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Author Topic: New England forest questions  (Read 1265 times)

Offline Dallasbeek

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New England forest questions
« on: June 28, 2017, 08:10:26 pm »
I was in New England last week and saw a lot of dead hemlocks, mostly immature ones.  Is there some kind of disease atacking them, like the dead conifers I've seen in the Northwest that have some kind of disease spread by beetles?

Also, some kind of vine seems to be weighing down trees, utility poles, etc., like kudzu does in the south.  Is that a recent invasive species of vine?
"Liberty lives in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no laws, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand, 1944

Offline bwallace23350

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2017, 10:17:24 am »
How bad was it? Were all hte immature ones dead or even a majority of them?

Offline Dallasbeek

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2017, 01:22:50 pm »
I just noticed a lot of dead trees, sometimes stands of 3 or 4.  They were all or almost all young trees, maybe 20 feet tall or less.  I didn't notice any mature hemlocks that were dead.  These were all near the interstate and we wondered about pollution, but doubt that, since they were out in the country and New England doesn't have that much air pollution. All the other vegetation was thick, green and lush.
"Liberty lives in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no laws, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand, 1944

Offline bwallace23350

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2017, 02:14:51 pm »
I hate to hear that. I do hear that there is some good work on bringing back the elms though.

Offline Jim 134

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2017, 07:35:50 pm »
I was in New England last week and saw a lot of dead hemlocks, mostly immature ones.  Is there some kind of disease atacking them, like the dead conifers I've seen in the Northwest that have some kind of disease spread by beetles?

Also, some kind of vine seems to be weighing down trees, utility poles, etc., like kudzu does in the south.  Is that a recent invasive species of vine?

   I believe the first thing you're seeing is the results of acid rain. From coal or oil fired electric plants.. New England has gotten a lot of pollution from places like Cleveland  Ohio and many other places. Around the Eastern side  of Great Lake.  When it was smelting a lot of Steel .. one of the biggest  coal /oil-fired generator plants  in North America is along the shores of Lake Ontario in Canada.
    The next thing I think you're seeing is bittersweet.  One of the most invasive plants plants in the Northeast. Bittersweet under the right conditions will grow up to 18 inches a day.

This is the scientific name for the Bittersweet in New England.
Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) - Also known as Asiatic bittersweet,

                 BEE HAPPY Jim 134  :smile:
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Offline Dallasbeek

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2017, 09:50:00 pm »
I was hoping you'd check in on this, Jim.  I saw a few dead hemlocks as far south as New London and several between Hartford and Brattleboro.  (We were staying in the Latchis Hotel while in town for my brother-in-law's memorial service.)

That's quite a vine you've got up there.  Since kudzu doesn't grow that far north, I guess somebody brought bittersweet to give you folks a problem.  So far, we're lucky in north Texas to not have something like those vines.  But zebra mussels are moving into our lakes and some of our Asian friends bring in and release live fish that find our waters very inviting.

"Liberty lives in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no laws, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand, 1944

Offline salvo

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2017, 10:34:10 pm »
Hi Folks,

I live in Middleborough, Massachusetts. Incredibly sad the extent of tree death.

One issue, for Hemlock, is the "Wooley Adelgid". A small, cottony, soft, sucker of life. I've lost trees. Please click the link:
http://www.caryinstitute.org/science-program/research-projects/effects-invasive-hemlock-woolly-adelgid-northeastern-forests

A more problematic issue is:
"You may have noticed that many the spruce trees in our area of southern New England have been dying lately.  The cause is a fungal disease called Rhizosphaera needle cast.  Like most needle cast diseases, Rhizosphaera infects the newly emerging needles of its host trees from older needles infected the previous year.  The newly infected needles will grow normally through the current growing season and will not show signs of infection until the fungus matures to its spore producing stage, usually late winter or early spring of the following year, but sometimes as early as late fall of the current growing season.  As you can see in the photograph below, the disease typically affects the lower portions of the tree first and progresses farther up the tree in subsequent years until the tree dies".

Whole "forests" have been destroyed.

Sal

Salvo

Offline Jim 134

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2017, 10:41:59 pm »
      I did have lunch at the Brattleboro food Co-op t today. Hotel where you're staying is located directly across the Footbridge hahaha

     I will be going to Houston Texas in about five weeks...Going to see my son and his family...

 If you're in Brattleboro for the weekend here's a place you'd like to go

www.esteyorganmuseum.org


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estey_Organ

                 BEE HAPPY Jim 134  :smile:

"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/

Offline bwallace23350

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2017, 09:11:39 am »
Hi Folks,

I live in Middleborough, Massachusetts. Incredibly sad the extent of tree death.

