Beemaster's International Beekeeping Forum

BEEKEEPING LEARNING CENTER => DISEASE & PEST CONTROL => Topic started by: CoolBees on January 15, 2019, 03:15:02 pm

Title: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 15, 2019, 03:15:02 pm
Here's a question: what are some good ways to control ants that invade the hives.

Here in Norcal we have these tiny ants (whose name I don't know) that invade by the billions. They seem to be too small for the bees to bite, and the bees seem to give up and just huddle pretty quick once invaded.

I've tried salt on the ground around the hive as well as on the blocks and hive stands - didn't work.

I've tried grease - that lasted 3 days in the dry season - they created a pathway of dead bodies over the grease on every stand.

There are hive stands with oil containers on each leg - as soon as the spiders built webs, the ants move on thru using them.

I've resorted to spraying (which I don't like) around and on the hive stand legs. The spray is what we use around the perimeter of the house. It lasts 12 months - it can't be good.

 ... what happens in nature? ... I've seen trees with feral (I suppose) bees around. How are they dealing with it?

Any other suggestions?
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: SiWolKe on January 15, 2019, 03:51:12 pm
The ferals are not provided with sugar water and the pollen they drop is quickly eaten in a tree by many insects, so this colonies are not so of interest to ants.

We don?t have your species here, perhaps they don?t go up the trees? Are they the ones which are called fireants?

You can try baking soda or soda powder for cleaning, mixed with powdered sugar, feed it to them but it?s a cruel death. They will carry it to the nest, the ants blow up and die. This does not poison the environement.

To be nicer you can use citrus oil or citrus peels and copper. Some ant species don?t like the smell. Combined with flooding the nests they might leave. Don?t spill sugar water at the hive and close the floor on the hive if it?s open, because the ants want the pollen dropping down.

I only have an ant problem when I feed sugar syrup, they drown by thousands in the top feeder. I have ants nests under the hives but never any ants inside. But I think they are a different kind of ants.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 15, 2019, 04:59:22 pm
I'm guessing it's the Argentine Ant.

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/johnson/amp/Meet-the-bad-ant-that-s-overwhelming-California-5719954.php

They are brutal. In the hive, they attack eggs, larvae of all stages, stores, and full grown bees. When they invade - its common to see 10-30 ants crawling on a single bee. They flood into a hive and cover everything.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Beeboy01 on January 15, 2019, 11:48:20 pm
As much as I hate to use it I make a perimeter of ant poison about ten feet out around my hives and gently rake it in so the dust doesn't get blown over to the hives. I only treat about once a year during the summer to keep the red bull carpenter ants at bay. Lost too many hives to ants and just go medieval on them when they appear.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Acebird on January 16, 2019, 09:52:04 am
Stop opening the hive and duct tape the seams when you do.  Don't drop and hive debris on the ground.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Beeboy01 on January 16, 2019, 11:07:31 am
Can't see how taping the seams would help with screened bottom boards and not opening the hives means you can't monitor them properly. Even if the seams are totally sealed and the hive has a solid bottom board the ants will still get in through the entrance.
  A poison ant bait would be the most effective way to stop them. Lightly spread it on the ground along the back of the hives, maybe a foot or two out. If you can find the main ant nest then treat that with a poison bait instead of around the hives. Like I said before, I would rather not use any poison in my bee yard but I've found the hard way sometimes it is the only way to save the hives from attack. Luck with it and let us know what happens.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 16, 2019, 01:11:52 pm
Stop opening the hive and duct tape the seams when you do.  Don't drop and hive debris on the ground.

That wouldn't solve anything I'm afraid.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 16, 2019, 01:14:37 pm
Thank you to everyone who responded.

So - its sounds like everyone is using chemicals  (of some type) to fight off the ants when they become a problem.

If there are any non-chemical solutions, I'd love to hear about them.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: SiWolKe on January 16, 2019, 01:23:06 pm
You can use a vaccuum cleaner every day o them...but beware they come out again.
 :wink:
 Perhaps use a blowtorch? But don?t burn your hives.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 16, 2019, 02:31:48 pm
You can use a vaccuum cleaner every day o them...but beware they come out again.
 :wink:
 Perhaps use a blowtorch? But don?t burn your hives.

