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21
CLUB MEETING, CONFERENCES, GATHERINGS, SEMINARS and EVENTS / Re: Beefest 2018
« Last post by iddee on January 20, 2018, 07:58:58 pm »
Matt, I have room for you. Can you get to Beez Needz? If not, we can make other arrangements.
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CLUB MEETING, CONFERENCES, GATHERINGS, SEMINARS and EVENTS / Re: Beefest 2018
« Last post by yes2matt on January 20, 2018, 07:43:40 pm »
I would like to come down from Charlotte. But I have only my old Suburban. So it is a very expensive trip. Could I catch a ride? Or offer as many as 8 rides and get some gas help? I suppose I could come down either 77 or 151 or 95 thru SC.

Wally could you make it to Clt?

Sent from my SM-J327P using Tapatalk

23
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Bee genetics
« Last post by Van, Arkansas, USA on January 20, 2018, 07:43:38 pm »
There is some miss understanding about evolution, honey bees and the so called survivor bees also called feral swarms.  Apparently there is an understanding or rather misunderstanding that feral swarms have obtained through evolution superior traits to apiary breed bees.

By definition the history of a feral swarm is unknown.  Did the swarm originate from a local apiary or did the swarm originate from a feral hive that has been in existence for 100 years or maybe only feral for a couple of years.  There is an assumption that the feral swarm is superior.  This is not a correct assumption.

There is also a lot of text about evolution and a connection is assumed with a feral bee swarm.  A feral swarm has an unknown history, do not assume the bees have evolved.  If you obtain a feral swarm such as Wallace and maintain this colony chemical free then then you have a thriving colony and by all means make splits.  Breed for the best bees.

Evolution takes thousands of generations, so with honey bees understand this could take a lifetime.  Yet I see beeks text of evolution as if this takes a few years.  Yes evolution caused by mutation can be created within a single breeding.  But to disseminate this positive mutation through the apiary and eventually the world will not happen in a lifespan.  We are talking, Varroa and virus a double threat, which completely complicates evolution.  Evolution is a slow process, this is why extinction of so many species occurs, they cannot evolve fast enough.  The honey bees, well I have hope for due to the fact so many are doing their part.  Yes we will opinion the threat and the no treat methods.  To me, I can see assurance in both methods but that is not what this thread is about.  It?s evolution verses apiary bred.

Is there truly a honey bee that has evolved survival techniques that can last from now to eternity, completely inert to Varroa, virus, bacteria foul brood, European hornet, Nosema and approx. over 100 invasive virus, bacteria, mold, and fungus that are not mentioned.  The evolution of the honey bee is a continuing process.  An organism vanishes when cellular anxiety exceeds evolution.

So in the future when you text of evolution of honey bees, understand maybe not in this lifetime.  My point, show me that evolved queen bee and I will buy her, multiply her and give the queens away for survival of the bees.
Blessings
24
DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Buying honey distributors
« Last post by 220 on January 20, 2018, 07:35:03 pm »
Its a different ball game when you start selling 1.5T IBC to 500g jars.
$9/kg might be a good minimum for bulk retail sales but it is totally unrealistic for commercial wholesale where a processor and retailer are still to add on their costs and profit margins.
I cant buy lamb from the butchers or supermarket any cheaper than $20-30kg, I certainly dont expect to receive $600 when I sell a 20kg lamb in fact if I can get a third of retail prices I am doing well. Honey is no different and $4.50/kg is about a third of retail pricing.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Bee genetics
« Last post by 220 on January 20, 2018, 06:10:04 pm »
Feral bees are severely selected for all survival traits.  In Australia you aren't really dealing with those life and death survival issues.  Small hive beetles seem to be you biggest pest.  I prefer feral bees here.  If I was there I might prefer gentle domestic bees...

The biggest advantage I can see with feral bees is they have evolved to survive in the local climate. We have areas of Australia that can receive snow 12 months of the year and large parts that rarely see temps below 70, parts that receive 12" rainfall annually and areas that receive that in a week. Bees were introduced to Aus 200 years ago so you could be looking at 200 generations of evolution to suit the local climate. To reproduce they need to successfully over winter or get through a extended summer dearth depending on location and then build up sufficient numbers and stores to allow successful swarming. The only trait really missing in the natural selection process is gentleness.

If you are a migratory beekeeper, moving bees every few months chasing the flow 12 months of the year then I doubt there would be any advantage in feral bees. In a stationary yard then local feral bees could have 200 years of selection to best survive in the local conditions.
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DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Potential new apiary
« Last post by omnimirage on January 20, 2018, 06:02:16 pm »
That's what I've been doing, I look at what they can find within 3 kilometers, and then assess if they were to go a little further out than optimum at 5 kilometers.

Currently I'm not doing migratory beekeeping. With not knowing how to drive a trailer, and having just a station wagon, and also not having enough knowledge to know where to move and set up bees, I'm just seeking to find a good site for bees and then leave them there set up. So if a site isn't good for much of the year, it's not worth me setting up there. My best, main site is more or less directly across from a forest, it's pretty lucrative.
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DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Buying honey distributors
« Last post by omnimirage on January 20, 2018, 05:57:54 pm »
Maybe that was a best case scenario, seems like her information might have been off.

ABK was the magazine with the buyers that she suggested. It's pretty pricey for a yearly subscription, can't seem to find second hand copies to buy eh.

Do you use the magazine yourself? I'm attending a local amateur bee club soon in about a month, I wonder if someone there will have access to a magazine that I can look through.

Well, thanks for confirming about that Bill. She told me that I could more or less easily find people wanting to pay $9 a kilo, and that I should therefore never sell honey for less than that. I mentioned that when I first started out I investigated those options, and saw these companies were only offering $4-6 a kilo so figured it wasn't worth it. She said that to sell honey at such a price is undercutting yourself. Seems like she might have unrealistic ideas, I'm a bit unsure either way.
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DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Potential new apiary
« Last post by eltalia on January 20, 2018, 05:19:47 pm »
Yeah that's what I meant......

What Jim said holds true, tho' for summer conditions here I would cut it back to 2 to 3km (~1.5mile) for optimum
production. Better to shift bees rather then have them fly it. And of course any site like you describe is only
migratory, to be treated as one would a monoculture. Many of our "scrub" trees flower years apart.
Like...
I cleaned up (housekeeping) before our Xmas jaunt around the continent to find on return maybe 5 trees close
by in full flower I had never seen before - in three years, they look like a cedar of sorts - and my lttle show
busting at the seams. Did I say I loathe working honey anytime, moreso on 40+C days..?.. I took the knife to
much of it as I couldn't be bothered with extraction. It gave the lil' buggers something to do over thinking about
heading for the hills...heh ;-))

Bill
29
DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Buying honey distributors
« Last post by eltalia on January 20, 2018, 05:12:45 pm »
$9.00 a kilo would be a pipe dream dream i beleave Capilano is paying $4.50 a kilo at the moment for 1st grade honey. the ABK has honey buyers from all over Aus.

Thanks Dave... I didn't wish to be the one to tell him brokerage is a whole new ballgame
for b'keeps. Himself and most of that ilk (sideliners) are way better off doing what they do
do. Jeff@Buderim knows the drill...Om could ask him over listening to whomever it is he is.

Bill
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DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Buying honey distributors
« Last post by Dave P on January 20, 2018, 04:22:44 pm »
$9.00 a kilo would be a pipe dream dream i beleave Capilano is paying $4.50 a kilo at the moment for 1st grade honey. the ABK has honey buyers from all over Aus.
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