Beemaster's International Beekeeping Forum

BEEKEEPING LEARNING CENTER => HONEYBEE REMOVAL => Topic started by: Understudy on March 12, 2008, 05:55:12 pm

Title: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 12, 2008, 05:55:12 pm
This is the list of tools kathyp and I have used for our cutouts.
1. Sawzall corded , the cordless one will not last long enough.
2. Extension cord for the above item.
3. Bee Vac with Shop Vac.
4. Smoker and fuel for it.
5. Serrated knives, my favorite is a small pumpkin carver because it fits into
small spaces.
6. Veil (beesuit if they are mean)
7. Camera, you want pictures
8. Bee brush
9. Screwdriver for prying stucco. Prybar will work also.
10. Big tupperware/rubbermade container.
11. A bucket with water or a hose.
12. Marble / tile cutting blades for sawzall. I recommend you have at least
four. you will burn through them. For stucco walls and soffits.
13. Drill with large masonry bit.
14. Flashlight to look into dark corners.
15. Queen cage just in case. Or empty jar with holes in the lid (clean the jar)
16. Safety googles and breathing mask
17. Paint scraper for removing comb remnants.
18. Tarp, having two is even better.
19. Baby Wipes (you will be a sticky mess)
20. Duct tape
21. Window screening.
22. Plumbing straps and screws or Hive staples.
23. Hammer
24. Staple gun.
25. Sprayer
26. 8 foot ladder
27. Keyhole saw, razor knife, linoleum knife

1. The sawzall will cut into walls, ceiling and soffits. Have the right type of blade. I love cordless sawzalls but cutting stucco drains them quickly. So I recommended corded.
2. Extension cord for sawzall, drills, and shopvacs.
3. Bee Vac to get those bees in the tight corners.
4. Smoker because getting stung sucks. Running out of smoker fuel sucks also.
5. Serrated knives so you can cut the comb out. Small knives fit into tight places better.
6. Veil and beesuit for when the bees don't like you. At the minimum a veil and long sleeve shirt. After you have done it for a while you can do it in your shorts if you want. But go in protected first.
7. Camera, No cut out happens unless you have proof. ;)
8. Bee Brush to brush bees into box or out of the way.
9. Screwdriver, prybar Because when you have cut that opening you actually need to remove the piece.
10. Big container for extra comb.
11. A bucket with water or hose. For clean up of honey on walls and your self. The hose is better because if the bees get way to nasty you can use it to make it rain and calm down the situation.
12. Sawzall tile blades because Stucco is concrete and hard to cut. Even these blades  burn out quickly.
13. Drill (may be cordless) with a large masonary bit or whatever bit is appropriate for the material you are drilling. A hole saw blade can be used on drywall. This gives you the ability to see where the comb is. Also the drill bit should be large enough to allow the sawzall blade in so you can cut the material.
14. Because being in the dark with bees is a bad thing.
15. If you do spot the queen you do want to save her. A queen cage or jar with holes in the lid will work great. Make sure the jar is clean.
16. Googles and mask because going to the hospital because you got concrete in your eye is far more embarrassing than going in with a few hundred stings.
17. A paint scraper removes those small comb remnants. You don't want to leave comb in the wall.
18. Tarp because this is going to be messy.
19. Baby Wipes because your hands are going to stick to everything.
20. Duct tape to seal up small openings in the hive or secure hive parts. It's duct tape  you always need it.
21. Window screening because it keeps the bees in the box. I use this with duck boxes  and cover the entrance. And drive with the bees in the truck.
22. Hive staples , plumbing straps because if you have a cut out that fills three boxes and you stop suddenly you want the hive bodies to not slide off each other.
23. Hammer for those small but needed adjustments.
24. Staple gun for screening and anything else you can think of.
25. Sprayer small one and exterminator types filled with cold sugar water. To catch swarms. Spray the swarm down and put bees in box. Warning bees don't like showers and may express their displeasure.
26. 8 foot ladder because not all of us are basketball stars
27. Something to cut drywall with.

Thanks to kathyp for her contributions. Suggestions welcome.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Angi_H on March 13, 2008, 12:46:01 am
Laddar can not forget laddar or other type of device to stand on for those high places. Rented or not.

Angi
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 13, 2008, 12:51:03 am
Done Angi. Thank You

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Jerrymac on March 13, 2008, 01:30:59 am
I used a side grinder with masonry wheel on stucco. On that church I did the prying and wire cutting and all the popping didn't help the disposition of the bees. I use a circular saw for the majority of wood cutting. I would think the sawzall, going in and out, would equate to hammering, especially if you hit something with the end, and we all know how bees hate banging and popping and knocking. Then a hand saw if the skill saw doesn't quite reach where it needs to go. Sheet rock is simply cut with a knife that looks a lot like this (http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:1yBgL5YMpXyFfM:http://www.tias.com/stores/mamas/thumbs/2538a.jpg) I know, it's call a linoleum knife. But I happen to have it on hand. 
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 13, 2008, 08:57:46 am
I added keyhole saw, razor knife, linoleum knife. I understand the side grinder with the masonry wheel but with me it seems that upsets them more than the sawzall with a tile blade. I can also use the sawzall for wood cutting so it is one less thing I have to carry around. However there is nothing wrong with a circular saw.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on March 13, 2008, 11:42:13 am
the sawzall is so fast, i'd think you'd be done before they'd get to upset.

