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Author Topic: Certified Naturally Grown  (Read 1379 times)

Offline William F Abell Jr

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Certified Naturally Grown
« on: February 28, 2016, 04:07:23 pm »
I tried the search function but couldn't find anything on Certified Naturally Grown. There was an article on the organization in Feb 2016 of Bee Culture. They are apparently pushing for more apiaries to join. Is anyone here a member or know anything about them?

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Certified Naturally Grown
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2016, 09:24:44 am »
I got as far as starting to read their requirements and despite using NO treatments WHATSOEVER I would not qualify because of things like how low my stands are... silly.
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Online FloridaGardener

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Re: Certified Naturally Grown
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2019, 12:58:31 pm »
This may, or may not, be updated to set a tone of suggestions, rather than requirements

https://certified.naturallygrown.org/documents/FAQApiary.pdf

I thought there was good info on CNG's page re: homemade pollen patties.  I don't like using commercial pollen patties because of the GMO soy & canola content. 
       Personally my family has avoided GMO for 10 years, since those crops have a pesticide gene-spliced to them. This very like the method reverse transcriptase uses, which is the way the HIV virus' RNA breaks into a cell's DNA.  GMO is not the way plants or animals are selectively bred or hybridized by mating, so as to foster good qualities, or decrease unwanted qualities.
        Also, many GMO crops have the ability to be sprayed by glyphosate weed killer ("Roundup-resistant"), without impairing crop yield.  Since this is commonly practiced, there's an additional chemical inclusion in the crop.  More info: https://responsibletechnology.org/gmo-education/   Personally, I don't want EU-banned GMOs or neonicotinoids in the beehive.


It's interesting that for CNG, plastic is allowed, stating "since 
brood
 isn't 
reared
 in 
honey 
supers,
 and
 the 
majority 
of
 chemical
 residues
 end
 up 
in 
wax 
and
 not 
honey,
 plastic
 foundation 
in 
honey
 supers
 may 
actually 
be 
preferable 
to 
the 
alternatives.
 
It 
is 
in 
the 
brood 
chambers
 where 
plastic 
foundation
 is 
most 
problematic.

  Again,
 no‐foundation 
frames
 are 
ultimately 
the 
best 
for 
all 
brood
 chamber
 frames."

In gardening, the only mulch that qualifies as organic is HDPE.  I found it odd, but nothing can verifiably contain a 100% organic matter and an absence of herbicides/pesticides/GMO for five years. I suppose the conundrum must come from big-ag volume, combined with government labeling standards.  The claim is made that HDPE doesn't decompose, therefore doesn't leach into the soil.  Of course, one can use totally organic biomass mulch and follow organic principles; this has only to do with the "Certified Organic" label. 

I'd like to hear of it, if anyone is pursuing the CNG label for honey.  I suppose many sideline beeks sell 100% of their crop each year anyway, and don't need the special classification.