  :happy:
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: robirot on January 16, 2019, 04:12:23 pm
Die you try cynamon between the boxes?
Else Borax in sugar/honey where the bees can't reach it.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: herbhome on January 16, 2019, 04:19:15 pm
I bought some of these at our farm supply. Works well and fills up with dead ants quickly.




https://www.amazon.com/TERRO-T300B-2-Pack-Liquid-Baits/dp/B00E4GACB8?keywords=ant+control&qid=1547669628&sr=8-5&ref=sr_1_5
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 16, 2019, 09:14:17 pm
SiWolKe  ~~   ''Are they the ones which are called fireants? ''

  I am wondering this also. Is the Argentine Ant the same ant as the Fire Ant?  I am thinking not. Fire ants have made there way into my area and so far they have not bothered my bees. The fire ants make a bigger mound that our native ant, and may I add, don't make the mistake of stepping on one of these mounds!! You will quickly find out why they are called fire ants!! HA HAA .
   
 
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: herbhome on January 17, 2019, 12:16:55 am
argentine ants are very small compared to fire ants which are large and red. I grew up in south Louisiana and know fire ants very well. They make mounds sometimes 3-4 feet high and are extremely aggresive to intrusion.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: TheHoneyPump on January 17, 2019, 01:09:56 am
CoolBees, you really have only three options to deal with ants:

1.  Physical barrier preventing any possible way for them to access the hive.  Think ant-vile moat.
2.  Encourage the ants to relocate.  Dig up and destroy nests.  Make nests uninhabitable, pour objectionable liquid or dusting into and around the area of the nests.
3.  Dispatch the source of the nests.  Kill the ants.  Bait and poison.

I read somewhere that the biomass of ants in the world out weighs the entire population of the human race. ... It is no wonder we can feel outnumbered and overwhelmed sometimes ;).  Another fun fact, ants and bees are distant cousins.

Not all ants are aggressive pests to the hive.  Most are merely scavengers cleaning up the ground beneath and around the hive and can be left alone.  However, when you see ants INSIDE the hive or on live bees or hauling eggs/larvae then action has to be taken.  Potentially helpful ants turned into problem ants.

Things that do not work, not well, or not long
- Diatomaceous earth
- Cinnamon
- Other such useless things


Things that do work, staying power, long or permanent help for the hive.
- Trim back vegetation and keep area around the hive tidy of overgrowth.
- A hive stand that emulates the moat concept. Not a single strand of grass can touch anywhere!
- Frequent nest destruction
- Hot soap water down the nest
- Used motor oil around and down the nest, and around the hive at a distance
- Bait/poison:  Borax mixed with corn syrup 2:1 and put in bait cups along ant trails. Wipes out all nests in the area in about 2 weeks.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pjw2A3QU8Qg


Hope that helps!
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: SiWolKe on January 17, 2019, 01:43:29 am
Quote
- Used motor oil around and down the nest, and around the hive at a distance

Be careful, this contaminates the ground water.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: robirot on January 17, 2019, 04:25:20 am
Liquid nitrogen down the Nest also works or casting the nest with molten Aluminium makes for cool structures.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Acebird on January 17, 2019, 08:13:19 am

2.  Encourage the ants to relocate.
- Frequent nest destruction

Although I have never lost a colony to ants I have had ants make nests on top of an inner cover that doesn't have a hand hole.  Usually this happens in early spring.
 About ever other day I would pull off the top cover and use the flat blade of the hive tool to shovel off the thousands of eggs the ants made on top of the cover.  In about a week they would give up.  I think you do need the ants for clean up outside the hive.  It is the man made hive and where it is placed that makes the bees vulnerable.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: TheHoneyPump on January 17, 2019, 12:20:57 pm
Liquid nitrogen down the Nest also works or casting the nest with molten Aluminium makes for cool structures.

On pouring aluminum. I have never done it, but I have seen some videos and the -ant art- displayed from them.  I find the ant structures more fascinating than the beehive.  Ants are utterly amazing.

https://youtu.be/IGJ2jMZ-gaI
 
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: SiWolKe on January 17, 2019, 12:28:03 pm
What about keeping some chicken running around?
Do they eat this ant species? My chicken love ants.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 17, 2019, 10:57:05 pm
 SEPTEMBER 2015  COSMOS
 A New Zealand study shows that Argentine ants, one the most invasive and damaging ant species in the world, host a virus that is associated with honeybee deaths.
Large colonies of the ants, Linepithema humile, are found on every continent except Antarctica.
They attack nesting birds, hatching eggs and other native fauna and quickly eliminate other ants from an infested area ? especially native ants which play an important role in the ecosystem.
The Argentine ants also rob commercial beehives and are significant pests in orchards. But the latest research, published in Biology Letters, suggests a more significant problem if they are carriers of disease.
Researchers from Victoria University of Wellington and the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) collaborated on the three year project, analysing genomic data from Argentine ant populations in New Zealand, Australia and Argentina.
They found Deformed Wing Virus, a pathogen linked to colony collapse in honeybees, was found in nearly all of New Zealand?s Argentine ant populations. This pathogen has been linked to colony collapse in honeybees.
Lead scientist, Professor Phil Lester from Victoria University of Wellington, says the large distribution of ants and their capacity to carry viruses that could prove devastating heightens researchers? concerns.
?This discovery tells us that Argentine ants are much more of a problem than we previously thought," Lester says.
"They host the same Deformed Wing Virus strain found in bees and wasps in New Zealand, and this virus has cod.
"Argentine ants are known to raid beehives and also forage in the same environment as honey bees. Such close contact is bad for bees, as their association promotes pathogen exchange, he said.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 17, 2019, 11:03:43 pm
SEPTEMBER 2015  COSMOS
 A New Zealand study shows that Argentine ants, one the most invasive and damaging ant species in the world, host a virus that is associated with honeybee deaths.
Large colonies of the ants, Linepithema humile, are found on every continent except Antarctica.
They attack nesting birds, hatching eggs and other native fauna and quickly eliminate other ants from an infested area ? especially native ants which play an important role in the ecosystem.
The Argentine ants also rob commercial beehives and are significant pests in orchards. But the latest research, published in Biology Letters, suggests a more significant problem if they are carriers of disease.
Researchers from Victoria University of Wellington and the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) collaborated on the three year project, analysing genomic data from Argentine ant populations in New Zealand, Australia and Argentina.
They found Deformed Wing Virus, a pathogen linked to colony collapse in honeybees, was found in nearly all of New Zealand?s Argentine ant populations. This pathogen has been linked to colony collapse in honeybees.
Lead scientist, Professor Phil Lester from Victoria University of Wellington, says the large distribution of ants and their capacity to carry viruses that could prove devastating heightens researchers? concerns.
?This discovery tells us that Argentine ants are much more of a problem than we previously thought," Lester says.
"They host the same Deformed Wing Virus strain found in bees and wasps in New Zealand, and this virus has cod.
"Argentine ants are known to raid beehives and also forage in the same environment as honey bees. Such close contact is bad for bees, as their association promotes pathogen exchange, he said.

Ace, Is this the type ant that was in you hive? Did they attack your bees?
 
SiWolKe,  Chickens sound good to me,  I didn't know that chickens would eat ants, but why not, they eat everything and you have seen it yourself. Looks like a winner to me. I know that David at Barnyard bees uses them to attack hive beetle larva which attempt to burrow around his hives. He has a video on this.

Mr Claude This is the first video that I have seen on this . My cousin was telling me about this process a few months ago. Very interesting. After the fellow finished pouring, I was reminded of a volcano with the smoking around the summit.  :grin:
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: herbhome on January 17, 2019, 11:17:38 pm
What about keeping some chicken running around?
Do they eat this ant species? My chicken love ants.