my big contribution was the baby wipes.  :-)  i know for a fact that you can go 17 days without a shower if you have baby wipes  :-P

thanks for posting this.  it is so helpful!
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 13, 2008, 11:48:20 am
my big contribution was the baby wipes.  :-)  i know for a fact that you can go 17 days without a shower if you have baby wipes  :-P


Please file under way to much information.  :)

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Robo on March 14, 2008, 10:06:51 am
Great list guys. :-D

I have attached the checklist I use if anyone is interested.   If I don't go thru the checklist,  I'm guaranteed to forget something :-\
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Frantz on March 14, 2008, 10:33:48 am
Excellent list guys, Thank you so much for the list. I hope to get a few this year. After losing 10 of 12 this winter. I finally found a guy here in SLC that is doing them and advertising. He charges a base of $400 to do them unless its just a swarm capture. I have sent him an email and told him if he ever needs a free hand to just let me know. Nothing yet??
Frantz
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 14, 2008, 12:12:42 pm
Great list guys. :-D

I have attached the checklist I use if anyone is interested.   If I don't go thru the checklist,  I'm guaranteed to forget something :-\

Thanks for the form. I like that one a lot.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: dpence on March 24, 2008, 02:33:40 pm
I have a portable generator, for those places with no electricity. 

David
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 24, 2008, 06:13:24 pm
I have a portable generator, for those places with no electricity. 

David
I think a portable generator is a good idea if you are doing this professionally. For the hobbiest, I would say use either cordless tools or rent a generator. Because I feel that at least in Florida. It is rare that you are in a situation where you need electricity. Also I have a 4000 watt inverter in my van and a battery bank. I use for work and that is also an alternative idea. However I feel these are more along the lines of professional tools.

You circumstances may be different so a generator may be a very practical idea.

If you are doing this professionally a bucket truck would also be a good idea. :)

If you rent a generator more than 4 times a year. Buy a good generator. I am not sure what is like up north but here in Florida almost everyone has one because of the hurricanes. I assume snow white outs would probably mean most people in the north have one also.

Sincerely,
Brendhan



Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on March 24, 2008, 06:30:27 pm
dust pan.  i used one this time and it worked well.  since i don't have a bee vac yet, i swept the bees into the dust pan and dumped them into the hive. 
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 24, 2008, 07:34:33 pm
dust pan.  i used one this time and it worked well.  since i don't have a bee vac yet, i swept the bees into the dust pan and dumped them into the hive. 

An excellent idea. They didn't just fly out and attack the sweeper?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on March 24, 2008, 08:20:45 pm
 i just swept up the clumps and swept down the post that they were on.  they kind of pealed off and dropped in the pan.  they weren't happy, but i didn't get any stings on the first hive.  they all came from the 2nd hive and not while i was sweeping them :-)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on March 24, 2008, 11:48:14 pm
Along with most of the things ya'll mentioned, one thing you didn't, which comes in real handy at times. A queen catcher.


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on March 24, 2008, 11:58:35 pm
I like the hair clip style one.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on March 25, 2008, 12:05:24 am
I like the hair clip style one.

Sincerely,
Brendhan



Is there any other type?


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: dpence on March 25, 2008, 01:58:41 am
I have a portable generator, for those places with no electricity. 

David

If you are doing this professionally a bucket truck would also be a good idea. :)

I assume snow white outs would probably mean most people in the north have one also.


I am sorta a tool fanatic, but yes we do have power outages here, ususally do to electrical storms.  Just a hobbiest, but a bucket truck would be nice to take out this old maple tree in my yard I am going to have to pay to have removed...LOL.  One other tool we found handy is a sheetrock mudding knife thats about 6 inches wide.  Worked well to cut the comb off with.     
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: genesbees on March 25, 2008, 02:09:42 pm
I like to keep a couple of epi pens handy.  Also plenty of rubber bands for strapping comb into frames.  I take a propane torch (one with a push button igniter) for lighting the smoker and heating knives to cut the comb.  I especially like my old carving knife that has about 1" bent over 90 degrees on the tip.  Don't forget plenty of tie down straps, I use the ratchet type.  I carry a 5' folding plastic table (from Sam's) to set near my work area to put stuff on.  Folding chairs are also nice to have when you need a break in the shade.  Being in Texas, I also bring along plenty of water and/or Gatoraid.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: KONASDAD on May 05, 2008, 04:02:19 pm
In keeping w/ KP's suggestion of a dust pan, i now use a fireplace dust-pan. It has a long handle, is sturdy, but narrrower for tight spaces and deep sides to keep bes in pan. I use a painbrush for bee brush so its not wider than pan.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: NWIN Beekeeper on June 14, 2008, 01:14:49 am
I see two items not on anyone's lists that I would add.

