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Online Occam

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Reading list
« on: July 04, 2023, 11:16:33 am »
Just got my copy of Hubers New Observations Upon Bees in yesterday. Looking forward to reading it. Planning on reading Honeybee Democracy followed by Keeping Bees With a Smile by Fedor Lazutin after that. Honey From the Earth and The Beeing both by Eric Tourneret & Sylla de Saint Pierre also look good. What books are y'all reading this year, or planning on reading?
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2023, 11:54:36 am »
As a rule, one of the several nonfiction books I'm reading at any given time has to be a bee (or pollinator) book, so I always have one going.  As I mentioned, I'm reading Honeybee Democracy as we speak.  I went secondhand book shopping for my birthday in May, and I found E.O. Wilson's Insect Societies for only $12!  I also found a book called Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation.  I'd never heard of it before, but for a couple of bucks, it was worth a shot, and I'm thinking I'll read that next (after I read another edition of 2 Million Blossoms, which I have all 8 editions of, but now that the magazine is out of print, I'm rationing them).   
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Online Occam

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2023, 01:05:28 pm »
Ooh, those do look interesting to read as well. I don't have nearly the time to read that I'd like but I try to get some in regularly.
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2023, 01:51:16 pm »
I don't have nearly the time to read that I'd like but I try to get some in regularly.
Tell me about it!
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Online Occam

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2023, 02:05:37 pm »
Tell me about it!

I could but it's a long story. It can be summed up by one word however... adulting
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2023, 02:24:16 pm »
I could but it's a long story. It can be summed up by one word however... adulting
My problem is that I'm basically my family's Audible, so whenever there is time to read, I usually end up reading something to someone else instead of reading something by myself.  That and I can't seem to go to bed early enough in the summertime to read before I go to sleep. 
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2023, 12:21:44 am »
I finished Honeybee Democracy.  I would HIGHLY recommend it, not only to beekeepers but to anyone who likes natural literature.  It's just so well written, very personable, but also highly detailed and methodical.  I learned a bunch of new things about swarms.  The only chapter I wasn't crazy about was Chapter 9: The Swarm as a Cognitive Entity.  It just seemed somewhat irrelevant, and the neuroscience was difficult to absorb. 

On to the next book, Bees in America.  :grin:
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2023, 06:58:01 am »
Wisdom of the Hive by Seeley is also very good.   Occam, what did you think of Huber?
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2023, 05:54:56 pm »
Holy cow, this "Bees in America" book is atrocious.  I NEVER, EVER, NEVER don't finish a book.  It can be boring, extremely long, poorly written, and I always finish it.  I can literally count on one hand the books I have started and not finished in my entire lifetime.  But this book is going to be one of them.  And this is the first time I've had it be apparent that I can't finish a book after reading only one chapter.

The reason I always finish a book is that you never know what little good nugget might be hidden in there somewhere.  The problem is this book is so full of all sorts of things that I know aren't true, that I can't trust any word it says.  A few examples.

Pg. 20: "Because English settlers did not recognize or acknowledge Native American agricultural patterns already in place, they fundamentally changed the landscape by bringing cows, bees, apple trees, and even, inadvertently, mice."

Passing over that strange reference to Native American agriculture, while it is true that the house mouse was brought inadvertently to the New World from Europe, it had very little effect on the ecosystem, since there were already mice in the New World.  And while cattle very much affected the West, I can't see how they affected colonial America in any great ecological manner.  (This book was oddly obsessed with referencing cattle frequently, even though it's a completely irrelevant topic.)   

Pg. 23: "Good wives had legal rights in colonial America and had more freedom than nineteenth-century women had.  They often shouldered the responsibilities of farms and shops when men were away at sea or on trips. . . . Certainly, according to scholar David Freeman Hawke, the colonist's wife 'still performed a number of fixed duties as in England . . . .  But her role was no longer limited to household chores . . . she now became her husband's partner in the fields.'  When the English colonies merged with New Amsterdam in 1664, the term good wife  took on even more possibilities because Ditch women had more freedom than English women."

This is a meaningless paragraph.  It analyzes the female workforce of the 1600s as if it's comparable to a more modern era, where women are supposedly not "allowed" to work because women are supposed to only stay at home and do domestic things.  It completely fails to recognize that eking a subsistence living out of the wilderness required all hands on deck just so the family wouldn't starve over the winter, and had nothing to do with what women were or were not "allowed" to do.

Pg. 29: "A Mennonite Quaker from the Rhine Valley named Francis Daniel Pastorius crossed to Pennsylvania in 1683."   

One cannot physically be a Mennonite and Quaker at the same time.  That would be like saying Pastorius was an Episcopalian Mormon.  The two sects are completely unrelated.  Plus Wikipedia says he was a Lutheran.     

 On top of all this, the book is very poorly written.  This is a particularly bad paragraph.
"During the seventeenth century, Africa supplied the world's largest amount of beeswax, although its value was ignored initially in tribal economies.  Ironically, before the Portuguese arrived, many Africans threw beeswax away.  But when Portugal conquered large areas on Africa to provide slaves for their sugar plantations in Brazil, the Africans adopted the word candle for beeswax, kandir.  The Portuguese needed beeswax for two main reasons: church candles and lost-wax molds, which were used to create religious objects and weapons."