I have a semi feral flock of bantam chickens and a few guineas. They run loose and roost where they please. They eat a lot of bugs all summer including ants and SHB larva dropping out of hives. I toss a little scratch under the hives every week to keep them coming around.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 17, 2019, 11:25:41 pm
UT NEWS
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
May 16, 2013
   When you talk to folks who live in the invaded areas, they tell you they want their fire ants back,? said LeBrun. ?Fire ants are in many ways very polite. They live in your yard. They form mounds and stay there, and they only interact with you if you step on their mound.
  LeBrun said that crazy ants, by contrast, ?go everywhere. They invade people?s homes, nest in crawl spaces and walls, become incredibly abundant and damage electrical equipment.
  The crazy ants were first discovered in the U.S. in 2002 by a pest control operator in a suburb of Houston, and have since established populations in 21 counties in Texas, 20 counties in Florida, and a few sites in southern Mississippi and southern Louisiana.
  In 2012 the species was formally identified as Nylanderia fulva, which is native to northern Argentina and southern Brazil. Frequently referred to as Rasberry crazy ants, these ants recently have been given the official common name Tawny crazy ants.
  The Tawny crazy ant invasion is the most recent in a series of ant invasions from South America brought on by human movement. The Argentine ant invaded through the port of New Orleans in about 1891. In 1918 the black imported fire ant showed up in Mobile, Ala. Then in the 1930s, the red imported fire ant arrived in the U.S. and began displacing the black fire ant and the Argentine ants.
  The UT researchers studied two crazy ant invasion sites on the Texas Gulf Coast and found that in those areas where the Tawny crazy ant population is densest, fire ants were also eliminated or diminished. Even in regions where the crazy ant population is less dense, fire ant populations were drastically reduced. Other ant species, particularly native species, were also eliminated or diminished.

If you wish to finish reading this article, simply google the above heading and title and you should be able to find it in its entirety.

Phillip Hall "Ben Framed"
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 17, 2019, 11:34:32 pm
What about keeping some chicken running around?
Do they eat this ant species? My chicken love ants.

I have a semi feral flock of bantam chickens and a few guineas. They run loose and roost where they please. They eat a lot of bugs all summer including ants and SHB larva dropping out of hives. I toss a little scratch under the hives every week to keep them coming around.

herbhome .  Which seem to do the best job of catching the ants? Pretty well equal?


Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 17, 2019, 11:40:24 pm
Excellent response HP - Thank you!

... I read somewhere that the biomass of ants in the world out weighs the entire population of the human race. ... It is no wonder we can feel outnumbered and overwhelmed sometimes ;).  Another fun fact, ants and bees are distant cousins. ...

Cool facts! I did not know that Ants and Bees had relations that close, but it makes sense.



... However, when you see ants INSIDE the hive or on live bees or hauling eggs/larvae then action has to be taken.  ...

That is exactly what these ants do.



Not a single strand of grass can touch anywhere!

True. I learned that one the hard way.




- Bait/poison:  Borax mixed with corn syrup 2:1 and put in bait cups along ant trails. Wipes out all nests in the area in about 2 weeks.

This is what I'm going to try this summer. Maybe that's the golden ticket :)



Hope that helps!

It did!

Alan
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 17, 2019, 11:42:39 pm
What about keeping some chicken running around?
Do they eat this ant species? My chicken love ants.

We keep about 60 chickens and sell organic eggs. The hives are around the area of the Coop, and we turn the chickens loose most afternoons. These ants are too small, and too many I think. The chickens don't seem to make a dent in them.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 17, 2019, 11:46:35 pm
... I toss a little scratch under the hives every week to keep them coming around. ...

