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OK let me understand this:  You shift the first frame now don't you have to return the frame to home position so you can insert the tool in the next frame?  And so on... that first frame is going up and down 10 times to get to the last one.  You can't get to interior frames without actuation frames from the side the tool is inserted.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Obtaining Nucs
« Last post by Michael Bush on Today at 06:07:13 am »
>Not always, but queens tend to lay in dark brood comb no matter the location.

It's funny.  A queen's favorite comb to lay in is brand new comb, but next is old black comb...
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FARMING & COUNTRY LIFE / Re: Breaking a Broody Hen
« Last post by Michael Bush on Today at 06:06:14 am »
I have a queen incubator that has one of those nice digital controllers in it.  I'm not sure how well the box would do for chicken eggs though...  The Monkey Ward one has an incandescent light bulb (now illegal) for it's heat source.  It was not as stable temperature wise as the queen incubator is.  Maybe I should look it over.  I might be able to detatch the controler and put it in the chicken incubator.  It's about time to hatch some chicks  Maybe next month but at least by April.
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PHOTO PAGE - MEMBER PHOTOS & BEE-MOVIES HERE! / Early Mason
« Last post by The15thMember on Today at 12:02:58 am »
We had a cold day a few days ago where we had the wood stove going, and due to the warmth in the house, a long-horned mason bee emerged out of one of our pieces of wood.  It was too cold to put him outside, so I put him in a jar with a mesh lid and gave him a Q-tip soaked in sugar water, which he gladly drank from.  He spent the night in the house, and then when it warmed up the next day, I released him.  I found the log with the nest in it and pulled it out of the pile destined for the fire so the females, along with any more males, can hatch a little later in the spring.   
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Obtaining Nucs
« Last post by beesnweeds on February 22, 2024, 06:07:36 pm »
Would I not end up with brood in the honey super?
You could.  Not always, but queens tend to lay in dark brood comb no matter the location.  I try and keep brood and honey frames separate.  Personally I would put on a QE and be done with it.  All beekeepers manage differently, its really up to you.  Just make sure you keep feed on them so they build up to the configuration you want (like 2 deeps 3 mediums or whatever) then remove the feeder and add your supers.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Obtaining Nucs
« Last post by Terri Yaki on February 22, 2024, 04:09:39 pm »
Why put the deep on top?  Just put the deep on the bottom and let the bees do what is natural.  They will move the broodnest down when they start filling the medium with honey.
Would I not end up with brood in the honey super?
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FARMING & COUNTRY LIFE / Re: Breaking a Broody Hen
« Last post by Kathyp on February 22, 2024, 03:59:00 pm »
Quote
By the time this discussion is over, we might all be chick hatching experts

To your question, the dry membrane issue should not happen with the newer incubators.  I suggest you get a cheap temp/humidity digital device to put in the incubator and brooder.  I got a really good one a couple of years ago and I don't think I paid even 10 dollars on Amazon.  It has lasted through chick poop in the brooder so I am happy to have gotten it   :cheesy:
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Obtaining Nucs
« Last post by cao on February 22, 2024, 02:52:30 pm »
Why put the deep on top?  Just put the deep on the bottom and let the bees do what is natural.  They will move the broodnest down when they start filling the medium with honey.
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FARMING & COUNTRY LIFE / Re: Breaking a Broody Hen
« Last post by Ben Framed on February 22, 2024, 02:34:01 pm »
lol  By the time this discussion is over, we might all be chick hatching experts!  :grin:  :cheesy:
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FARMING & COUNTRY LIFE / Re: Breaking a Broody Hen
« Last post by Kathyp on February 22, 2024, 02:25:37 pm »
Quote
There is some transpiration of moisture from their skin (like any animal) but no sweat.

Lol.  OK.  Is hen moisture anti-microbial?  If you shove your hand under a broody hen it's pretty damp under there   :grin:
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