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Author Topic: Honey for topical uses  (Read 708 times)

Offline Occam

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Honey for topical uses
« on: November 03, 2023, 02:48:37 pm »
I've read quite a few articles extolling the virtues for honey as a healing agent for cuts, scrapes, eye injuries, in a compress for promoting healing after delivering babies, etc. The lists are quite extensive. I've used it myself on a few cuts that required bandages and while I can't prove they reduced scarring, I think the honey likely minimized the scars from what they could have been in comparison to other cuts /scars I've received. I make myself sound like I walk around bleeding, but I'm not really that bad, honest.

I also roast my coffee in the garage with a drum roaster I built a few years ago. Way better than any coffee in the stores, for sure. I decided to roast some beans last night, some Ethiopian Yirgacheffe which were nice and even lending well to a good roast.

Before I got started I thought I'd apply some honey to my scalp to see if it'll help with dry/scaly scalp which nothing else helps with. Nothing. 9:1 honey to water ratio. Supposed to do it a couple times a week and let it set for a couple hours each time which is why I thought doing it while roasting coffee was a good idea. So we'll see how it goes.

I will say it made a nice stiff shiny helmet out of my hair if nothing else. I did think I should remember not to do this during warmer weather with the garage door open, not unless I want lots of visitors  :cheesy:

The coffee needs to offgas for a couple days before it reaches its peak flavor, so come Sunday I'll have a really good cup of coffee. And probably some tomorrow as well, just might be a little bright flavored than ideal.
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2023, 04:02:39 pm »
I have never used honey on a wound, since I make a herbal salve that works really well for that, but I do use honey as an ingredient in burn cream, and it works really well on sunburns or just normal heat burns.  Here's a link to the recipe.  https://beemaster.com/forum/index.php?topic=55224.0
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Offline Lesgold

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2023, 04:28:55 pm »
A spoonful of honey is a great way of easing a sore throat when a cold is coming on. It never fails to provide relief.

Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2023, 05:29:54 pm »
A spoonful of honey is a great way of easing a sore throat when a cold is coming on. It never fails to provide relief.
This is true. I used to deliver some kind of honey or honey derivative that the woman called medicinal honey. I believe it came from AU, maybe NZ. It was packaged in about 3 oz jars (I don't know how many grams that is) and a 2000 lb pallet was worth an obscene amount of money. Like at least $100,000, according to her.

Offline Occam

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2023, 05:43:38 pm »
Was it Manuka honey?
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Offline Occam

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2023, 05:45:36 pm »
I have never used honey on a wound, since I make a herbal salve that works really well for that, but I do use honey as an ingredient in burn cream, and it works really well on sunburns or just normal heat burns.  Here's a link to the recipe.  https://beemaster.com/forum/index.php?topic=55224.0

Always a great use for honey. I wouldn't say I enjoy using it for that but it is quite effective

A spoonful of honey is a great way of easing a sore throat when a cold is coming on. It never fails to provide relief.

I love a good mug of hot honey water with ginger and garlic when I feel a cold coming on
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Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2023, 05:59:40 pm »
Was it Manuka honey?
I have no idea what it was.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2023, 08:58:34 pm »
Source:
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/manuka-honey-medicinal-uses


Manuka Honey
Medically Reviewed by Kumar Shital, DO on September 18, 2023
Written by Joseph Saling

Healing Power of Honey

Components of Manuka Honey
How Manuka Honey Is Used
What the Science Says About Manuka Honey

3 min read
Manuka honey is made in Australia and New Zealand by bees that pollinate the native leptospermum scoparium bush (also known as a tea tree). Advocates say it can treat wound infections and other conditions.

Healing Power of Honey
Honey has been used since ancient times to treat multiple conditions. It wasn't until the late 19th century that researchers discovered that honey has natural antibacterial qualities.

Honey protects the body against damage caused by bacteria. Some honeys also boost the production of special cells that can repair tissue damaged by infection. Manuka honey has an anti-inflammatory action that can help ease pain and inflammation.

However, not all honey is the same. The antibacterial quality of honey depends on the type of honey as well as when and how it's harvested. Some kinds may be 100 times more potent than others.

Components of Manuka Honey
Hydrogen peroxide gives most honey its antibiotic quality. But some types, including Manuka honey, also have unique antimicrobial qualities.


One of the major antibacterial components of Manuka honey is a compound called methylglyoxal (MGO). MGO comes from the conversion of another compound in Manuka honey known as dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a high concentration of which is found in the nectar of Manuka flowers.