Branch Swarm Removals
First off A plain white sheet.
All too many times a little bit of the cluster falls off into the grass and it takes too long to wait for them to walk into the hive.
With a sheet you can pick them up and shake them into the swarm hive.

Cut Outs
A long (approx 24" long and 2-4" wide) knife or blade.
This is handy for cutting combs loose in long voids like wall spaces.
A sturdy piece of sheet metal (air duct) works very well with one edge sharpened.

PS. Bee brushes are over-rated. I have reverted to goose feathers to brush bees from combs. Fewer bees get tangled, release far less alarm pheromones, and thus excite the bees far less. Older methods can be better methods.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on June 14, 2008, 02:48:39 am
I see two items not on anyone's lists that I would add.

Branch Swarm Removals
First off A plain white sheet.
All too many times a little bit of the cluster falls off into the grass and it takes too long to wait for them to walk into the hive.
With a sheet you can pick them up and shake them into the swarm hive.

Cut Outs
A long (approx 24" long and 2-4" wide) knife or blade.
This is handy for cutting combs loose in long voids like wall spaces.
A sturdy piece of sheet metal (air duct) works very well with one edge sharpened.

PS. Bee brushes are over-rated. I have reverted to goose feathers to brush bees from combs. Fewer bees get tangled, release far less alarm pheromones, and thus excite the bees far less. Older methods can be better methods.

I have three scrapers in my tool box. Two are the same that long handles can screw into, one handle's about 2' long another about 3 and a 1/2' the other is about 5'.

Sheets do work well, especially under bushes and tall grass.

I don't care for bee brushes, never did, you're right they p.o. the bees,


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: sjbees on February 06, 2009, 03:08:10 am
Kinda late for a comment on tools for a removal, but my sawzall only gets used on soffets or when both sides of what is being cut are visible.

Nests can be in wall partitions that have water pipes and electrical romex running through them. In a couple of cases the bees had used the holes the romex ran through to expand their nest into the next partition. Cutting through either kind of copper raises not only the prospect of damage liability, it could involve personal injury as well.

Instead of a sawzall I use:

 - Angle grinder w/diamond blade on stucco
 - Spiral cutter w/ceramic tile bit on sheetrock (the ceramic bits last way longer than the HSS)
 - Circular saw for the major cuts on timber plus the spiral cutter to get tight into a corner.

Ryobi makes all three in the 18V One Plus line, and the new lithium ion batteries do a remarkable job. The batteries are good enough that the electrical tools are back under the workbench.

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on February 06, 2009, 08:26:57 am
Kinda late for a comment on tools for a removal, but my sawzall only gets used on soffets or when both sides of what is being cut are visible.

Nests can be in wall partitions that have water pipes and electrical romex running through them. In a couple of cases the bees had used the holes the romex ran through to expand their nest into the next partition. Cutting through either kind of copper raises not only the prospect of damage liability, it could involve personal injury as well.

Instead of a sawzall I use:

 - Angle grinder w/diamond blade on stucco
 - Spiral cutter w/ceramic tile bit on sheetrock (the ceramic bits last way longer than the HSS)
 - Circular saw for the major cuts on timber plus the spiral cutter to get tight into a corner.

Ryobi makes all three in the 18V One Plus line, and the new lithium ion batteries do a remarkable job. The batteries are good enough that the electrical tools are back under the workbench.



You are correct. What my years in construction have taught me is I cut a small opening and then look in and find what obstacles there may be before cutting a big opening. I still prefer sawzalls in many cases because of the ability for it to get into tight spaces.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: sjbees on February 13, 2009, 10:40:25 pm
> I cut a small opening and then look in and find what
> obstacles there may be before cutting a big opening.

The pipes and Romex I've encountered have often been completely concealed by drawn comb, and usually didn't find either one until well into the removal.

Nests that are in the partition below a window almost always have Romex running through them.

On 2-story houses I've run into water pipes a few inches below the top of the stud, totally invisible until the cutout was almost finished. Probably done during a retrofit that replaced galvanized with copper.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Robo on March 14, 2009, 07:48:02 am
The worst one I did was located right above the circuit breaker panel.   The romex wasn't invisible,  but boy was it a pain in the butt.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on March 14, 2009, 11:29:35 am
This one was a lot of fun. Went in from the outside and removed bees and brood and honey comb til the cows came home and then was greeted with a little 50lbs worth of surplus honey around a suspended light fixture.

Had to move all the lady's furniture to the other side of the room, take down her bed, pull the carpet back, cut the floor out, remove the monstrosity, then put everything back. And then I had to remove the other colony that was 5' over from this one!

(http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/6724/cimg1994.th.jpg) (http://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cimg1994.jpg)

(http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/5241/cimg2001.th.jpg) (http://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cimg2001.jpg)

(http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/2628/cimg2013.th.jpg) (http://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cimg2013.jpg)

(http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/4373/cimg2016.th.jpg) (http://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cimg2016.jpg)

(http://img164.imageshack.us/img164/710/cimg2019.th.jpg) (http://img164.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cimg2019.jpg)

I guess the good Lord wanted me to have a challenge on that day!


