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Author Topic: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?  (Read 1990 times)

Offline 2Sox

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Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« on: June 15, 2015, 10:05:08 am »
I've been doing crush and strain for years - never used an extractor because I use no foundation. (I also harvest cut comb this way.) Those of you who do this know it's very labor intensive and you have to wait for gravity to get the job done.  Yes, a wine or apple press can be used but I find these almost as much of a chore.

My question:  What do you all think about using a cappings spinner like this one?  It's kind of pricey but in theory it seems like it would work fine.  Ideas?  Suggestions?

http://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=1368

Thanks.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline tjc1

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2015, 11:07:47 am »
I bought one of these last year on Ebay - about $100-130 shipped; a little funky, but it works fine and doesn't take up too much room. If you use it gently, it won't blow out the comb, though I haven't tried deep frames without foundation - I have done natural comb super frames with no foundation, but better if you string the frames with monifilament for support. The front of the comb rests against the basket railings, which also gives some support.




Offline biggraham610

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2015, 11:21:26 am »
My biggest problem with crush and strain is the wasted comb. I am just in my 3rd year and found out quickly that comb is invaluable in my area. We have a very short flow relatively speaking. None to speak of in the fall. Not enough for them to draw wax anyway. My question is why the cappings spinner instead of a regular extractor? G
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Offline 2Sox

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2015, 01:14:53 pm »
Sorry to mention that I am completely foundation-less.  Don't plan on having more than 25 hives - max.

Also, crush and strain solves the storage problem.  I just feed the after-drip back to the bees.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline D Coates

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2015, 01:20:28 pm »
I've got one of those.  They work well but for cappings, not sure about crushed comb.  Make sure to add it to it about 5# at a times if you're going to do that.  I added too many cappings (20#'s) in one dump and it couldn't process it fast enough and it made quite a mess. 

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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2015, 01:34:55 pm »
>I've been doing crush and strain for years - never used an extractor because I use no foundation.

I don't see a connection.  I use no foundation and extract all the time.  I used foundation and did crush and strain for 26 years...

> (I also harvest cut comb this way.) Those of you who do this know it's very labor intensive and you have to wait for gravity to get the job done.  Yes, a wine or apple press can be used but I find these almost as much of a chore.

You have to wait for gravity for your cappings either way...

>My question:  What do you all think about using a cappings spinner like this one?  It's kind of pricey but in theory it seems like it would work fine.  Ideas?  Suggestions?

Why not extract?  That's what I do with foundationless...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm#extract

My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin

Offline 2Sox

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2015, 09:08:43 pm »

You have to wait for gravity for your cappings either way...

Why not extract?  That's what I do with foundationless...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm#extract

Thanks for your feedback Michael. 

I've considered using an extractor but then I'd have another kind of comb storage problem.   Right now, I feed the mash back to the bees and they do a good job of taking it up.  If I extracted, I'd probably spend the same amount of time setting out the frames for the bees to clean up.  My storage problem now is that I need to store the cleaned wax mash, along with old combs in 55 gallon pails with Para Moth - so it seems whichever way I choose, I still have a wax storage problem

I'm really not sure what would be the most efficient thing for me to do at this point.  I'm getting older and I just want to make things simpler.

I realize that I have to wait for gravity for cappings too.  But not with a spinner. 

Right now, I'm using a double bucket system (several) and one of these with a filter bag inside - which seems to process more material.
http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Multi-Use-Straining-System/productinfo/295/

I'm thinking of ordering another one.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline tjc1

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2015, 11:46:23 pm »
Sorry I misunderstood that you want to keep doing crush and strain and just want a away to clean the wax...

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2015, 08:18:54 am »
It's no more work one way or the other.  Crush and strain and extracting are just as messy and just as much work other than protecting the comb from wax moths.  But having drawn comb is a big benefit.  Not one that I think is worth the cost of the extractor unless you have quite a few hives, but still a benefit.  For the same cost you could have drawn comb...
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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Offline Wombat2

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Re: Substitute for "Crush and Strain"?
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2015, 07:35:27 pm »
This how I do my manual extraction but I now have a radial extractor. This way leaves the foundation intact. Inside the tub is a mesh wardrobe drawer that fits nicely and does the initial strain/drain of the wax - there is a gate valve at the bottom front of the tube to drain the honey

http://youtu.be/FVbFuhVyFOA

The capping strainer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dee9j0wd1hU
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 07:47:55 pm by Wombat2 »
David L