The higher the concentration of MGO, the stronger the antibacterial effect.


Honey producers have a scale for rating the potency of Manuka honey. The rating is called UMFTM, which stands for Unique Manuka Factor.

The UMFTM rating reflects the concentration of 3 signature compounds found in genuine Manuka honey, MGO, DHA, and leptosperin. To be considered potent enough to be therapeutic, Manuka honey needs a minimum rating of UMF? 10+. However, doctors and researchers aren?t sure if this rating means anything from a medical standpoint

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How Manuka Honey Is Used
The main medical use for Manuka honey is for wound and burn healing. It is generally used for treating minor wounds and burns. Research shows Manuka honey to be effective in treating other conditions, including:

Skin conditions including eczema and dermatitis
Soothing a cough or sore throat
Digestive Health
But the evidence is limited on whether it works for these conditions.

The honey used to treat wounds is medical-grade honey. It is specially sterilized and prepared as a dressing. So the jar of Manuka honey in the pantry shouldn?t be part of your first aid kit. Wounds and infections should be seen and treated by a health care professional.

What the Science Says About Manuka Honey

Several recent studies show Manuka honey can be helpful when it?s used on wounds and leg ulcers. Studies also show it might fight infection and boost healing.

The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database lists honey as being "possibly effective" to treat burns and wounds. The Cochrane Review notes that honey may shorten healing times in mild burns and surgical wounds compared with traditional dressings. But they also say more research needs to be done.


Another study suggests that Manuka honey may help prevent gingivitis and other periodontal disease by reducing the buildup of plaque. In some studies, Manuka honey seemed to help prevent inflammation in the esophagus caused by radiation and chemotherapy used for cancer.

Another possible benefit of honey is that, unlike antibiotics, it doesn?t appear to lead to resistant bacteria. These so-called "superbugs" develop after repeated exposure to common antibiotics. Special antibiotics are needed to treat them.

Most of the studies on Manuka honey have been with small numbers of people, and so far, research hasn?t shown that Manuka honey helps with high cholesterol or balancing the bacteria in the gut. Furthermore, no major studies have looked at the effect of Manuka honey on cancer, diabetes, or fungal infections.

Possible Side Effects of Manuka Honey
These may include:


     * Allergic reaction, especially in people who are allergic to bees
     * A rise in blood sugar if large quantities are consumed
     * Effects on certain chemotherapy drugs and interactions with various other medicines.
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2023, 06:56:32 am »
I just roasted some Mexican this morning.  I bought a few different coffee roasters, but now i use an air popcorn popper.  It works just as good and costs a lot less.
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Offline Terri Yaki

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2023, 08:15:40 am »
I just roasted some Mexican this morning.  I bought a few different coffee roasters, but now i use an air popcorn popper.  It works just as good and costs a lot less.
I haven't roasted any Mexican since I was in high school (OK, maybe a year or two after high school). But that is an interesting use of the popcorn popper.

Offline Occam

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2023, 03:40:19 pm »
Popcorn poppers work well from what I've read, fluid bed roasting is a legitimate way of getting it done. I started roasting beans in a clay pot over a propane grill flame then built a drum roaster. Much easier and reliable way of doing it. I would definitely like to try a popcorn popper though.
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2023, 12:04:22 pm »
I wouldn't mind a larger batch, but the popcorn popper works pretty well and is cheap and easy.  I have to prop the front up a little to keep it from blowing out beans from the air it blows.
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Offline Occam

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2023, 11:58:26 pm »
How long have you been roasting your own coffee?
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2023, 06:09:00 am »
I'm not sure.  At least 15 years.
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Offline JurassicApiary

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Re: Honey for topical uses
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2023, 01:17:40 pm »

Before I got started I thought I'd apply some honey to my scalp to see if it'll help with dry/scaly scalp which nothing else helps with. Nothing. 9:1 honey to water ratio. Supposed to do it a couple times a week and let it set for a couple hours each time which is why I thought doing it while roasting coffee was a good idea.


Occam, in times where Head & Shoulder's dandruff shampoo hasn't worked for me, I switch to a product called Nizoral.  It's more potent (hence I only use it when needed) and uses a different formulation...I am always able to nip dandruff/dry scalp issues (which are usually caused by a fungus)...which Nizoral specifically targets.

Nizoral:  https://a.co/d/aRbbM6x

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