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Author Topic: Bees on flowers  (Read 10531 times)

Offline beelife

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Bees on flowers
« on: March 02, 2024, 12:28:19 pm »
Scilla bifolia.

It's very common in Eastern Europe and has a very nice dark blue pollen.
The image is shoot today.

Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2024, 12:46:16 pm »
Nice! Does that make blue honey?

Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2024, 02:33:53 pm »
Probably not.  :smile:
I don't think a natural honey can be blue.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2024, 02:58:44 pm »
Beautiful!  I bet it's fun to see that blue pollen in the cells though!  :grin:
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Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2024, 01:18:59 pm »
Beautiful!  I bet it's fun to see that blue pollen in the cells though!  :grin:
Yes, the pollen looks very nice in the cells.
Unfortunately I didn't shoot any photo of it.
Maybe next year.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2024, 01:51:37 pm »
I hear that kudzu makes purple honey.  Back when we had a bee inspector, he said he once saw blue pollen in a hive and asked the beekeeper where he thought it was coming from.  The farmer said, you won't believe it unless you see it and took him to a barn nearby where the bees were collecting the paint off of an old tractor...
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Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2024, 04:04:54 am »
I hear that kudzu makes purple honey.  Back when we had a bee inspector, he said he once saw blue pollen in a hive and asked the beekeeper where he thought it was coming from.  The farmer said, you won't believe it unless you see it and took him to a barn nearby where the bees were collecting the paint off of an old tractor...

Blue pollen is not something unussual. If you zoom my first picture you can see the blue pollen on the bee foot. Also, the pollen of this flower is blue.

About blue honey, I think is from grapes or berries.

In my area, when we have drought in the fall is very common to see bees on grapes, but only after a hornet cut it first.
Also, on drought, the concetration of sugar in grapes is very big and very appealing for bees.

All the best.  :smile:

 

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2024, 05:37:28 am »
In the South of North America we have a plant called Kudzu.  It grows so fast you can watch it grow.  It produces purple honey.
https://www.quora.com/What-is-purple-honey
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Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2024, 09:26:11 am »
Kudzo, another gift from Asia. It came with good intentions but now it's out of hand.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2024, 10:16:06 am »
We brought it over during the depression.  We were told that it was a good forage crop.  The story about how to plant it from that era was this:  Empty the shot out of a shotgun shell.  Fill it full of Kudzu seeds.  Go out at midnight so your neighbors don't see you.  Aim the shotgun at about a 45 degree angle and shoot.  Run as fast as you can back to the house so the Kudzu doesn't overtake you.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2024, 04:24:34 am »
Veronica polita
Tiny flowers, but very visited by bees.

Offline Dora

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2024, 11:33:57 am »
I hear that kudzu makes purple honey.  Back when we had a bee inspector, he said he once saw blue pollen in a hive and asked the beekeeper where he thought it was coming from.  The farmer said, you won't believe it unless you see it and took him to a barn nearby where the bees were collecting the paint off of an old tractor...
:shocked: Bees put paint in their combs and "pollen" in combs is supposed to be healthy?? :rolleyes:
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Online Ben Framed

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2024, 11:48:35 am »
Quote
author=Michael Bush link=topic=57194.msg527977#msg527977 date=1710422166]
We brought it over during the depression.  We were told that it was a good forage crop.  The story about how to plant it from that era was this:  Empty the shot out of a shotgun shell.  Fill it full of Kudzu seeds.  Go out at midnight so your neighbors don't see you.  Aim the shotgun at about a 45 degree angle and shoot.  Run as fast as you can back to the house so the Kudzu doesn't overtake you.

Mmmmm lol  :grin: 

But honestly, horses love it!
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Online Ben Framed

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2024, 12:01:24 pm »
I hear that kudzu makes purple honey.  Back when we had a bee inspector, he said he once saw blue pollen in a hive and asked the beekeeper where he thought it was coming from.  The farmer said, you won't believe it unless you see it and took him to a barn nearby where the bees were collecting the paint off of an old tractor...
:shocked: Bees put paint in their combs and "pollen" in combs is supposed to be healthy?? :rolleyes:

If that report is accurate then there is a good chance the paint contained lead.