...JP




Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on March 14, 2009, 12:21:58 pm
you have gone back to image shack and i can't slideshow your cutouts  :-(   :-)

how long did that take you and how many boxes and  buckets did you fill??
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on March 14, 2009, 08:00:52 pm
you have gone back to image shack and i can't slideshow your cutouts  :-(   :-)

how long did that take you and how many boxes and  buckets did you fill??

Kathy, My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus

That is one job I would just like to forget, I had a lot of trouble making this customer happy. I moved the person up in my schedule to accommodate them and nothing I could do was good enough.

In the end all was well, but let's just say I was under a lot of pressure to do the impossible, to make this person happy, which I really believe no one can.

I know I made at least three trips out to this house. I got two hives out of it.


...JP

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Irwin on March 15, 2009, 08:35:05 am
Man thats alot of work and yes there are some people you just can't make happy :-x
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Bee Happy on April 23, 2009, 10:47:41 pm
That is one job I would just like to forget, I had a lot of trouble making this customer happy. I moved the person up in my schedule to accommodate them and nothing I could do was good enough....
...JP



I've been in this situation before in the electrical field.. extra demanding customers who want  you to drop everything and run to them and then fail to pay you or get obnoxious about paying (trust your gut - if you think they're gonna be a real hassle just don't deal with them) I got burned a couple times but developed an instinct.

my contribution to the cool tools? a luxury I know but... search "fiber optic wall scope" pricey, but you drill a 1/4" hole in the wall and poke the scope in for a look around (same with the drilled holes for pipe, romex, etc.)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on April 24, 2009, 12:42:43 am
Gadgets I have, problem is surplus honey. Some hives pack it on. Robo was nice enough to post a link for a borescope I wound up buying, actually I purchased two, the price was so good.

My old one broke but was much longer than I needed it to be. The new ones are perfect!

I like a good challenge, some say I am a glutton for punishment. I seem to like trying to turn yahoos in to good customers. Usually my patience wears them down if they are somewhat reasonable people.

I have walked on occasion, but it is rare that I do so.


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Robo on April 24, 2009, 07:24:10 am
Robo was nice enough to post a link for a borescope I wound up buying, actually I purchased two, the price was so good.

Here is the link for anyone that is interested.  I now have one in my toolbox :-D
http://www.etooldirect.com/diagnostic-tools-meters-27/provision-pv2618-2-5-8mm-7400-pixels-hi-def-borescope-2140.html
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: deknow on April 29, 2009, 10:26:03 am
We did an easy cutout last week:
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfD78B9ZfqI/AAAAAAAABBQ/pjKeIlXo7jc/s512/IMG_0449.JPG)

Ideally, I would have made up some Lusby style "swarm ketching frames", but i had limited time, and no frame wire in the house...so i used a method i saw jim tew use in a video....quick and easy way to tie combs into frames:

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfXaHabvbnI/AAAAAAAABEY/NK85rKbV7Y8/s640/IMG_0484.JPG)

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfXaJf5pfJI/AAAAAAAABEw/VwYyoVopgjE/s640/IMG_0487.JPG)
Nails on the top and bottom bars...next time, I'll use rubber bands on both ends of the string (this makes removing the string easier).

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/Sfc1yitHTdI/AAAAAAAABGo/_pxpwoOyIEQ/s640/IMG_0532.JPG)
This is 5-6 days after doing the cutout.  I was able to remove the strings from 7 of 8 frames.

More photos of the cutout can be found:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/Cutoutdevins
Details of the "Tew frames":
http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/TewFrame
More closeup pics from yesterday:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/RoyalWormsAndCutoutProgress

deknow
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on April 29, 2009, 11:00:40 am
very cool.  i'll look at the pics later so if this is answered already, my apologies.

when you remove the bands, do you also take out the nails?  if not, how do you keep them from making a mess if you can't keep the frames tight?
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: deknow on April 29, 2009, 11:12:50 am
when you remove the bands, do you also take out the nails?  if not, how do you keep them from making a mess if you can't keep the frames tight?

nails are just on the top and bottom bars, and don't extend far enough to interfere with one another.  remember, only the top sections of the side bars touch each other, never the top or bottom bars.

deknow
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: kathyp on April 29, 2009, 11:21:43 am
got it.  thanks!
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: joker1656 on June 16, 2009, 11:52:46 pm
I know this is an older thread, but it sure is helpful.  Great list.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Jim 134 on August 09, 2009, 03:54:42 pm
 

http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/Cutoutdevins
De
Quote from: deknow link=topic=13767.msg166084#msg166084 date=124101156W3
e did an easy cutout last week:
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfD78B9ZfqI/AAAAAAAABBQ/pjKeIlXo7jc/s512/IMG_0449.JPG)

Ideally, I would have made up some Lusby style "swarm ketching frames", but i had limited time, and no frame wire in the house...so i used a method i saw jim tew use in a video....quick and easy way to tie combs into frames:

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfXaHabvbnI/AAAAAAAABEY/NK85rKbV7Y8/s640/IMG_0484.JPG)

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/SfXaJf5pfJI/AAAAAAAABEw/VwYyoVopgjE/s640/IMG_0487.JPG)
Nails on the top and bottom bars...next time, I'll use rubber bands on both ends of the string (this makes removing the string easier).

