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Author Topic: Hive Losses - Vermont  (Read 426 times)

Offline max2

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Hive Losses - Vermont
« on: February 04, 2024, 01:08:30 am »

Offline Kathyp

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Re: Hive Losses - Vermont
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2024, 11:22:42 am »
It would be really interesting and I don't know if the data or records exist, to know average losses over a long period of time.  Like 100 years or something like that. 

Harsh weather climates VS milder climates, etc.

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Offline beesnweeds

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Everyone loves a worker.... until its laying.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Hive Losses - Vermont
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2024, 01:04:09 pm »
https://youtu.be/0Qb5Poy_MJA?si=u-mYJHhbJb9tPn-x

Mike 'specifically' breaks the pesticide and herbicide 'number' down four in pollen. "In high amounts" he says.


"Celebrating 50 years in the beekeeping industry, Mike Palmer, a famous beekeeper in Vermont State, walked through his apiary with Dr. Humberto Boncristiani for an interview on the InsideTheHive.tv podcast. The two discussed the changes in the beekeeping industry over the last 50 years, including the shift from American foulbrood to trachea mites and later on Varroa mites. The conversation also touched on the effects of pesticides on bee populations, with Mike sharing his concerns about the high levels of atrazine and other herbicides found in pollen samples collected from hives in row crop agriculture areas.

For a long time, Mike didn't believe pesticides were affecting his colonies, but this is not the case anymore. Mike described why he changed his mind and explained why he thinks pesticides are indeed a big problem for beekeepers.

Mike also shared his approach to beekeeping, which includes the use of dedicated brood factories to rapidly expand the brood nest. These factories are not meant to produce honey but to quickly grow the population of nurse bees. By using this method, Mike can maintain high production levels without having to use production hives to stop his cell builders.

This podcast provides valuable insights into the world of beekeeping and the challenges that beekeepers face today. It highlights the importance of understanding the needs of bees and the impact that human activities can have on their survival."
2 Chronicles 7:14
14 If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Hive Losses - Vermont
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2024, 07:26:20 am »
If you want a measurement of pesticide losses, try making a frame covered in white sheet and putting it in front of your hives.  You will see how the number of dead bees goes up right after a pesticide spray.  It's hard to tell when they just land in the grass.
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Offline max2

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Re: Hive Losses - Vermont
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2024, 06:20:56 pm »
It is always sad to hear of pesticide losses.
There are no crops anywere near my bees which require spraying .
There is one dairy left  and the rest of the land is beef cattle and bush.

 

anything