That is a great idea. I hadn't thought of it. Thanks.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 17, 2019, 11:53:47 pm
Mr Claude, We as kids here in the South, learned that tune but as When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again..  along with different words of corse.
 :grin:
https://youtu.be/Fq6oyN7L3Qs
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Acebird on January 18, 2019, 08:47:15 am
I toss a little scratch under the hives every week to keep them coming around.
It has been my experience that animals in general get tired of the same old thing.  A couple of years ago we had a major infestation of Japanese beetles (they are cyclic).  My wife would hand pluck them and toss them in a pail or bowl of water and then feed them to the chickens.  The chickens devoured them.  Last year they wouldn't even look twice at them.  I think you will have the same issue with trying to control ants with the chicken as the predator.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Live Oak on January 18, 2019, 10:45:47 am
I keep a couple of cans of Amdro in the Kubota and treat every fire ant mound I see.  I go though a lot of Amdro but it works.  For the ants that I find already in my hives, I use Walmart Supertech Brake Cleaner to kill them.  It soaks down in between the wood pieces of the inner covers and any hollowed out wood and kills the ants on contact.  It evaporates very quickly, almost immediately in hot weather and leaves NO chemical residue.  Just DO NOT spray it inside the hive or where it can directly contact the bees.  The bees instinctively stay away from it due to the odor of the fumes while evaporating.  It is CHEAP......about $2 per 14 oz. can and works great. 
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 18, 2019, 10:56:21 am
I keep a couple of cans of Amdro in the Kubota and treat every fire ant mound I see.  I go though a lot of Amdro but it works.  For the ants that I find already in my hives, I use Walmart Supertech Brake Cleaner to kill them.  It soaks down in between the wood pieces of the inner covers and any hollowed out wood and kills the ants on contact.  It evaporates very quickly, almost immediately in hot weather and leaves NO chemical residue.  Just DO NOT spray it inside the hive or where it can directly contact the bees.  The bees instinctively stay away from it due to the odor of the fumes while evaporating.  It is CHEAP......about $2 per 14 oz. can and works great.

I am wondering if it will also detour Small Hive Beetles?
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 18, 2019, 12:41:53 pm
... It has been my experience that animals in general get tired of the same old thing. ....

Now that you mention it, I would concur. My wife and I used to pick the large snails after a rain, and feed them to the chickens, 5 gallon buckets at a time. The chickens would go nuts. Now they don't even look at them.

On another note - we don't see many snails any more. The ants eat them too.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 18, 2019, 12:50:18 pm
These ants are unique. They don't have a traditional nest, like most ants I've known. We find their eggs/nests everywhere we dig. Especially in the root balls of potted plants - jades, lillies, blueberries, etc. I've gotten to where I flood the pots prior to working any plant - if the ants pour out of the flood, there's eggs below.

They are under any concrete in high numbers. After the 1st rain in the fall, they come out and die by the millions. Last fall I swept a 5 gallon bucket full of dead ant bodies off the concrete on 1 side of the house after the 1st rain. ... then I gave up, and switched to the leaf blower. 2 days later the queens swarmed. There were 10's of thousands. Maybe more. I have a feeling that 2019 is going to be the "Year of the Ant" here.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on January 18, 2019, 01:19:35 pm
These ants are unique. They don't have a traditional nest, like most ants I've known. We find their eggs/nests everywhere we dig. Especially in the root balls of potted plants - jades, lillies, blueberries, etc. I've gotten to where I flood the pots prior to working any plant - if the ants pour out of the flood, there's eggs below.

They are under any concrete in high numbers. After the 1st rain in the fall, they come out and die by the millions. Last fall I swept a 5 gallon bucket full of dead ant bodies off the concrete on 1 side of the house after the 1st rain. ... then I gave up, and switched to the leaf blower. 2 days later the queens swarmed. There were 10's of thousands. Maybe more. I have a feeling that 2019 is going to be the "Year of the Ant" here.

Wow, I am sorry you have to deal with that. We don't have them here in North Mississippi as far as my knowledge, and don't want them !!
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 18, 2019, 01:38:25 pm
I hope you don't get them also.

From the SFGATE article. ...
Quote
... It's considered one of the most invasive species on the planet. ... The ants ... are part of a single super colony that extends from Oregon to Mexico, Fisher says.  ...

