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Author Topic: Baccharis Halimifolia  (Read 430 times)

Offline Bob Wilson

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Baccharis Halimifolia
« on: November 07, 2021, 11:57:22 pm »
Goldenrod faded out a week or two ago, and yet the bees were still being busy. In fact, I never found any bees in the various places I checked with goldenrod. But this brushy shub has been had white drifts of dandilion seedheads, and it has been scattered all over the roadside and field edges for the last month. This white seed head plant (see photo) is the female, and the male has cream colored flowers. It's supposed to provide the bees with a nice, sweet nectar. its called Saltbrush, Groundsel, etc.
Anyone heard of it?

Offline Brian MCquilkin

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2021, 02:28:04 pm »
Bee crazy weather here in Wisconsin, goldenrod finished but been on a warm-up over the last few days. Some lavender thinks it's spring and has flowered for the 3rd time this year, dandelions are blooming and bees bringing in pollen. I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
Despite my efforts the bees are doing great

Online The15thMember

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2021, 05:52:19 pm »
Goldenrod faded out a week or two ago, and yet the bees were still being busy. In fact, I never found any bees in the various places I checked with goldenrod. But this brushy shub has been had white drifts of dandilion seedheads, and it has been scattered all over the roadside and field edges for the last month. This white seed head plant (see photo) is the female, and the male has cream colored flowers. It's supposed to provide the bees with a nice, sweet nectar. its called Saltbrush, Groundsel, etc.
Anyone heard of it?
I've never seen that plant before, but anything that blooms late is always great. 

Bee crazy weather here in Wisconsin, goldenrod finished but been on a warm-up over the last few days. Some lavender thinks it's spring and has flowered for the 3rd time this year, dandelions are blooming and bees bringing in pollen. I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
We've had a similar situation down here, where things that normally bloom in the spring seem to be trying to bloom again.  It's kind of weird.  Our weather is supposed to be pretty warm this week, but it has been pretty chilly recently. 
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline Acebird

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2021, 08:43:59 am »
I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
A bit of a curse to the southern states.  I really think bees are more serious about collecting nectar in the north.  The long dearth of winter weeds out the weaker hives.
Brian Cardinal
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Offline Oldbeavo

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2021, 05:14:07 pm »
I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
A bit of a curse to the southern states.  I really think bees are more serious about collecting nectar in the north.  The long dearth of winter weeds out the weaker hives.
Could some one explain about bees using too many resources and how collecting pollen is a curse in the southern states.
It is not a situation that occurs down under or I am not aware of it.

Offline Brian MCquilkin

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2021, 07:18:22 pm »
I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
Could some one explain about bees using too many resources and how collecting pollen is a curse in the southern states.
It is not a situation that occurs down under or I am not aware of it.
The resources are the amount of honey and pollen in the hive that is needed to get them through the 5 months till spring.
Normally the queen has slowed down by now and the colonies should be bloodless. Because the queens have not shut down we have more bees which consume more of the resources in the colony. My goal weight going into winter is between 150-160 pounds. The bees eating more than what they are bringing in creates a problem, not enough resources to get through winter. I Will be watching them closely to make sure they don't starve.
Despite my efforts the bees are doing great

Online Ben Framed

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2021, 09:25:06 pm »
I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
A bit of a curse to the southern states.  I really think bees are more serious about collecting nectar in the north.  The long dearth of winter weeds out the weaker hives.
Could some one explain about bees using too many resources and how collecting pollen is a curse in the southern states.
It is not a situation that occurs down under or I am not aware of it.

I can only speak for my area of the 'Mid-South' Oldbeavo, along with my own personal experience. Winter bees, when not dormant spend or use resources flying in, out, and about on warmer days, while not being able to replenish the resources used outside of the hive in these endeavors during time of limbo. By nature during this time, nothing is blooming, (no resources coming in yet resources are spent trying), during the warmer winter days. (I am speaking in terms of my area).

Ace has lived in both locations, much further North and much further South than I. He has first hand experience and knowledge about this subject of these locations, unlike me.

Gathering pollen is not a curse to me in my location, 'Zone 7', bees gathering an abundant amount of pollen I welcome. It seems bees use most or all of it during the winter months (and 'early' spring), here with nothing wasted. It is necessary in the winter months in my location as part of their diet and nutrition.

There has been topics posted and discussed here at beemaster which covers this subject since I have been a member here. I do believe that food in one form or another such as nectar sub or (maybe in the form of mountain camp for another), should be made 'readily available' (especially in late winter and early spring), in case not enough honey is left for the bees winter feed, (again in my area), which amounts may vary from year to year, dependant on the weather conditions here at my location. I have reached the opinion it is best to be safe than sorry in regards of feeding both feed and 'pollen sub if necessary' during this time.





 
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 09:52:12 pm by Ben Framed »
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Offline Brian MCquilkin

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2021, 11:06:04 am »
I want it to freeze as the bees are using too many resources this late in the season.
A bit of a curse to the southern states.  I really think bees are more serious about collecting nectar in the north.  The long dearth of winter weeds out the weaker hives.
Could some one explain about bees using too many resources and how collecting pollen is a curse in the southern states.
It is not a situation that occurs down under or I am not aware of it.

There has been topics posted and discussed here at beemaster which covers this subject since I have been a member here. I do believe that food in one form or another such as nectar sub or (maybe in the form of mountain camp for another), should be made 'readily available' (especially in late winter and early spring), in case not enough honey is left for the bees winter feed, (again in my area), which amounts may vary from year to year, dependant on the weather conditions here at my location. I have reached the opinion it is best to be safe than sorry in regards of feeding both feed and 'pollen sub if necessary' during this time.
Just finished putting on mountain camp on 85 colonies, will be checking them and add more as needed over the winter months.
Despite my efforts the bees are doing great

Online Ben Framed

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Re: Baccharis Halimifolia
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2021, 10:52:12 pm »
Quote
Just finished putting on mountain camp on 85 colonies, will be checking them and add more as needed over the winter months.

Mr MCquilkin your success is inspiring. I remember when you was discussing keeping bees in the North, telling us you had moved to Wisconsin from Texas. You have done VERY well! Congratulations on your success!!

Phillip





« Last Edit: November 12, 2021, 11:16:38 am by Ben Framed »
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.