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_t_b6U_NDhMw/Sfc1yitHTdI/AAAAAAAABGo/_pxpwoOyIEQ/s640/IMG_0532.JPG)
This is 5-6 days after doing the cutout.  I was able to remove the strings from 7 of 8 frames.

More photos of the cutout can be found:
tails of the "Tew frames":
http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/TewFrame
More closeup pics from yesterday:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/RoyalWormsAndCutoutProgress

deknow


 

 
 
 

Did this in the Peace Corps 1983-1985 in North Africa in Tunisia but use frame wire and nails.


            BEE HAPPY Jim 134   :)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: philinacoma on April 21, 2010, 05:19:22 am
For swarm collections in trees above 8 foot, I prefer a bucket on a pole to climbing a ladder while jugling everything.

You raise the bucket to the swarm, give it a little upwards jab to dislodge the bees then empty them into your waiting box. Much quicker too.

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: G3farms on April 21, 2010, 09:44:04 am
I saw another bucket on a pole idea the other day...........they used a 5 gallon plastic water carboy with the bottom cut off and pvc pipe used for the poles. Worked great in his video, let you see what was going on through the clear plastic.

G3
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Apis_M_Rescue on May 19, 2010, 05:19:35 am
Do you have a link to that video? Hear of swarm catching net as well. Was readying bamboo poles attached to 5 gallon planter pots but that idea sounds more stable. Also anyone try using a mirror reflected on swarm to lower w/ any success?
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: G3farms on May 19, 2010, 10:17:39 am
Honey bee swarm capture using BEE BUCKET (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FAiOB9MzIY#)

Here is the link, it was just one of those swarms that worked out perfect for a catch.

G3
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on May 19, 2010, 10:23:25 am
Honey bee swarm capture using BEE BUCKET (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FAiOB9MzIY#)

Here is the link, it was just one of those swarms that worked out perfect for a catch.

G3

Very Nicely done!


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: annette on May 19, 2010, 11:40:15 pm
Do they sell anything like that in the catalogs that would work as well?? for G3 farms
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: bull on May 20, 2010, 02:01:42 am
Im realy enjoying this subject.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Apis_M_Rescue on May 20, 2010, 04:59:40 am
Thanks G3 for the link. Thats a more stable design than my bamboo one. Will find materials to put one together soon.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: G3farms on May 20, 2010, 03:38:11 pm
Just to let you know that was not me nor was it my design. I just thought it was a good idea since you could see where the bees were in relation to the bucket.

Annette........yes there is something similar to this sold in catalogs, uses a 5 gallon bucket and some electrical conduit for the pole.

I think the handle in the video is made out of a wooden dowel for a closet rod with some pvc pipe fittings.

G3

here is a link to one, but I think for $30 and shipping you could build one much cheaper!!

http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Hipps-Swarm-Retriever/productinfo/270/ (http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Hipps-Swarm-Retriever/productinfo/270/)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: annette on May 20, 2010, 09:20:43 pm
Thanks for the info.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Apis_M_Rescue on June 10, 2010, 05:03:31 am
Anyone here remove a hive from manholes? Seen these magnetic manhole removing tools but quite pricey:

Manhole Removing Tools (http://www.mkdiamonddirect.com/category.sc?categoryId=103&gclid=CKqmuvD6lKICFRlRagodTj8fEg)

Might have to call the city Thursday to see if they will assist in helping lift manhole to rescue this new hive.

Cheers, David
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Jim 134 on June 10, 2010, 06:18:23 am
Anyone here remove a hive from manholes? Seen these magnetic manhole removing tools but quite pricey:

Manhole Removing Tools (http://www.mkdiamonddirect.com/category.sc?categoryId=103&gclid=CKqmuvD6lKICFRlRagodTj8fEg)

Might have to call the city Thursday to see if they will assist in helping lift manhole to rescue this new hive.

Cheers, David


     I work for a DPW we use crow bars. If it is city owe and you do not call the city you may go to jail  it may cost you  $$$$$  :roll:


                           BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: beekeeper1756 on July 06, 2010, 07:22:28 pm
My list of tools for doing a cutout would include the following:

1.  Power box to transfer power from my truck to the shop vac I use.
2.  Shop vac for sucking up the bees.
3.  Bee box that I made for holding the bees, vacuuming them up as I go, less bees to fight.
4.  Battery operated Saws-All with extra battery fully charged.  Had one go down on me on a cutout once and stopped everything.
5.  Pry bar.
6.  Saw horses, and 8 ft. of 1x10 plank.  Great for setting the bee box and shop vac on when doing the cutout.
7.  Baby wipes, to wipe all the nectar and honey off as we go.  It's a messy process.
8.  Medium box with at least 2 frames of brood and 2 frames of honey or nectar.  I used to do just foundation but have found out that using the frames of brood and honey calms the bees down over night.  By the next morning, when I have the bees, they are all busy at work with a job to do, covering the frames of brood and honey, transfer was a dream.  I learned this on my last cutout, sadly not the first or life would have been so much easier.
9.  Something very cold to drink with a straw has saved me on so many cutouts.  In my full beesuit, I get so overheated.  By using a straw in my drink, I'm able to slightly unzip my suit just far enough to stick the straw thru and get a good drink.  Saved me so many times.  When temps are in the high 90s or low 100s, it's hot.
10.  Extension cord to transfer power from the box to the shop vac.
11.  Jumper Battery cables to get power from the battery to the power inverter.


