Welcome, Guest

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]
91
Strips maybe, the rest I wouldn't mess with.
92
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Is it normal in the south
« Last post by Acebird on July 02, 2020, 09:36:29 am »
During the spring, before the flow, I feed to get the bees to build up to be ready for the flow. I stop when the supers go on.
Jim Altmiller
That is typical management for beeks looking for the greatest output even up north.  I have no need for the greatest output so I don't feed.  I also value honey that is not the least bit contaminated with fed sugar.  Feeding negates uncontaminated honey no matter how careful you are.
I have no experience with southern FL.  It is like I am a new beek and a new gardener.  Fruit trees that flower while they are bearing fruit.  They act like a tomato plant.
The message I am getting from everyone is that bees should not be aggressive down here with exceptions... Heat, weather, genetics, prey, dearth, or maybe pests can turn their mood.  Heat, weather, and genetics is much different then up north.
Jim I mow my property with a John Deer tractor with a mowing deck within about 4 ft of the side of the hive.  No problem at all.  There is not enough room to mow in front.  My wife being an antique-er we had three sighs back north that were left.  Just another 20/20 hindsight lesson.  I am sure there are hundreds of sighs down here but covid has curtailed tag sale-ing for us.
93
When pulling honey last week, some of my bottom brood boxes had some pollen stores and a good deal of empty brood comb.  Would it be ok to rearrange the the frames?  Say take all brood and move to bottom while placing empty comb above them?  Is that too much disturbance of the nest?  I?d like to add apivar strips in the process...
94
This has been very interesting and educational. I want to thank you contributing experts for your patience and non pressured persistence. The best kind of teaching IMHO. Member, this was a great thread. We are very fortunate to have these caliber of beekeepers here that have contributed with selfless helpful information. Your questions and clear answers of their questioners was a big help, in helping me understand more about laying worker hives. Sincere thanks to all.

95
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Swarm traps
« Last post by CapnChkn on July 02, 2020, 03:37:52 am »
Quote
So, my next question is entrance size for the swarm trap. I have three options:

1. Standard wide entrance
2. Small round around 1"
3. Large round around 2"

I make the boxes a regular style with 3/4 inch openings across the front, then close it with an entrance reducer.  I can then use the boxes as a sort of nuc.  The openings I then cut are 5/16 x 2 inches.  I've made them one inch across, but they chewed a hole, just bee sized, through the front over the opening in the reducer.  I have the worst time keeping those reducers as well, they fall out on my journey to where I set the trap.

As for Tom Seeley, he says, 15^2 cm.  That translates to a 1 3/4 inch diameter.  I have one I just drilled a 1 in. hole, and is one I caught a swarm in this year.
96
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Is it normal in the south
« Last post by CapnChkn on July 02, 2020, 02:09:00 am »
Nope.  I have caught nothing but feral swarms since I got back to keeping the bees, and I've not had a mean hive yet.  I regularly use a grass sickle to trim grass around my hives and with my hand waving all over the place, nobody has decided I should be chased away, or even fly in front of my face.
97
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Bee sting variance
« Last post by Beeboy01 on July 01, 2020, 11:03:42 pm »
I've noticed a big differences in stings, sometimes they are a mild with little swelling while others swell up and itch a lot longer. From what I've noticed the bad stings are from the more aggressive guard bees. Of course some hives are hotter than others and will sting more. Sting placement and length are the main factor. If you get the stinger planted in an arm it will swell up more than a light hit through a Tee shirt.
98
HONEYBEE REMOVAL / Re: Bee removal advice
« Last post by sawdstmakr on July 01, 2020, 09:39:48 pm »
Quarintine,
I have a friend who lives in North Las Vegas. He also wanted to keep bees. I looked into your area and you are definitely in an Africanized Honey Bee area. I talked to a local beekeeper and they are forced to work with AHBs. There are so many in the area that they take over his hives.  I had to talk him out of being a beekeeper.
AHBs build their hives in the ground, like yours.
Do not try to do a removal. Not only would you bee in danger but possibly anyone within 500 feet of this hive could bee attack while you are trying to remove it. Even if you started and had to stop, the area around the hive could bee dangerous to anything moving.
Sorry for the bad news. 
Jim Altmiller
99
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: What are the Chances?
« Last post by Ben Framed on July 01, 2020, 09:03:26 pm »
Beebohy, I hope this turns out perfectly for you. Let us know how it works out se we all can benefit. Thanks.

Mr Van, same for you and please keep us informed as well. Thanks to you as well.
100
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Is it normal in the south
« Last post by sawdstmakr on July 01, 2020, 08:40:55 pm »
GF,
I control their food intake while we are in a dearth. During the spring, before the flow, I feed to get the bees to build up to be ready for the flow. I stop when the supers go on.
Jim Altmiller
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]