When I posted this thread, I hadn't realized that we were dealing with something unique here. The only good news (I guess) is that you won't find an invasion that large in nature for very long. Something will come along to balance the equation.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: herbhome on January 18, 2019, 09:25:06 pm
herbhome .  Which seem to do the best job of catching the ants? Pretty well equal?

I would guess chickens on SHB larva and pupae as they scratch down into the dirt and guineas really don't scratch much. On ants about equal. They both eat seed ticks so I doubt that ants are too small for them. :smile:
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: blackforest beekeeper on January 19, 2019, 02:49:42 am
These ants are unique. They don't have a traditional nest, like most ants I've known. We find their eggs/nests everywhere we dig. Especially in the root balls of potted plants - jades, lillies, blueberries, etc. I've gotten to where I flood the pots prior to working any plant - if the ants pour out of the flood, there's eggs below.

They are under any concrete in high numbers. After the 1st rain in the fall, they come out and die by the millions. Last fall I swept a 5 gallon bucket full of dead ant bodies off the concrete on 1 side of the house after the 1st rain. ... then I gave up, and switched to the leaf blower. 2 days later the queens swarmed. There were 10's of thousands. Maybe more. I have a feeling that 2019 is going to be the "Year of the Ant" here.

You might consider cheapening your life and eat what is there.

 :wink:
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: robirot on January 19, 2019, 04:19:02 am
Maybe get an Anteater as a new pet?
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 19, 2019, 04:49:27 pm
Maybe get an Anteater as a new pet?

Now that's funny! Why didn't I think of it???  :happy:

There's a bird eating the ants, lots of them. Not sure what type of bird. Looks like a Wren in an olive green color. Very pretty. I tried to get a picture - no luck so far. He moves too fast.  :happy:
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: robirot on January 19, 2019, 04:52:47 pm


Maybe get an Anteater as a new pet?

Now that's funny! Why didn't I think of it???  :happy:

There are these little furry ones, maybe thats zhe perfect one.
Title: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: TheHoneyPump on January 19, 2019, 04:55:53 pm
For the level of infestation you describe around your property, the suggestion is the bait method.  Drop teaspoon sized globs strategically around the property. Near nests and trails.  It will take 2weeks minimum to effect.  A month later you should notice a significant difference.

2+:1 borax to corn syrup. You could further spike it a bit with some white sugar to enhance sweetness.  Heat the syrup to 150 degF (est).  Stir in the borax.  Add as much as it will take until is a smooth paste.  Let cool.  It will become like a taffy.   Head out to the yard and gleefully dispense.  ;)

The borax is harmless to most animals and birds, but is deadly on insects such as ants.  As with any bait, place with care so the targeted pests easily gets it and yet to minimize collateral effects to others.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on January 20, 2019, 03:44:57 am
I will do that HP, and thank you.

Right now, the Ant population has been knocked back because of the rains - per usual. By August/September time, after several months without rain, they will be in full bloom and getting aggressive. By then, they start to turn the swimming pool black, and clog the filters. That's when I'll hit them - and they will attack any food source. Thank you for the recipe. I'll update once I've tried it and have some results.

Alan
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Haveuseen1? on February 01, 2019, 04:55:06 pm
We have "fire ants" and they will invade the hive and remove eggs, honey and anything else they want.  The bees try to keep them away, but the ants will come in after dark and get a head start on the bees.  We use a granular insect killer spread around the legs.  It usually lasts around 6 weeks, slightly shorter if we get a lot of rain.  I did try the bait stations and I think they worked well.  I might try that again this spring to change it up a little.  My stands are concrete blocks with 4x4s runing through he top hole. I just placed the baitstations on top of the 4x4 in the block.  I think the ease of the granules is nice though.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: sawdstmakr on February 04, 2019, 12:32:12 am
Coolbees,
It sounds like you have Crazy Raspberry Ants.
A neighbor of mine has CRAs. They were imported from Texas by his closest neighbor when he moved here from Texas with all his horse equipment. They are attracted to electrical currents. They were so bad that they shut down the NASA Space Station in Houston.
Jim
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: MikeyN.C. on February 11, 2019, 02:27:49 pm
CoolBee,
You can take the small disposable 50 count plastic aspirin bottles . Drill 1/6 inch holes around top just under screw on lid. Make a batch of grape,apple jelly with borax mixed in,  use baby spoon and drop in 4 spoon's full,  put cap on and dispense through out yard . You can paint them black so they're not that visible.  Works good , even if wind blows them down.
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on February 11, 2019, 03:15:10 pm
Mike, thanks for that suggestion. I'm going to try each of the ideas provided here as soon as the ants start their buildup in warmer weather. Already I'm seeing them building. We've had above average rainfall this yr. Once things dry out, they get aggressive - that's when I plan on targeting them hard. I'll post how each treatment works in a few months.

