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Author Topic: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...  (Read 4415 times)

Online gww

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2016, 09:49:26 pm »
minz
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Looks pretty good to me but where are the triangles? Triangles give massive strength and keep it from racking without relying on the fasteners or glue.  A piece of wood from corner to center on each side increases the strength exponentially.  Any bridge, truss or frame uses triangles to reduce the amount of material to add strength.

No wonder I go through so many screws :grin:.  I was just using the junk I can't really build anything with.  4x4s that either bowed bad or had rot in some portion and boards that may not have gotten cut at a consitant thickness or some other flaw.  I was thinking the ideal was to use stuff that would be firewood or waste if not used in some way.  This seemed like a good use for some of it.

I do wish I were a better carpender and builder though.  I do every thing that I can do with a chainsaw.
Cheers
gww

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2016, 11:30:54 pm »
Looks pretty good to me but where are the triangles? Triangles give massive strength and keep it from racking without relying on the fasteners or glue.  A piece of wood from corner to center on each side increases the strength exponentially.  Any bridge, truss or frame uses triangles to reduce the amount of material to add strength.  JM2C
It is called the golden x. In your house the frame is very weak and the plywood by itself is very weak but the plywood over the frame makes the golden x and makes your walls very strong. 
Look at any cell tower. It is all made up of a frame with "X"s providing the strength.
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline minz

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #42 on: November 12, 2016, 12:29:56 pm »
And the further you get away from the joint the more force you excerpt on it (force times distance). That is why you rarely see construction with ends that are unsupported like the legs (further the triangle goes down the leg the stronger).
Also if you put a miter (cut an angle) and tuck it under the top board there would be no moving it in a compression movement regardless of how many fasteners you used for that joint.
Poor decisions make the best stories.

Offline Acebird

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2016, 12:55:14 pm »
It appears that LJ has made himself a stand using table like construction.  A table only needs to be as strong as the load it carries.  The fact that the stand elevates the hives it is unlikely he will have any trouble with weight because he won't let the hive get out of reach.  So yes there are stronger geometries that will perform better but it doesn't have to.

Now on the discussion of out gassing methyl bromide from the pallets there must be a safety standard already in place or you would not be allowed to bring them into a building.  I am not a chemist, far from it but I do know there are meters that measure out-gassing of plastic parts or the sterilization of parts by ETO method.  It doesn't seem as though you would have to put bees in a box to prove the out-gassing of methyl bromide after so many days of treatment.
All my hives are on pallets and I don't know or care if they have been treated.  The bees have no problem crawling all over them.
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Offline minz

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #44 on: November 13, 2016, 05:21:39 pm »
It appears that LJ has made himself a stand using table like construction.  A table only needs to be as strong as the load it carries.  The fact that the stand elevates the hives it is unlikely he will have any trouble with weight because he won't let the hive get out of reach.  So yes there are stronger geometries that will perform better but it doesn't have to.

Using that theory a piece of plywood nailed to a single board would be perfectly fine balanced in the field. I could demonstrate that with something called ?statics?.  Obviously theory and practical observation are different.
I only meant to point out that if you have free pallet wood adding an additional piece at an angle would be very beneficial.
Poor decisions make the best stories.

Offline Acebird

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Re: A touch of Pallet Engineering ...
« Reply #45 on: November 13, 2016, 09:05:16 pm »
And I merely stated it would carry a greater load but it is not necessary.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it