Beemaster's International Beekeeping Forum

BEEKEEPING LEARNING CENTER => DISEASE & PEST CONTROL => Topic started by: Bobbee on July 07, 2020, 03:17:56 pm

Title: New hive mite check
Post by: Bobbee on July 07, 2020, 03:17:56 pm
When I first got my nucs the breeder guaranteed they were "Clean as a whistle" for varroa. Assuming (I hate using that word) he was right how often should I be inspecting the hive? Also being a newly started colony I am thinking a sugar roll rather than an alc kill test. My main concern at this point is with going into the hive too often and getting in the bees way.
Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: The15thMember on July 07, 2020, 03:26:56 pm
As a beginner I'd inspect hives weekly.  I think that is often enough that you'll catch most of what's happening in there, but not so much that you'll disturb them unnecessarily.  I also do sugar rolls instead of alcohol washes, since I don't like killing bees if I don't have to.  Sugar rolls are slightly less accurate, so what I do (on the recommendation of one of our other members here) is multiply the number of mites in the sugar roll by 1.3 to help compensate.  I do sugar rolls usually at the beginning of the season, early summer, late summer before treatments, after treatments, and before winter.       
Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: Robo on July 07, 2020, 05:46:47 pm
Sticky boards probably give a better indication than other methods and are also the least impacting on the hive.   Just shove them in the entrance and come back in 24hr and see the drop rate.   If it gives you peace of mind you could do it once a month or even more often if you want.
Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: amymcg on July 08, 2020, 09:25:50 pm
I also think that weekly is ok. Especially with your first hive.  I check for mites once a month using a sugar roll.


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Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: charentejohn on August 10, 2020, 10:44:46 am
I am doing the same (new to this as well) with 2x Warre hives with Dadant (I am in France) 5 frame adapters on.  So the bees start in the adapter and are currently working into the Warre boxes.  Arrived mid May and had bee treated with Apivar earlier in the year, my supplier didn't say no varroa just that they do it to ensure a low count for sale which was good.
Sure enough I put on sticky boards a month later and found 2 and 5/day which was as expected.  Through open tube floors on from the start.

A few days ago I did another sticky board test and found about 15 and 25/day in each active hives.  The higher one was massive when it arrived with a 5 frames full of stores and brood.
The acceptable number going into winter is supposedly 50/day but some say much less.  It will never be none but I will do it every couple of weeks as it was pointed out that trends are important as well as just numbers.  My boards go under the open floor and don't close it off (35-40c here) so are no bother to do, for me or them.

One question I have is what time of year do the bees start producing workers for the winter cluster, that is the end of rearing actual field workers.  I am interested as at that point most mites will be on bees with only a few in any brood cells. At that point any that drop will be unlikely to be replaced so it is of interest to me.   
Is it temperature or daylight dependent, I would guess start of October here as it can still be warm ?   Must be someting that tells them to do it.
Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: The15thMember on August 10, 2020, 01:15:00 pm
Is it temperature or daylight dependent, I would guess start of October here as it can still be warm ?   Must be someting that tells them to do it.
My guess would be that it's daylight length, since that is what triggers most of their yearly changes to my knowledge. 
Title: Re: New hive mite check
Post by: Ben Framed on August 12, 2020, 09:43:03 pm
Bobbee I recommend you view the following.  The first is by TheHoneyPump. Highly educational. the second is a topic which was posted here a couple years ago. Good stuff inside from folks such as TheHoneyPump, Van from Arkansas, Black Forest Beekeeper, The15Member and others. Well worth you time and VERY educational!

Mr HoneyPump put the following together for helping out some newbees in his local bee club. This is derived from discussion here on beemaster.  The 15thMember shared more information and pictures directly and helped him a bit proofreading it. 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NvP-olm7vwMxPVH-Oi1CNHH70Wq913ym/view?usp=sharing

The above can be found on the topic on Beemaster titled:
"Unsure What's Going On In This Hive". Reply number 84 by: TheHoneyPump