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Hi Folks,

Se what I mean?

Someone step on this guy's air hose.



Sal

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You sound like a politician, Cider. Never say if he is right or wrong, just hedge around it.
Sussed out at last, mind you, I sussed you a long ago. But not as a politician. :smile:
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Back to the original intent of the bees setting up multiple swarming. How does this work? I am going to guess and assume  when things go according to bee plans, the bees turn one virgin loose? Allow her make her mating flight, return mated, gather enough bees and swarm, leaving the home hive making a new independent colony somewhere else. Then the nurse bees release one more virgin and the process is repeated until all multiple swarming is accomplished? Thanks for you both for your patience and sharing your knowledge.
Phillip

In large hives that are going to swarm multiple times, the first swarm is with the original queen.  This usually happens around the time that the queen cells are capped.  Leaving about a week for the virgins to hatch.  If the hive doesn't want to swarm again, the virgins hatch and fight it out until only one left.  That's when you see the sides of the queen cell cut out.  If the hive is going to swarm a second or third time, the first virgin(s) takes flight with the swarm.  That swarm finds a new home then the queen goes out on her mating flights.  The remaining queens settle thing among themselves after they are done swarming. 

In my case this spring, weather delayed the first swarm until the virgins were hatching which created a lot of confusion. 

As far as how long they are kept in the cells, I would say a few days to maybe a week at most.  I don't see any need for them to keep the locked in longer than that.  There is the need for the queen to get mated and start laying fairly quickly.

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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Comb Honey
« Last post by cao on Today at 12:39:39 am »
I don't know what hive manipulation needs to be done in the spring other than having a strong hive when the flow starts and make sure there's room in the boxes for the bees to work. 

In the video he uses shallow frames.  You can use medium frames and just leave a strip along the top for the bees to use as a guide to rebuild.  I use the cheap plastic clamshell containers.  The ones like he had in the video is a little bit pricey.  I think they run over $1 a piece. 
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Phillip,
I haven?t seen it but I would be willing to bet the bees are feeding the queens as they are guarding them and keeping them locked in. The only limit is how long they have until they mate.
Jim Altmiller

Thank you Jim, Cao, Mr Van.  It certainly looks like nature learned to bank virgins before mankind did!! Good information friends. Thanks for taking the time to respond and educate.
Phillip
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Comb Honey
« Last post by Ben Framed on December 15, 2019, 11:57:20 pm »
Good video Phillip. I wonder why he trims the burr comb so cleanly off the frames. I thought you'd want to leave a starter area for the bees next season. Unless he's using a wax foundation.

Van - I LOVE ross rounds. Haven't been able to get the bees to draw them out yet. 3 yrs trying. Not a strong enough flow here maybe. I'm going to try a new approach next season. Maybe I can get them to draw out the rounds.

Cool, Tim has a video talking about the rounds. Look for the video titled;
Beekeeper's Honeybees Making & Harvesting Comb Honey
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Comb Honey
« Last post by Ben Framed on December 15, 2019, 11:40:31 pm »
Thanks Mr Van, I had  considered mentioning the Ross rounds but due to the information that I had gathered similar to the results that Cool experienced, I skirted mentioning those because ParksMtnApiary already has customers in the waiting and I simply pointed to the sure thing.  But as you mentioned. If done properly and every jot and tildel is just right for the bees  to fill out  the Ross rounds, then yes by all means. In fact there is another system out now that produces comb honey in squares but the problems reported are less desirable than the rounds, from what I have read.
I have watched a video by Tim that features packaging theses same cut out squares. He places a beautiful information label on front and a beautiful blue ribbon that skirts the corners of the package in a diagonal angle that look  👀 irresponsible!  I would like to watch that video again myself!
By the way, I am thinking Tim gets $19.95 for each of these squares. Look on his web site for confirmation.
Phillip
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Mated Queens
« Last post by sawdstmakr on December 15, 2019, 10:38:05 pm »
Maybe so Xerox. Do established queens always swarm before virgins are hatched?
Yes if weather permits. Sometimes during bad weather they are not able to swarm and the bees will keep the queens in the cells until the swarm has left.
Jim Altmiller
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Mated Queens
« Last post by sawdstmakr on December 15, 2019, 10:32:44 pm »
Do bees swarm with virgin queens only in certain situations,  or do they swarm with at least one mated queen?



.

A primary swarm is the first swarm and the old queen leaves with the hive. After that if a hive swarms again it is a secondary swarm and the queen is a virgin. If there are more than one virgin queen in the swarm, they will wait until they are in the new hive before they fight to the death. Then she will mate.
Jim Altmiller
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Comb Honey
« Last post by CoolBees on December 15, 2019, 10:29:11 pm »
Good video Phillip. I wonder why he trims the burr comb so cleanly off the frames. I thought you'd want to leave a starter area for the bees next season. Unless he's using a wax foundation.

Van - I LOVE ross rounds. Haven't been able to get the bees to draw them out yet. 3 yrs trying. Not a strong enough flow here maybe. I'm going to try a new approach next season. Maybe I can get them to draw out the rounds.
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