKEWERS FOR COMB SUPPORT.  WHEN I BUILD MY FRAMES I DRILL TWO OR THREE HOLES IN THE BOTTOM STRIP  EQUALLY SPACED AND USE THE SKEWERS WITH A DROP OF GLUE, I DRIVE THE SHARP END OF THE SKEWER INTO THE TOP FRAME AND GLUE.  SO FAR I AM VERY HAPPY WITH THE WAY BEES START COMB NEXT TO THE SKEWERS, AND OF COURSE FILL IN THE SPACE.  I AM GOING ALL FOUNDATIONLESS,  THANKS TO MR. BUSH. 

Offline Eric Bosworth

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Re: DIY Frame Construction
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2017, 09:32:46 am »
https://1drv.ms/f/s!AsCuy4qQoApjmmVHyUZsDRds5Zdr

I thought I would try and share this video on how I make frames.  The majority of frames are made from scrap 2X  pine thanks to the  huge amount of housing developments around me.  If thats not available a $6  10ft 2x6 will generate a huge pile of frame material.  I didnt get into dimensions as you would just copy your existing frames and their various sizes.  More about technique/process.  I didnt show adding holes to sides if you are using wire.  The steps would be.  1) cut length of stock slightly longer than needed  for two sides. I use table saw to rip to 1 3/8 width by making two passes, I can rip a 2x6 by flipping stock board over for second pass. 2) Dado both ends of stock to required depth and width. I make several passes instead of a dado blade 3) cut 45 degree angle as required .  I will dado several pieces for brood frames and medium frames and also cut the 45 degree angle. I leave this distance from top bar to 45 angle the same for brood and supers and just add length as require. 4) Drill press wire holes as deep as possible. 5) Start slicing the sides and drill press holes as you continue. 6) Cut sides to length as required from slices. One slice should render two sides. 7) trim sides to the 45 degree bevel, cut top and bottom bars as required.  Modify top and bottom bars as required to receive foundations, starter strips etc. I  staple with 3/4 in x  1/4 crown staples and waterproof glue. These have worked very well and bees  have filled them with nice looking comb. Try and mill as much big stuff first and work your way down to the small stuff.  Cut the longest length you can handle for Bar material then cross cut.  Hope this is useful and that video functions, Thanks HRTULL
My dad had a portable sawmill come and I had him cut a 10" X 1.375" for end bars. I like your little diagonal cuts. I was running my through a router but I think your way is probably quicker. Sawdust just puts the blade on his table saw as high as it will go and cuts the edge off. The only problem with his approach is that it only works with medium or short frames. I am slowly migrating to mediums however. When I run out of wood from the portable sawmill, I have a local sawmill where I can get cheap hemlock. The wood that my dad had cut was hemlock and larch. I'm almost out of wood. The problem I have is that hemlock and larch is heavy. My father did mention that he might need to cut some logs and have the guy come back with the sawmill. If he does I am going to cut aspen. Hemlock is way to heavy. It isn't good for much but for bee woodenware it should be fine. It is really light and thats great for bee boxes. It might not last very long but that is ok. If I wax dip it should last a good while. Certainly for the price and since I want to get rid of the trees anyway why not?
All political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The communist party must command all the guns; that way, no guns can ever be used to command the party. ---Mao Tse Tung

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. ---Benjamin Franklin

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: DIY Frame Construction
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2017, 08:33:06 pm »
Eric,
Aspen will probably last a very long time inside the hive box. Most commercial frames are white pine which is very soft and like aspen does not last very long outside but works great in the hive. It is also used for the Supers and holds up pretty well when painted and kept fairly dry.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Eric Bosworth

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Re: DIY Frame Construction
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2017, 07:21:04 pm »
Eric,
Aspen will probably last a very long time inside the hive box. Most commercial frames are white pine which is very soft and like aspen does not last very long outside but works great in the hive. It is also used for the Supers and holds up pretty well when painted and kept fairly dry.
Jim
If I deep fry in wax it should last a good while. I want to see how this winter goes. If I have good results this winter I hope to expand more next year. I am doing my best to use the Michael Palmer nuc method. I am sure it is easier with several hundred colonies to pull resources than just a few.

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All political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The communist party must command all the guns; that way, no guns can ever be used to command the party. ---Mao Tse Tung

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. ---Benjamin Franklin