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I'm trying to make some wise crack about how a 17 minute video is too long and I can't watch it at 1.5x speed, but nothing clever is coming to me.  :wink:  :cheesy:

Hum, :wink:  now where have we heard that before?  :cheesy: :wink:
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That's a very clever solution, I like that. Thanks for the share Jim. That may also help minimize or eliminate the damage permits do the woodenware over there. I was listening to a Treatment Free Beekeeping podcast on Spotify and his gues was recounting his time working with beekeepers over there. They would make top bar type hives but cast them with concrete. The langstroth type hives they put up on legs and used glass coke or beer bottles to deter the termites from climbing.

I am curious about the ability to work the field right next to them though. In the same podcast he indicated the bees were very aggressive starting to bump and warn them when they were a few hundred feet away, sometimes more, and get more aggressive as they got closer. The people he was working with wore several layers of clothing to prevent stings since they didn't have suits. Didn't sounds like a pleasant experience.  Thankful for my gentle bees no matter how "aggressive" or upset they get.
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What, no larvaes?  :cheesy: That cup faces upwards but there sure looks like a larva in there to me. It looks like about three cups all in one spot, which is not what I recall seeing queen cells looking like. But they are bigger than drone brood. And that page does help me see what they should and shouldn't look like, thanks. 
Perhaps the next time you go in you could get a picture of it, but it doesn't sound like a queen cell to me.

As long as they're as methodical as I am and work their frames before trying to move into the penthouse I'll be in good shape because they're not building comb too quickly and there's still three or four frames for them to build on. I have those portholes in the side and I peek in there every day to see what they're up to. Not too many go up there except to get at the syrup and to let me know I'm too early if it's still cold out. They do cluster in that hole pretty heavily though, for some reason.
Oh, I forgot you have those windows, that's got to be handy.  They may be clustering in the hole to help with temperature control.

And I was afraid I'd jerk them into a defensive mode if I gave that cover too much of a whack.

My bees at least hate the brush more.  A single whack or shake and they are just kind of disoriented, whereas my bees will sometimes try and attack the brush, especially if they are a little riled already and especially if they get tangled in it.  Bees hate being stuck in hair.

How do you like my hive tool? I kind of like the size of it and I don't have to put it down while I'm working. That means I don't have to look around to see where I left it.  :cool:
 
I noticed you using it!  Isn't it awesome?!  Now you understand why I couldn't live without it.  :grin:   
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What, no larvaes?  :cheesy: That cup faces upwards but there sure looks like a larva in there to me. It looks like about three cups all in one spot, which is not what I recall seeing queen cells looking like. But they are bigger than drone brood. And that page does help me see what they should and shouldn't look like, thanks. As long as they're as methodical as I am and work their frames before trying to move into the penthouse I'll be in good shape because they're not building comb too quickly and there's still three or four frames for them to build on. I have those portholes in the side and I peek in there every day to see what they're up to. Not too many go up there except to get at the syrup and to let me know I'm too early if it's still cold out. They do cluster in that hole pretty heavily though, for some reason. And I was afraid I'd jerk them into a defensive mode if I gave that cover too much of a whack. How do you like my hive tool? I kind of like the size of it and I don't have to put it down while I'm working. That means I don't have to look around to see where I left it.  :cool:
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I'm trying to make some wise crack about how a 17 minute video is too long and I can't watch it at 1.5x speed, but nothing clever is coming to me.  :wink:  :cheesy:

I think your inspection technique looks really great for a beginner.  You are methodical, careful, keeping a mind on the bees as individuals, and all your movements are slow and deliberate.  You kept all your frames in the same orientation after removing them, and you smoked them at the right time and in the right amount.  And the bees responded by being calm and accommodating.  Good job!  I think you look like a natural.  :happy:

It's hard to see on the camera, but I don't think that's a queen cell, it just looked like a drone cell in worker comb to me.  Was the opening to the cell in question on the bottom of the cell?  As in, was the cell vertically oriented instead of horizontally oriented?  That is the distinction.  There are some great pictures of queen cups in this article which may help confirm or deny your suspicions.  https://blog.foxhoundbeecompany.com/what-is-a-queen-cup/   

Just want to mention, although you probably know this, to keep a close mind on how fast they are drawing because you don't want them to expand up into that empty box with the syrup and start drawing comb in there.  When I feed syrup, I just put the jar right onto the hole in the inner cover (and sometimes tape over the excess if the hole is large), which keeps the bees from accessing that empty box.  I think the way you have it is fine, but be sure they have enough space or you could have a mess on your hands. 

A little bit of a tip for the bees who were on the lid: if you give the top of the lid a stiff whack with your hand (making sure you don't smack any bees first, of course!), that can help to dislodge them.  Generally a stiff shake is the way to get bees to release their grip on anything.  Also, be careful turning frames all the way sideways or upsidedown in hot weather.  Nothing here was a problem, but when it's warm and wax is soft and loaded with honey, it can be.  Just something to keep in mind.   

Lastly, just a tiny little point of correction, if you'll indulge me.  There is no such word as "larvaes".  Larvae is plural, larva is singular.  :rolleyes:     
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My first hive inspection is complete and all looks good to me except that I expected to see more pollen in there. It's not like they're not bringing it in. Since I'm technically challenged and my GoPro clips videos at about 17 minutes, I have to present it in two parts. If any one wants to take the time to watch and give me advice on what I might have done wrong, I'd welcome the opportunity to improve my ways.  :cheesy:  I found what may well be a queen cell and I showed it the best I could at 13:40 in Part I. It does have larva in it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pA_E8_nkTTg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibhxZbuQTsg
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first car.. acquired and started on it when I was 14. Drove it for years and never considered it "finished" .. a '61 Austin-Healy 3000 . Doesn't run right now, but maybe I'll get around to restoring it after I'm done paying for kids.  :cheesy:

btw ... "beast" is a different car, a modified 1954 BN1 rust bucket with a 302 Chevy and a B&M hydro-stick trans. Next version of it will be a blown 400/400 turbo .. have motor, blower and trans. but a lot of work ahead
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Jim,
That is really interesting. I wonder if the number of hives is too high to allow each hive to make excessive honey. If the area can support that many hives it would bee a really good win win.
The bees must not be as bad as our Africanized Bees for them to bee able to work the fields right next to the hives.
Jim Altmiller
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I don't restore them, I just nurse them along and I have always been of the opinion that it would be cheaper to just buy one that someone else restored, as long as the work was good.
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Are you interested in older vehicles? This fellow explains why, in his opinion classic vehicles cost so much. Parts, paint, hours spent, etc. This seems to be a popular hobby these days. Have any of you attempted to restore an older vehicle?

Very short clip...
https://youtube.com/shorts/IPY0BOQ1C9U?si=-hkRpzCi9iUg41NR
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