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Author Topic: Beehive stands  (Read 958 times)

Offline rast

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2021, 09:32:27 pm »
Njce!
[/quote]

 Hive stands or turkeys in the back?
Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda

Online Ben Framed

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2021, 09:42:41 pm »
Both 😊
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2021, 12:09:53 pm »
Due to environmental issues (I'm in a very wet and humid climate area), I primarily use just cinder blocks as they won't rot, sag, rust or lose strength over time like wood or iron.  They're cheap enough and tolerate reasonable abuse moving them around.  In a few circumstances (very uneven ground), I use cinderblocks with multiple 10' 2x4's to make a stand to hold 5-6 hives (8-frame hives & 5-frame NUC's).

Offline Major_in_MS

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2021, 08:02:14 pm »
Quick and easy.   T-posts, U-bolts, and 4x4 posts.  Took me about 30 minutes to set this one up from start to finish.  This hive stand is really great for a sloping lot. 

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The 8 frame supers are actually top feeders that will be removed once my packages draw out the foundations.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2021, 08:42:14 am »
Major, if those hives amount to anything they could all topple over with the weight of honey.  The fence post will sink unevenly.
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Just do it

Offline Beelab

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2021, 09:02:45 am »
Argh.

Offline Major_in_MS

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2021, 09:41:56 pm »
Major, if those hives amount to anything they could all topple over with the weight of honey.  The fence post will sink unevenly.

Hmmm, you may be right, I guess I'll carry a bag of ready mix over there and pour some collars around those posts to keep them from sinking.

This is a modified design of the one Frederick Dunn uses.  He claims to have been using this type of hive stand for 12 years without any problems.  His design uses metal electrical conduit instead of wooden posts and he uses a set of t-posts between each hive along the stand.  He likes to run a ratchet strap over each hive too.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 10:25:20 pm by Major_in_MS »

Offline Acebird

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Re: Beehive stands
« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2021, 09:07:32 am »
If your soil is rocky enough you might be OK but the post are designed to be driven in the ground easily.  If you cast the collar with a hole in the center you can slip it over the post and put a bolt thorough the nearest hole and then tap it down until the bolt touches your cast block.  Then you can move and reuse.  It wouldn't hurt to X brace the polls so the whole thing doesn't rock in the wind.  Fence wire is good enough.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it