Anyway, that's my basic list.  Feel free to add to the list.

Good luck.

P.S. Being a new beek, doing cutouts has surely been an excellent way to add to the number of my hives.  I always try to get some of the honey back to the landowner who gave me permission to tear up some building or structure to get at the bees.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: David McLeod on October 31, 2010, 03:14:55 pm
A tool that I find useful is an angled scraper that can be found in the paint dept. It has a handle that screws onto a paint roller extension pole. Short sections of extension pole and this scraper can reach back into cavities for comb removal. Another is a hook (monster hook) available from the big box stores that clips onto your belt for hanging drills and saws from. Sure is handy 30' up a ladder. While on the subject of ladders, the louisville protop ladders have a top similar to those on a step ladder attached to the top of the fly section. This top piece also has non marking rubber inserts that rest against the walls plus a conrner cutout for corner or pole work. All in all this is a very handy addition to the ladder as a place to hold tools while working. It only comes on their fiberglass ladders up to 28'.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: bigbearomaha on November 20, 2010, 09:03:07 pm
 :lol:  Oh man, I am SO gonna make me one of those pole buckets.  looks easy enough.  cut bottom off a water bottle and a wood/pvc pole at the neck..

why don't I ever think of those cool things?

Big Bear
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: gardeningfireman on January 18, 2011, 09:30:04 am
Regarding manholes: stay out of them! They may contain electrical equipment, sewage, toxic/flammable/explosive gases, etc. Not to mention they are classified as a confined space. We on the fire dept. don't even go in them! No bee colony is worth a trip to the hospital or morgue! :'(
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: G3farms on January 18, 2011, 10:43:20 am
Not to mention a man hole and the pipe line is private property owned by the sewer, water, electric, telephone, etc., etc. company. They can impose a fine/jail time for messing with them
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on March 08, 2011, 07:32:36 pm
The Multi-tool I have come to realize is a Godsend for anyone performing removals where wood of any type needs to be cut. It has virtually eliminated the need for a Rotozip and my Sawzall doesn't get much play anymore either. Great for cutting sheetrock as well. Not too good on plaster though.

The multi-tool should really be added to the main list IMO.

I purchased one from Harbor Freight for about $39.00, regular price is $59.00. Found them on sale within the last year for $29.00 and bought two more but still using the first one.

Can't beat it for the price, fantastic tool folks!

http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html)


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: montauk170 on March 11, 2011, 12:43:21 am
FYI, that same tool is on sale online for $39.99
but today I received their paper with a coupon for only $29.99. Limit only 5 but you probably only need one unless you do more cutouts than JP.  :-D
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Mike Tuggle on May 24, 2011, 12:18:36 am
 :? Re: the Harbor Freight tool... a question for JP or anyone using this for cut-outs.  HF sells an additional blade kit for ~$10.  Do we need that or are the included blades good enough for wallboard and the usual 1/4" soffet panel?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on May 24, 2011, 12:33:39 am
Mike, included in the box are a few different type heads that will get you by on your first few jobs.

http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html)

The second head from the left is the one I prefer to use and they just started selling that same head in black by itself for $7.99. I would skip on the $10.00 kit and just buy the heads you want.


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Mike Tuggle on May 24, 2011, 10:20:50 am
Thanks! I just got a flyer for the tool on sale for $29.99 -- with their discount coupon for 20% off on one item, the extra head is paid for.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on May 24, 2011, 12:19:01 pm
Hey. I think they also throw in a free scissors with the deal at least they did here, don't forget to ask!  :-D


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Mike Tuggle on May 24, 2011, 11:39:50 pm
No scissors but they were giving away 25' tape measures.  (Hey, you never have enuf of them.)  ;)  First time in years that I popped $10 for 2-year replacement coverage.  Figured plaster dust from cutouts in the brushes might justify it.

Mike
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Bee Brothers Apiary on June 30, 2011, 11:14:39 am
I got the scissors. Thanks for the headsup  8-)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: montauk170 on June 30, 2011, 01:27:28 pm
The new style multi-tool at HF only $19.99!!!!

