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Author Topic: Frozen Honey Frames  (Read 492 times)

Offline QueenBee422

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Frozen Honey Frames
« on: June 16, 2022, 01:41:16 pm »
Hello.  I have some honey frames that I froze from last summer.  No one to help extract so I have kept them frozen. 

How long does it take to thaw the frames?

Do I have to worry about freezer burn?  This freezer is one I have dedicated to honey frames only.

Offline BeeMaster2

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2022, 01:51:44 pm »
Just  bring them in the house and put a fan on them to keep the moisture from building up on the wax. If they are in a super, turn them sideways so that the air goes through. By morning they should bee ready.
Jim Altmiller

Offline paus

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2022, 02:03:53 pm »
Jim's advice is right on.  I have a freezer dedicated to bee stuff.  It does not work, as my wife has it full of food and there is no room for five frames of honey I pulled about three hours ago.  But this a first world bee keepers problem.  I have never experienced any freezer burn problems.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2022, 02:07:20 pm »
No worries about freezer burn with honey, it keeps forever both in and out of the freezer.  When I go to extract frozen honey, I just leave the frames in my house either in a super or in a bin for a couple of days so they have time to fully thaw and any moisture that formed during the warming process will evaporate away.

I actually love to eat frozen honey.  It's like cold honey taffy.  Whenever I have frozen frames I always break off a chunk to eat before they are thawed.  The broken section can make a little bit of a mess as the honey starts to warm, but the whole process is messy anyway, so I don't really care.  :grin:

Jim's advice is right on.  I have a freezer dedicated to bee stuff.  It does not work, as my wife has it full of food and there is no room for five frames of honey I pulled about three hours ago.  But this a first world bee keepers problem.  I have never experienced any freezer burn problems.
:cheesy: I've been there paus!  I clear myself some room in the freezer and if I don't get the frames right in there, there's food or goats milk in the spot before I know it! 
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline QueenBee422

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2022, 02:45:37 pm »
Just  bring them in the house and put a fan on them to keep the moisture from building up on the wax. If they are in a super, turn them sideways so that the air goes through. By morning they should bee ready.
Jim Altmiller

I have them in a capping tank with the lid cracked - I was worried about flies.  Do you think the fan will keep the flys at bay?

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2022, 03:01:48 pm »
I have them in a capping tank with the lid cracked - I was worried about flies.  Do you think the fan will keep the flys at bay?
Is the capping tank in an enclosed area, like in a building, where insects can't get to the frames?  As long as it is, flies shouldn't be a problem.  A rogue house fly or two can't really do any damage to capped honey frames.  Bees are far more of a problem for finding honey than flies, and a fan sure wouldn't keep them away. 
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline QueenBee422

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2022, 03:15:45 pm »
I have them in a capping tank with the lid cracked - I was worried about flies.  Do you think the fan will keep the flys at bay?
Is the capping tank in an enclosed area, like in a building, where insects can't get to the frames?  As long as it is, flies shouldn't be a problem.  A rogue house fly or two can't really do any damage to capped honey frames.  Bees are far more of a problem for finding honey than flies, and a fan sure wouldn't keep them away.

Yes.  In my kitchen but we do a have a few flies in my house.  I am trying to get them taken care of before the actual extracting.

Online Ben Framed

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2022, 03:25:43 pm »
QueenBee422 Just for good insurance, some of us freeze our honey frames before extracting for the concern of (possible) SHB eggs. I instead place my honey in the freezer (after) extraction for the same reason. This may not be necessary, but in my part of the South, Small Hive Beetles are a concern.

Phillip
If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14 KJV

Offline paus

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Re: Frozen Honey Frames
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2022, 07:42:29 pm »
Honey does not granulate if kept in the freezer.  Well, there was some deer hamburger and sausage left in my honey freezer after my sweet wife moved "her" stuff to another freezer.  I had a deep with frames in the freezer that had a start of web worms from an absconded colony.    FYI  Those that use DSBB with oil,  keep the oil pan serviced.  Three days ago I serviced some hives and the oil had dried, and had bunches of SHB in them.  Today I went through some hives that I had replaced the oil in the pan, three days ago, not one small hive beetle except in oil pan.  These were double deep 10 frame hives  full of bees, brood, honey and pollen.