One issue, for Hemlock, is the "Wooley Adelgid". A small, cottony, soft, sucker of life. I've lost trees. Please click the link:
http://www.caryinstitute.org/science-program/research-projects/effects-invasive-hemlock-woolly-adelgid-northeastern-forests

A more problematic issue is:
"You may have noticed that many the spruce trees in our area of southern New England have been dying lately.  The cause is a fungal disease called Rhizosphaera needle cast.  Like most needle cast diseases, Rhizosphaera infects the newly emerging needles of its host trees from older needles infected the previous year.  The newly infected needles will grow normally through the current growing season and will not show signs of infection until the fungus matures to its spore producing stage, usually late winter or early spring of the following year, but sometimes as early as late fall of the current growing season.  As you can see in the photograph below, the disease typically affects the lower portions of the tree first and progresses farther up the tree in subsequent years until the tree dies".

Whole "forests" have been destroyed.

Sal

Is there any hope to stop the spread of these diseases or are these trees going the way of the American Chestnut?

Offline Acebird

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2017, 09:38:24 am »
Well NY is not New England but due to global warming we have virginia creaper and wild grape covering our trees now.  Many plants that would die back in the winter do not anymore.
Brian Cardinal
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Offline bwallace23350

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2017, 09:49:02 am »
Well NY is not New England but due to global warming we have virginia creaper and wild grape covering our trees now.  Many plants that would die back in the winter do not anymore.

Now you know that global warming is not real.

Offline Acebird

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2017, 10:05:18 am »
Not real in the make believe minds.
Brian Cardinal
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Offline bwallace23350

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2017, 11:20:08 am »
Not real in the make believe minds.

Its a conspiracy of all the scientists. The vast majority are in on it

Offline Hops Brewster

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2017, 12:32:26 pm »
Well NY is not New England but due to global warming we have virginia creaper and wild grape covering our trees now.  Many plants that would die back in the winter do not anymore.
"Due to global warming".  You're behind the times, Ace.  It isn't "global warming" these days.  It's "Climate Change", because they can't tell you if it's warming or cooling next year.
BTW, Virginia creeper is native to eastern and central North America, from southeastern Canada and the eastern United States west to Manitoba and Utah, and south to eastern Mexico and Guatemala.  That area includes New York. 
Wild grapes have also been known to grow as far north as Newfoundland.  The Vikings found grapes in their explorations of The Maritimes and New England.  The wild grape known as Frost Grapes is native north through Massachusetts, and  when it was warmer a few hundred years ago, they grew up into Maine.

One thing climate is certain to do is change, and there is nothing you or AlGore can do to stop it.
Winter is coming.

I can't say I hate the government, but I am proudly distrustful of them.

Offline Dallasbeek

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2017, 02:56:20 pm »
     
 If you're in Brattleboro for the weekend here's a place you'd like to go

www.esteyorganmuseum.org


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estey_Organ

                 BEE HAPPY Jim 134  :smile:

Thanks, Jim.  I didn't know the museum was open.  My wife's aunt worked for the Esty family as a pastry cook in their home.
"Liberty lives in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no laws, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand, 1944

Offline Acebird

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2017, 03:32:14 pm »
One thing climate is certain to do is change, and there is nothing you or AlGore can do to stop it.

Sorry, I believe the scientist who make it their life of these studies.
Fist it was Climate change, then it was global warming now according to you it is Climate change again.  It doesn't matter what you call it the fact is that the polar ice caps are melting faster then they should.  Climate should not change at a rapid pace.  Weather changes but not climate.  No one should experience a climate change in a human life span.
Brian Cardinal
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Offline Psparr

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2017, 03:51:16 pm »
I like change.

Offline Jim 134

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2017, 12:26:38 am »


Is there any hope to stop the spread of these diseases or are these trees going the way of the American Chestnut?


        https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/an-army-of-beetles-could-save-dying-hemlock-forests/



              BEE HAPPY Jim. 134  :smile:
"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2017, 08:58:05 am »
One thing climate is certain to do is change, and there is nothing you or AlGore can do to stop it.

Sorry, I believe the scientist who make it their life of these studies.
Fist it was Climate change, then it was global warming now according to you it is Climate change again.  It doesn't matter what you call it the fact is that the polar ice caps are melting faster then they should.  Climate should not change at a rapid pace.  Weather changes but not climate.  No one should experience a climate change in a human life span.
Ace,
If the world was warming, Miami and most coastal cities would be under water a decade ago.
According to the Inuit Chiefs, the earth has tilted which would totally account for the northern hemisphere warming up.
Does anyone on here know how to navigate by the stars?
A simple reading of the suns position compared to an old set of charts should be able to confirm this.
If you have a sextant and know how to use it, please check this out.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Acebird

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Re: New England forest questions
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2017, 09:40:52 am »
If your theory was correct there would be an increasing amount of ice build up in the south pole that makes up for the loss in the north.  You have to fix your theory.
Brian Cardinal
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