Alan
Title: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: TheHoneyPump on February 18, 2019, 10:09:32 pm
May I suggest you deliberately go on the offensive one month before you expect them to be peaking and becoming a problem.  The bait method is a sustained systemic treatment on the colonies that takes time to effect.  There is quite a delay from when it is put out to when the population really gets knocked back.  If you wait until you notice that they are out in force, then you are 2 weeks to a month too late at having the ideal pre-emptive Impact.
Historically, year to year, when have they become noticeable in mass numbers? Put the bait stations out a month before that.
You will know it worked, is working, and you timed it right when you feel like you wasted your time and effort doing so because there are few to no ants around this season. ;)

Imho
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Ben Framed on July 23, 2019, 09:20:01 pm
I bought some of these at our farm supply. Works well and fills up with dead ants quickly.




https://www.amazon.com/TERRO-T300B-2-Pack-Liquid-Baits/dp/B00E4GACB8?keywords=ant+control&qid=1547669628&sr=8-5&ref=sr_1_5

Herbhome, does this work for carpenter ants?
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: sawdstmakr on July 23, 2019, 11:30:06 pm
I use this.

https://www.amazon.com/T1812-Outdoor-Liquid-Killer-Stakes/dp/B00GRTNRJ4/ref=mp_s_a_1_9?keywords=ant+control&qid=1563934936&s=gateway&sr=8-9

Around my hives I put a plastic jar over it so that the bees do not try to use it. It is sugar water and  boric acid. You place it right along the ant trail. My buddy had a severe carpenter ant problem with them going in his house. He put it where they were entering and he swears by it.
Jim Altmiller
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on October 17, 2019, 03:19:52 pm
I wanted to follow-up on this thread.

1st - Thank you to everyone who replied.

I tried several recipes this summer to see which the Ants preferred. The one I found that works in my area is as follows: 1 part honey, 2 parts water, & 1 part borax - heated and stirred till everything is dissolved. I place a tablespoon or 2 into jars, and drilled .201" diam holes in the lids. I placed about 20 jars strategically around the prooerty in Ant-Problem area. The ants seemed to like this a lot. I would estimate that Ant activity is down by 80%+ over the course of the summer.

All recipes with borax & sugar, or corn syrup failed miserably. They never touched it.

We had our first good rain (a little early) a couple weeks ago, and a 2nd rain last night - usually after the first rain of the season, the ants come pouring out of the ground by the millions (billions?) to die. I have not seen an Ant after either rain - so, keeping my fingers crossed. Trees that were covered with ants year-round now seem to be nearly devoid of them (silk trees, curly willows, etc). I will continue to monitor them.

So ... hoping this helps someone ...
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: Michael Bush on October 17, 2019, 04:13:01 pm
I'll bet honey did work well.  I do cheap grape jelly.  I think it needs some smell both to attract the ants and to help the ants recruit more ants.  Plain syrup or corn syrup don't have much smell...
Title: Re: A question about controlling ANTS
Post by: CoolBees on October 17, 2019, 07:39:00 pm
...  I think it needs some smell both to attract the ants and to help the ants recruit more ants.  Plain syrup or corn syrup don't have much smell...

Yes - that was my experience also. They did not touch or find things that they couldn't smell. My theory was, if they love the hives so much, maybe they'd be attracted to the smell of honey. It worked.