Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Bees on flowers  (Read 9262 times)

Online Terri Yaki

  • Super Bee
  • *****
  • Posts: 1688
  • Gender: Male
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2024, 09:12:48 pm »
So when they store nectar, they keep it separated by source?

Online The15thMember

  • Global Moderator
  • Galactic Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 4598
  • Gender: Female
  • Traveler of the Multiverse, Seeker of Knowledge
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2024, 09:32:45 pm »
Correct, which is one of the reasons why beekeepers are able to get monofloral honey varieties.  The different colored honey cells are sometimes very noticeable if a darker and lighter variety are coming in around the same time.  It's also why it makes me kind of upset when people harvest all their honey once a year and then mix it all together.  I mean, the bees went to all that work to keep the different flavors separate!   
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline beelife

  • New Bee
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Gender: Male
    • BeeLife
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2024, 05:41:14 am »
Bee on flower of Apple tree (Malus domestica)

The average production of honey is 20-30 kg per hectare.


Offline BeeMaster2

  • Administrator
  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 13624
  • Gender: Male
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2024, 09:12:42 am »
Reagan,
Honey bees will visit one species of flower until it runs out. But that doesn?t mean that all of the bees in the hive are only visiting that one species. One group is going to one area, controlled by the scouts that found the flowers, and others are following where other scouts found a good source of nectar.
Jim Altmiller

Democracy is 2 wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote.
Ben Franklin

Online The15thMember

  • Global Moderator
  • Galactic Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 4598
  • Gender: Female
  • Traveler of the Multiverse, Seeker of Knowledge
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2024, 07:49:45 pm »
But that doesn?t mean that all of the bees in the hive are only visiting that one species.
I'm aware, and which is why I mentioned light and dark varieties coming in at the same time.  I was under the impression that the foragers who are evaporating the nectar also keep the varieties separated, but I suppose that would depend on the order in which they unload the returning foragers.  So during low flow situations or times when a two or more flows are of equal strength, I guess there would be a mix of nectars in any given cell.  Correct?     
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 19971
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2024, 05:32:59 am »
>If that report is accurate then there is a good chance the paint contained lead.

Whatever they were painting Ford tractors with back in the 60s probably.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin