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Author Topic: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding  (Read 8266 times)

Offline buzzbee

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Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« on: February 02, 2014, 11:18:13 am »
« Last Edit: March 31, 2018, 10:12:21 pm by buzzbee »

Offline Bruce

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 09:59:05 pm »
Though I generally don't feed my bees mid to late winter is an exception. For new beekeepers a misconception is that bees are very fragile. If you "quickly" (the few seconds needed - don't pull frames) and intelligently (not in a snow storm and not often) open your hive in winter they will not die and you can check on their food supply. You can cook fondant and add an acid to invert the sugar (bees do that in their nectar tommy) but it's not necessary if you are lazy like me and Michael Bush ( http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm). Here are a few tips on feeding bees in winter http://strathconabeekeepers.blogspot.ca/2014/01/feeding-bees-in-winter.html

Offline iddee

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 10:13:34 pm »
You don't need to open them at all if you just heft them regularly. You can tell by the weight if they need feed. Then you can drop a patty or sugar brick on in much less time when you do have to open one.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Offline little john

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2017, 06:10:12 am »
I agree - there's really no need to ever open a hive in winter in order to check stores or give supplementary/ emergency feed.  For myself, there's little point in hefting as only a few of my hives are of the same construction and thus weight - otherwise I would.  Instead, I use insulated inverted jars over purpose-made holes in the crown board (inner cover), which - from January/February onwards contain either fondant or damp-set sugar.  I can then very quickly monitor these jars on (typically) a weekly basis, without opening the hive itself, and replenish them only if necessary.  Which, in practice, is very seldom.

I haven't lost a single colony from starvation since I adopted this measure some years ago.
http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/beek02.htm

LJ
A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping - http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2017, 06:53:06 am »
Good article. Thanks for sharing.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline capt44

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2018, 12:22:20 pm »
Here in Central Arkansas I keep a dry pollen substitute out all winter (BEE PRO)
I also keep 2-1 sugar syrup in 5 gallon community feeders.
If their food stores get low I use the Mountain Camp Method also.
We have warm days and cool to cold days.
The bees fly and use energy thus eat a lot of food in the hive.
I make sure the hive has plenty of ventilation which is a key to winter survival here because of the high humidities.
Richard Vardaman (capt44)

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2018, 10:44:47 pm »
Here in Central Arkansas I keep a dry pollen substitute out all winter (BEE PRO)
I also keep 2-1 sugar syrup in 5 gallon community feeders.
If their food stores get low I use the Mountain Camp Method also.
We have warm days and cool to cold days.
The bees fly and use energy thus eat a lot of food in the hive.
I make sure the hive has plenty of ventilation which is a key to winter survival here because of the high humidities.

capt44  Keep in mind that I am learning,  the Mountain Camp Method is something that I know nothing about. Will you tell me about it please sir?

Offline cao

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2018, 01:33:19 am »
The mountain camp method is basically putting a sheet of newspaper(wax paper) on top of the frames.  Piling some dry sugar on it and spritzing it with water to clump it up (so the bees don't carry the sugar out as trash).  It is a quick way to put sugar on a hive instead of fondant or sugar bricks. 

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Mid to Late Winter emergency feeding
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2018, 11:28:49 am »
The mountain camp method is basically putting a sheet of newspaper(wax paper) on top of the frames.  Piling some dry sugar on it and spritzing it with water to clump it up (so the bees don't carry the sugar out as trash).  It is a quick way to put sugar on a hive instead of fondant or sugar bricks.

Thanks cao, I knew of the method that you described but didn't know it as the mountian camp method, or that was the name of the method..  many thanks , Phillip Hall