Coupon
http://images.harborfreight.com/hftweb/newhome11/images/multitool19a.jpg (http://images.harborfreight.com/hftweb/newhome11/images/multitool19a.jpg)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Mike Tuggle on July 05, 2011, 11:38:50 am
One thing I didn't see in any of the lists is a "cutting board" to have a place to do comb cutting and frame tie-ins.  We can always use a piece of corrugated sign board but I saw a really nice poly cutting board, with a handle, at Gander Mountain (in the fishing department) last week for only $14.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Judy in in on July 31, 2011, 12:08:05 am
I just finished 3 cut-outs at the area Department of Transportation, in their mixing shed. This is what I used:
1. Scaffolding to reach 15'.
2. Flatbed trailer to haul scaffolding, vacuum, and deep super for  brood.
2. Pick-up to pull trailer and haul everything else.
3. Bee Vacuum from Bushkillfarms. Didn't have time to build one.
4. Skilsaw, drywall saw (really great) bread knife, cat's claw and hammer (for wire cables) extension cords, queen catcher, small strap to tie vacuum hose to trusses. (kept weight off me) rubber bands for frames, paper towels, playtex gloves, hive tool.
5. Ladder to reach scaffolding.
6 Several clean buckets; 1 with water, and 2 totes for brood.
7. Sprayer with vanilla water or peppermint oil and water. (I don't use smoke for a cut-out)
8. Small pieces of wood to keep the brood comb separate in the tote.
9. SBB for brood super, and screened top. (heat index was 100+)
10. Sweatband and clean rags. (self-explanatory)
11. Ratchet straps for the brood super and vacuum.

After I removed the brood comb and honey, I used the flatbed as my table to put the comb in the frames. I started out using a Sawsall, but went back to the Skilsaw.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on September 19, 2011, 12:02:17 pm
Hi All,

Because the original was posted so long ago. I cannot modify it anymore. So what I have done is made it into a google doc. So it can be updated as needed.

So notes on the changes.

When I first made the list I was not doing cut outs professionally. I am doing them professionally now. The original list is still a very good list but some of the changes in the new list reflect the changes that have happened to me over the years.

There are comments in the google doc. You can read the comments by moving your mouse over the little orange triangle in the upper right corner. Comments include my usual snarky nature.

I did not put scaffolding or extension ladders on it as they are usually rented by me. Since I do not have enough call for them to buy them for the permanent tool collection.

When I made the list years ago the housing bubble had not burst. Now it has and a generator is probably a good idea even if it is just a small one.

You can view the tools for cut outs list here.

http://tinyurl.com/cutouttools (http://tinyurl.com/cutouttools)

If you go to print the list. It is downloaded as a PDF and you print the pdf. The comments come on pages 2 and 3 so you really only need to print the first page.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: tedlemay on January 11, 2012, 10:59:40 pm
How many cut outs do you get calls for a year?
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on January 11, 2012, 11:28:08 pm
How many cut outs do you get calls for a year?

A lot. I have 3 people who work for me on doing cut outs.

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: tedlemay on January 12, 2012, 06:48:22 pm
Wow. Guess in a sub-tropic climate bees thrive better than other places. Are there a lot of africanized hives there?
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on January 12, 2012, 06:55:03 pm
Wow. Guess in a sub-tropic climate bees thrive better than other places. Are there a lot of africanized hives there?

I hope so they are the only ones that survive.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Bee Busters on January 18, 2012, 12:44:52 pm
does anyone keep a clipboard with billing invoices on their tool list?
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Understudy on January 19, 2012, 10:01:55 pm
does anyone keep a clipboard with billing invoices on their tool list?

I have keep a clipboard with the tool list.
Invoices in the field are a slightly different issue.
1) Invoices are not a tool per se.
2) Not everyone charges for cut outs or can charge.
3) With my company invoices are dealt with in the office mainly. Sometimes if the customer asks I will or an employee will bring a copy of the invoice with them if the customer is going to pay then and there. However i personally prefer to have the employees worry about doing the cut out and not have to worry about the money.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: jredburn on March 10, 2012, 09:52:12 pm
Greetings Y'all
I built a bee vac from plans on another site and the thing works well until it starts to fill up with bees, then they clog up the hardware cloth so air cannot get through to the vacuum and it quits working.  It is basically a box within a box with a shop vacuum head attached at the back end.
Has anyone ever made or used a cyclone type separator for collecting bees?   i would love some plans or directions.
Regards
Joe
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: jredburn on March 11, 2012, 02:11:41 pm
Two items I keep in the truck are a package of Benadyl  tablets and a small can of spray WD 40. 
I take a Benadyl tablet before I start a cut out and the WD 40 helps cut the reaction if I get stung.
Regards
Joe
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: beek1951 on June 28, 2012, 12:11:04 am
Of course there is JP. Prince Albert can with nail holes.
Wonerbar, the beekeepers friend.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Danpunch on June 29, 2012, 04:48:04 pm
Greetings Y'all
I built a bee vac from plans on another site and the thing works well until it starts to fill up with bees, then they clog up the hardware cloth so air cannot get through to the vacuum and it quits working.  It is basically a box within a box with a shop vacuum head attached at the back end.
Has anyone ever made or used a cyclone type separator for collecting bees?   i would love some plans or directions.
Regards
Joe

