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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / This is interesting
« Last post by TheHoneyPump on December 01, 2022, 10:13:21 pm »
If you see no need or benefit for them, then I would brush them into a tub of soapy water - or sweep them into a nuc box and sell/give away to a competent keeper who can properly deal with the potential issues ahead. 
That does yourself, and your bee neighbours a favour.  1) If they are loaded with mites, you control/eliminate the problem before they can drift into nearby colonies and infest them.  2) if they have suicidal swarmy genetic tendencies, you can eliminate/reduce the gene problem before they can procreate with nearby colonies.
Win-Win : no downside. 

If you leave them?  My wager is the size will trickle as the bees drift and beg into the hive they are sitting on or one nearby.  If there is a queen, eventually there will be a tennis ball there until they just outright abandon her and move into the hive with all the other bees.  She will perish from exposure or be killed trying to enter the hive.

2c
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: This is interesting
« Last post by Bill Murray on December 01, 2022, 10:01:30 pm »
So even if i put them in a box, treated them , then have to get them through winter. If they dont make it what a waste of time No?
 

And i know someones going to say its free bees. come feb I got all the free bees I want with queens from stock I want. Not some mite infested junk that I have to treat and try to coax through winter.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: This is interesting
« Last post by Ben Framed on December 01, 2022, 07:39:44 pm »
Stick them in a box and treat them with OAV, it would be a good time since there is no brood.

Thats what I do G3...
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: This is interesting
« Last post by G3farms on December 01, 2022, 07:01:03 pm »
Stick them in a box and treat them with OAV, it would be a good time since there is no brood.
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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES FORUM / Re: Gold prospecting using a metal detector
« Last post by Lesgold on December 01, 2022, 05:53:32 pm »
Struggled to find much on my last outing. The bush was really overgrown in this area. Still, it all adds up.

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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Tigers
« Last post by TheHoneyPump on December 01, 2022, 01:38:13 pm »
When raising our own queens, a side effect is it promotes the genetic diversity of the apiary and of the area surrounding it.  My experience has been that The best hives in terms of health and productivity are the ones when you pull up a frame and see three or more different bee colour patterns walking around - including diversity in queen  colours.
This is why it is often said that the best queens are not the ones bought but the ones raised yourself.  It is not because you did a better job raising them.  They are better because of the local diversity and the queens do not go through the strains of caging and transport etc.
However, an equally possible negative side effect of raising own queens is that local diversity and subsequent gene dilution. There will be duds. There will be meanies. There will be loafers. There will be the feeble. Be prepared to cull those promptly and without remorse. When you start raising your own, you have to become committed to Promote only the excellence in your apiary, and dispatch the mediocre. Base that on behaviour and performance - ignoring colour of the queens and bees. Follow those markers and it will not be long that your boxes are full of your own premium select super-bees.

Yes, The tigers are harder to find on a frame covered of bees. But they sure are pretty.


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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: This is interesting
« Last post by Bill Murray on December 01, 2022, 01:22:11 pm »
No think not.

Probably loaded with mites. I hate they even landed there.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Tigers
« Last post by The15thMember on December 01, 2022, 11:24:18 am »
I've never had a queen that was striped as much as a worker, but I've had dark queens, and they often have some striping on their abdomens. 
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DOWN UNDER BEEKEEPING / Re: Varroa detected in Australia
« Last post by Ben Framed on December 01, 2022, 11:23:36 am »
That is a sad story Max.


We have gone over the following basic information before. Just a refresher in case some of our newer members or guest might have missed it:

This small piece of basic information is taken from an article published by Texas A&M Agrilife

Topic: Varroa Mites

"They are spread within a colony when bees come into contact with one another. Mites are also spread between colonies and apiaries via robbing, drifting, swarming, and absconding. Varroa mites are unable to live for more than a few days without a host"
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: This is interesting
« Last post by Acebird on December 01, 2022, 08:02:25 am »
Brush them into a box with frames and see if they stay?
+1 check for queen.
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