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Author Topic: maintenance  (Read 2053 times)

Offline thylton48

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maintenance
« on: January 01, 2015, 09:12:57 pm »
Hi I am thinking of starting beekeping as a hobby; don't have a lot of spare time so was wondering which hive type requires the least time for maintenance and inspection

Offline Robo

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2015, 10:53:03 pm »
Warre Hive,  you can set it and forget it if you want.  I have one that hasn't been opened in 3 years.

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Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2015, 06:17:55 am »
Thylton,
You can also do the same with a Langstroth hive. I have one hive in an out apiary that the only thing that I have done to it in the last 2 years is remove honey and this year it produced as much honey as ten other hives. For some reason the other hives were not capping the honey. Lots of it but not capped, spring and fall. I think they figured out that they get to keep it if it is not capped.  :-D
Jim
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Offline capt44

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2015, 08:01:15 pm »
The Langstroth hive is the way I'd go for it is easier to get parts and accessories for.
Richard Vardaman (capt44)

Offline thylton48

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2015, 03:22:20 pm »
Thanks guys

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2015, 11:24:18 am »
The type of hive doesn't change management.  Management changes management.  You can manage a Langstroth like a Warre'.  You can manage a Warre' like  Langstroth if you don't nail the bars in.  For maximum yield and minimum swarms you will need to manage them...
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Offline dirt road

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2015, 03:02:58 pm »
A hobby that you can't or don't want to invest time in???? I wonder why you would pick beekeeping? These folks who have hives that they are not doing much or anything to, have experience with bees. They can tell you more about what is going on with their hive from the outside, than you as a beginner will be able to grasp after a full inspection. Nothing against beginners, we all are at some point. I would suggest that you might see if you can locate a local "keeper" who would be willing to place a hive or two on your place, and let you look over their shoulder when you have a little time, and they are doing some maintenance. Even if you paid them $50.00 to leave one or two in place for the year, it would be a lot cheaper than buying the bees and equipment only to have them die out without knowing why. Then again, you might get lucky and have the one in a hundred that would survive indefinitely on their own.

Offline capt44

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2015, 05:03:55 pm »
This is my way of thinking.
Honey Bees have been here way before mankind was thought of, then along came man and he tried to domesticate the Honey Bees. Now the Honey Bees are in Danger mostly from Man Kind.
I agree the type of hive doesn't matter, it was just in this part of the country a langstroth 10 frame equipment is easier to get parts for.
A person has to manage his honey bees for maximum production whether honey, Bees or Queens.
Richard Vardaman (capt44)

Offline don2

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2015, 06:31:14 pm »
After reading a good book on beekeeping and numerous threads on this forum, if you still don't think you would have enough time to take care of up to 6 colonies I would find another hobby. d2
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 10:24:51 pm by don2 »

Offline hjon71

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Re: maintenance
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2015, 11:31:06 pm »
Hi I am thinking of starting beekeping as a hobby; don't have a lot of spare time so was wondering which hive type requires the least time for maintenance and inspection

Nothing wrong with this. This is how I do it for the most part. Let the bees be bees. I do try to manage for swarms and to get some honey, but otherwise leave them alone. Good luck on your adventure.  I'd stick with Langstroth hives.
Quite difficult matters can be explained even to a slow-witted man, if only he has not already adopted a wrong opinion about them; but the simplest things cannot be made clear even to a very intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he already knows, and knows indubitably, the truth of the matter under consideration. -Leo Tolstoy