JP did a removal video a few years ago where he found either blue, green, or purple color, (I can't remember which color for sure). I am thinking he said the removal was close to a zoo where snow combs were discarded in the waste and he suspected the bees got the color there...
Matthew 10:16
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Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.

Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2024, 12:30:18 pm »
Quote
author=Michael Bush link=topic=57194.msg527977#msg527977 date=1710422166]
We brought it over during the depression.  We were told that it was a good forage crop.  The story about how to plant it from that era was this:  Empty the shot out of a shotgun shell.  Fill it full of Kudzu seeds.  Go out at midnight so your neighbors don't see you.  Aim the shotgun at about a 45 degree angle and shoot.  Run as fast as you can back to the house so the Kudzu doesn't overtake you.

Mmmmm lol  :grin: 

But honestly, horses love it!
I've heard that goats do too. But that would be no surprise.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2024, 01:05:41 pm »
:shocked: Bees put paint in their combs and "pollen" in combs is supposed to be healthy?? :rolleyes:
Something like this would usually only happen if there was nothing else for the bees to collect.

I've heard that goats do too. But that would be no surprise.
Why do you say that, Terri?!  Are you one of those racial profilers who believes goats eat tin cans!!  :angry:

:cheesy:  Just kidding.  And goats do love kudzu.  :grin:
« Last Edit: March 24, 2024, 05:37:18 pm by The15thMember »
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Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2024, 05:20:16 pm »
Beautiful!  I bet it's fun to see that blue pollen in the cells though!  :grin:
This is the pollen from Scilla bifolia.
Looks more purple in this image, but two weeks ago was more blue. And I'm pretty sure is the same pollen.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2024, 05:38:40 pm »
Oooo!  It's so pretty!  I love how a frame of different colored pollen looks like a stained glass window.  :happy:
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Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2024, 06:10:25 pm »
So when they eat that, do they stick to the same color or do they mix it up? I never mix jelly bean colors, I'm a purist. :cool:

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2024, 07:20:12 pm »
I never mix jelly bean colors, I'm a purist. :cool:
Agreed!

So when they eat that, do they stick to the same color or do they mix it up?
I'd imagine they do, since variety in the diet is important.  Also pollen foragers put their own pollen loads away when they get home, unlike honey foragers, who pass their load off to a house bee for storage.  Does anyone know if different pollen varieties are sometimes mixed in the cells?  Or are they separated like nectar varieties?  I seem to remember something about pollen sometimes being mixed, but I'm not sure.     
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Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2024, 09:12:48 pm »
So when they store nectar, they keep it separated by source?

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2024, 09:32:45 pm »
Correct, which is one of the reasons why beekeepers are able to get monofloral honey varieties.  The different colored honey cells are sometimes very noticeable if a darker and lighter variety are coming in around the same time.  It's also why it makes me kind of upset when people harvest all their honey once a year and then mix it all together.  I mean, the bees went to all that work to keep the different flavors separate!   
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Offline beelife

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2024, 05:41:14 am »
Bee on flower of Apple tree (Malus domestica)

The average production of honey is 20-30 kg per hectare.


Offline BeeMaster2

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2024, 09:12:42 am »
Reagan,
Honey bees will visit one species of flower until it runs out. But that doesn?t mean that all of the bees in the hive are only visiting that one species. One group is going to one area, controlled by the scouts that found the flowers, and others are following where other scouts found a good source of nectar.
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2024, 07:49:45 pm »
But that doesn?t mean that all of the bees in the hive are only visiting that one species.
I'm aware, and which is why I mentioned light and dark varieties coming in at the same time.  I was under the impression that the foragers who are evaporating the nectar also keep the varieties separated, but I suppose that would depend on the order in which they unload the returning foragers.  So during low flow situations or times when a two or more flows are of equal strength, I guess there would be a mix of nectars in any given cell.  Correct?     
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Bees on flowers
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2024, 05:32:59 am »
>If that report is accurate then there is a good chance the paint contained lead.

Whatever they were painting Ford tractors with back in the 60s probably.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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