Why not build a second (or third too) box and swap 'em out when they get full? Another option would be to build a "bushkill bee vac". I built one based on that and it has worked like a charm. A quick search on the google machine should get you the plans for one.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: SkepWrangler on July 17, 2012, 02:38:58 am
...then they clog up the hardware cloth so air cannot get through to the vacuum and it quits working. 
Hi Joe,
Question about the screen clogging up.  Are these healthy bees clogging it up, or bees that are sticky or otherwise impaired?
Thanks,
SkepWrangler
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Roy Coates on September 06, 2012, 12:11:15 am
excellent tool tips, I have one of each(most anyway)
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: divemaster1963 on September 06, 2012, 12:20:32 am
These are some nice tools to have when doing a cut out when you need them.
I made these and they worked great. I gave a set to David Mcleod to try. I hope he liked them.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,37611.0.html (http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,37611.0.html)

John
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Intheswamp on September 06, 2012, 02:52:08 pm

http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html)

The second head from the left is the one I prefer to use and they just started selling that same head in black by itself for $7.99. I would skip on the $10.00 kit and just buy the heads you want.
...JP

JP, would you mind pointing out again which blade works best for you?  It looks like HF might have changed the webpage a bit.

Thanks,
Ed
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JP on September 06, 2012, 03:28:49 pm

http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html)

The second head from the left is the one I prefer to use and they just started selling that same head in black by itself for $7.99. I would skip on the $10.00 kit and just buy the heads you want.
...JP

JP, would you mind pointing out again which blade works best for you?  It looks like HF might have changed the webpage a bit.

Thanks,
Ed

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-38-hcs-multi-tool-plunge-blade-68904.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/1-38-hcs-multi-tool-plunge-blade-68904.html)


...JP
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Intheswamp on September 07, 2012, 01:47:06 am
Thanks,

Ed
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JPBEEGETTER on September 13, 2012, 10:59:18 am
I have a portable generator, for those places with no electricity. 

David
[/Oh yes you definitly need a little generator. If you use corded tools it's a Bi***H , not to have power Out in the boonies.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JPBEEGETTER on September 13, 2012, 11:04:21 am
Also as jp sayes a multi-tool   , Its on sale right now for $17.99 and thats a bargin , gave 29.95 for mine..I have a lot of Harbor Freight tools , they are bargin ,,but won't last forever, But neither will I  77 now and still going..JPP.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: JPBEEGETTER on September 17, 2012, 05:54:06 pm
does anyone keep a clipboard with billing invoices on their tool list?
[/
I do also contract .
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: jpmeir on March 07, 2013, 06:49:20 pm
This is not a tool per say but I bought a golden bee product full suit. It arrived today, very nice suit, golden bee stated it will work against Africaized bees something we have here in texas.  I'll let you know how it works on the little devels
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Intheswamp on March 07, 2013, 08:00:53 pm
Nice tool, there, jpmeir!  ;) Quality product.

Ed
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: greg755 on April 16, 2013, 05:29:25 pm
If you have some delicate work to do and you want to keep damages to a minium you can use one of those Fien tools (or knock off) and or a rotozip...
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Jackam on June 10, 2013, 12:28:38 am
I LOVE the rotozip!
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: Sharpbees on January 20, 2014, 01:44:57 pm
To help keep things clean I use a camp shower. You can hang it in the sun so that the water is warm which makes cleaning up much easier.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: rgrbecvar on August 07, 2014, 08:20:46 pm
I have and use most of the tools listed in most of the posts. I also keep a Zircon Stud Finder to find the studs, hot electrical wires and pipes hiding behind the walls.  I also make sure I bring enough drywall pieces, tape and mud to repair walls that I have to breach. I like to also bring a piece of plywood and a couple saw horses for a work bench so I don't have to reach and bend anymore than I need to.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: jayj200 on December 31, 2014, 10:47:49 pm
Along with most of the things ya'll mentioned, one thing you didn't, which comes in real handy at times. A queen catcher.


...JP
Ya the new stainless ones
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: GDRankin on February 05, 2015, 04:38:16 pm
One thing I didn't see mentioned, maybe because it's not an actual tool - or maybe I just missed it, is knee pads. They are something I added to my tote after a couple of floor cutouts and spending a good deal of time on my knees. They are one of those things that you can surely do without if you don't have them, but they sure make for a much more comfortable job and may save your knees.

I bought a pair that have Velcro straps so they are easy off and on.
After using them once, I don't leave home without them if I may be working on my knees.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: KeyLargoBees on August 05, 2015, 10:54:19 am
+1 on the knee pads.....might also add a yoga mat or some such in the event you need to lay down on rough ground and work under a floor or a trailer....sort of a specialized item not needed for all jobs but nice to have handy in the right situation.
Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: GDRankin on August 23, 2015, 06:42:57 pm
10-4 on the yoga mat or something of the sort to lay on for those downunder jobs.

One more thing that I've added that may help (and I didn't notice posted above) is a piece of 1.5" or so PVC pipe/tube. A long section of tubing can come in real handy when you get in a situation where it's hard to get some smoke in an area you may not be able to fit into or reach. I've been able to run bees out of an addict space back into the soffit using this method and it saved me from having to cut another access hole in the customer's ceiling.

Title: Re: Tools for the cutout.
Post by: sawdstmakr on August 28, 2015, 06:11:30 am
GD,
I will have to keep that in mind about getting smoke back in the corners. I have used a long piece of pipe but I used it to vacuum up bees way in the corner of an attic where I did not want to crawl into.
Jim