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Author Topic: What do I do next in south Mississippi?  (Read 909 times)

Offline Tommy

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What do I do next in south Mississippi?
« on: March 24, 2015, 11:00:04 pm »
I removed bees from a storage room wall that had been there for 3 years.  I got all of the bees and most all of the comb.  I used 2 broods; the bottom has new frames and the top has no frames.  I curled up the comb and bees in the top brood so they would go down to the frames.  Now they've attached the comb to the inside walls of the top brood box.  What do I do next, and when, in order to change the top brood box to a brood with frames. 
Second question - I removed the swarm cells from my other hives earlier this year.  Do I keep looking for new swarm cells or will that be it for this season? It may not have been swarm cells that I removed. What I removed was a build up of comb on the bottom of the frames so if not swarm cells what is it and should it be removed ? And how often ?
Thanks for any advice.

I wanted to share my experience with catching swarms in a tree.   I 've attached a large black plastic flower pot, like you would get from a plant nursery, to the end of a large cane pole with strong hose clamps and taped up the drain holes in the bottom of the pot.  I stand under the tree limb and put the pot under the swarm.  I bump the limb with the flower pot, the swarm falls into the pot, and I pour them into a new hive.  Just a suggestion!
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 10:42:11 pm by Tommy »

Offline iddee

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Re: What do I do next in south Mississippi?
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2015, 11:50:14 pm »
First, never remove swarm cells to stop them from swarming. It doesn't work. They will swarm anyway and you will be left queenless.

Second, try to ask questions before doing what you aren't sure of. NEVER leave open areas in a hive. That is the first place they will hang comb.

Third, review a few of the removals on this forum. See how they rubber band the comb into frames. That will show you what you must do now. It is just like another removal.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Offline OldMech

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Re: What do I do next in south Mississippi?
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2015, 09:59:50 am »
First, never remove swarm cells to stop them from swarming. It doesn't work. They will swarm anyway and you will be left queenless.

Second, try to ask questions before doing what you aren't sure of. NEVER leave open areas in a hive. That is the first place they will hang comb.

Third, review a few of the removals on this forum. See how they rubber band the comb into frames. That will show you what you must do now. It is just like another removal.

   What Iddee said.
   When you do a removal use empty frames. Cut the sections of brood comb out and rubber band/tie them into the frames to fit as best you can.  Make sure the comb is oriented right side up, then you dont have a mess to go back to later on. They will affix the cut comb to the frames.
39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.

Offline capt44

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Re: What do I do next in south Mississippi?
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2015, 10:13:09 am »
I use the flower pot type swarm traps (Pressed Fiber).
When I put the bees in a hive I do the cut out method of rubber banding the cut comb into wood frames.
Like was said make sure it is oriented up or the bees will reject it.
The cells are actually oriented at about a 3 degree angle up.
I've had excellent results doing this.
I caught 63 swarms last season.
Richard Vardaman (capt44)