All these mildly dubious facts are completely unrelated, especially the sentence about the Africans adopting the Portuguese word for candle.  And I'm fairly sure the lost-wax method of casting can create many more things than religious objects and weapons. 

So to make a long story short, this book was a total bust.  Which is unfortunate because I now don't have a bee book to read.  I do have E.O. Wilson's Insect Societies like I mentioned, but a good bit of that is about ants, and I was really in the mood for something a little lighter and less scientific, since I just finished Seeley.  Does anyone have any recommendations for a bee book that is a light, easier read, perhaps something memoir-ish?     
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline animal

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2023, 09:09:22 pm »
or you could get a red pen and make going through the book more fun ?  :cheesy:
troll reviews of the book ?  :wink:
ought to be some way to get your money's worth ...
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2023, 09:36:28 pm »
or you could get a red pen and make going through the book more fun ?  :cheesy:
I would be marking every single sentence.  That's the point where I call something unreadable.  :grin:

troll reviews of the book ?  :wink:
Not my style.  :cool:

ought to be some way to get your money's worth ...
It was $12 at a local book reseller that I absolutely adore.  I'm perfectly happy giving them $12 for nothing.  I get far more than my money's worth most of the time.  :happy:
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Offline animal

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2023, 09:39:33 pm »
that's awfully mature of you ... and I mean that literally.

.... it's just awful when people choose maturity over fun :cheesy:
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Re: Reading list
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2023, 11:03:12 pm »
Thanks for your review of the book Reagan.

Phillip
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Re: Reading list
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2023, 06:16:32 am »
>The problem is this book is so full of all sorts of things that I know aren't true, that I can't trust any word it says

Your examples show a definite bias towards a specific narrative.  It really is absurd to say "English settlers did not recognize or acknowledge Native American agricultural patterns already in place" when accepting Native American agricultural practices literally saved them from starvation.  All through time woman and men have formed partnerships and struggled through life together.  I'm sure they had no time to analyze just how much freedom women or men had.  They were too busy trying not to starve to argue over who had to do what.  If it needed doing someone did it.  It sounds like a college education once again spreads ignorance.

Have you read Huber?  This is about the research that discovered every useful thing we know about bees except parthenogenesis written by the blind man who discovered all of those facts.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2023, 11:30:35 am »
Have you read Huber?  This is about the research that discovered every useful thing we know about bees except parthenogenesis written by the blind man who discovered all of those facts.
I have not, and it's on my list.  And I may be in the mood for something historical, since I'm kind of getting fed up with the modern books that are trying to push a narrative.  This one is the worst in a string of somewhat disappointing modern pollinator books for me. 
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Re: Reading list
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2023, 07:33:04 pm »
I decided to go with Mark Winston's essays, which I found for a pretty good price on eBay.  I've heard Mark Winston on several podcasts and he is an amazing speaker, and his book "The Biology of the Honey Bee" is one I constantly refer to.   
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Online Occam

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2023, 08:30:24 pm »
Wisdom of the Hive by Seeley is also very good.   Occam, what did you think of Huber?

I need to get some more reading materials together for winter. As for Huber I've quite enjoyed it so far. Fascinating how he was able to make his observations and the lengths he went to and attention he paid to detail to perform his experiments. I've often wondered while reading what I it would have been like to have been performing the experiments through his assistants yet having use of his other senses. What would he have picked up on by hearing or smell they may have initially not caught? I'm about halfway through the book having been slowed down by summer projects on the homestead.
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Offline max2

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2023, 08:49:00 pm »
>The problem is this book is so full of all sorts of things that I know aren't true, that I can't trust any word it says

Your examples show a definite bias towards a specific narrative.  It really is absurd to say "English settlers did not recognize or acknowledge Native American agricultural patterns already in place" when accepting Native American agricultural practices literally saved them from starvation.  All through time woman and men have formed partnerships and struggled through life together.  I'm sure they had no time to analyze just how much freedom women or men had.  They were too busy trying not to starve to argue over who had to do what.  If it needed doing someone did it.  It sounds like a college education once again spreads ignorance.

Have you read Huber?  This is about the research that discovered every useful thing we know about bees except parthenogenesis written by the blind man who discovered all of those facts.

" Huber"!!!
Now there is a real possibility that I'm distant related.
My Grandmother was a " Huber" and my uncle  also was " Huber"...and I'm Swiss born.
Can you point me to some good book by Huber?
I have read bits a pieces.

Offline max2

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2023, 08:50:58 pm »
Bee Culture advertises  " ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture" the newest edition.
It is not available in Australia.
Worth the money ( $US 75) plus about the same in postage?


Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2023, 12:25:52 am »
Can you point me to some good book by Huber?
I have read bits a pieces.
I think the only book of Huber's in print in English currently is the one that the OP has pictured.  I was able to find it on eBay for about $40 recently.  US Amazon has it for about $70.  Here is an Australian vendor, but it's a bit pricier, even considering the exchange rate. 
https://www.booktopia.com.au/huber-s-new-observations-upon-bees-the-complete-volumes-i-ii-francis-huber/book/9781614760566.html
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2023, 10:02:23 am »
Huber wrote a book (in French) on bees in 1792.  He later wrote another volume and published the two volumes together in 1814.  At a later time someone gathered correspondence of Huber together and published "The undedited letters of Huber" in French.  Later in the 1920's C.P Dadant started publishing these letters translated into English.  Dadant also did a more modern English translation.  Since French was his first language and he was a beekeeping writer and editor of the American Bee Journal he was uniquely qualified to do this.  As far as is known, Huber did not write any other books.
https://bushfarms.com/huber.htm
https://www.xstarpublishing.com/#Huber
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Online Ben Framed

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2023, 10:57:20 pm »
I can honestly say that I have yet to read the 'first' bee book. I have found the discussions here at Beemaster very educational, along with some experience I have gained 'by doing' along the way. I consider TheHoneyPump and Van from Arkansas as mentors, both of whom I owe much gratitude and appreciation as well as other members here at Beemaster. I have also learned much from Bob Binnie and other youtube video makers such as David at Barnyard Bees and Jeff Horchoff as well. JP and Schwee are two more which are members here. I could go on and on and thanks to each and every one here who have helped me..

Sincerely,

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« Last Edit: December 06, 2023, 04:17:42 pm by Ben Framed »
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2023, 06:12:43 am »
Also, I suppose I should point out that there is a biography of Huber.  All of these, the two volumes, the letters and the biography are in the currently available Bicentennial edition.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline William Bagwell

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2023, 09:03:42 pm »

" Huber"!!!
Now there is a real possibility that I'm distant related.
My Grandmother was a " Huber" and my uncle  also was " Huber"...and I'm Swiss born.

If you ever search this, I would love to know if Fran?ois Huber is related to Joseph Maria Huber? Different countries, but roughly contemporary.


Offline max2

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2023, 12:44:24 am »
Huber wrote a book (in French) on bees in 1792.  He later wrote another volume and published the two volumes together in 1814.  At a later time someone gathered correspondence of Huber together and published "The undedited letters of Huber" in French.  Later in the 1920's C.P Dadant started publishing these letters translated into English.  Dadant also did a more modern English translation.  Since French was his first language and he was a beekeeping writer and editor of the American Bee Journal he was uniquely qualified to do this.  As far as is known, Huber did not write any other books.
https://bushfarms.com/huber.htm
https://www.xstarpublishing.com/#Huber

Looks like some of Huber's books are available as second hand in OZ.
We have two second hand bookshops in our very litle town ( and one new book store) and i will check there first.
Thanks for the hints.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2023, 09:17:25 pm »
I finished Mark Winston's essays today.  I gave the book a 3/5.  Much of the information was rather outdated and/or relevant mostly to commercial operations and not a hobbyist like myself.  But Winston's writing style is always clear and pleasant, and he had some funny and interesting stories to tell.  Also, his critiques and look-behind-the-curtain essays on the downfalls and challenges of the (then) current university and scientific research environment was very intriguing and enlightening.  It was also amusing (and sometimes a little frightening) to see what the 90s thought of newly emerging technologies and their potential applications.  For example, Winston asks his audience "Who wouldn't want a GMO superbee that could constantly secrete antibiotics and rid the world of foulbrood?", in a tone which assumes that obviously everyone would think that was a great idea.  :shocked: 

Next up is Raising Resilient Bees: Heritage Techniques to Mitigate Mites, Preserve Locally Adapted Genetics, and Grow Your Apiary by Eric and Joy McEwen.  This is a newly released book that I bought after I got an e-mail about a talk the authors were doing for the American Apitherapy Society.  When I learned that a ticket to the online talk was $75 (??!!) and the book was $25, I decided to buy the book instead.     
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Offline animal

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #26 on: December 16, 2023, 12:27:47 pm »
That's not the 90s attitude. It's a human attitude when given a new toy. There were many other attitudes in the 90s that aren't in your book. The times are largely irrelevant because people haven't changed much in thousands of years. You can bet that at the end of the stone age there were "naturalists" griping about others smelting copper. Some of their concerns would have been valid and others comical or horrific. And you can bet some of the cutting edge Chalcolithic tech boys had some bad ideas about the use of copper.
There are always lots of different opinions of how and when to use new tech. There are always those afraid of anything new, and others rushing forward without fear of the possible dangers. Most people are no more enlightened today , than 15,000+ years ago.

A GMO bee delivering antibiotics is an interesting idea. The problems would be in unintended consequences created through not knowing enough about the subject. My guess is that it might be a viable plan in 50 - 100 years at the current rate of development.
In the mean time, we may have to settle for AI Robo-bees delivering nanobots to treat the diseased bees. :tongue: :cheesy:
« Last Edit: December 16, 2023, 12:40:43 pm by animal »
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #27 on: December 16, 2023, 02:40:44 pm »
:cheesy:  Yeah, I didn't mean to imply it was a phenomenon unique to the 90s, or that Winston's comments were indicative of 100% universal acceptance of GMO at the time, I just thought it was an amusing blast from the past. 

The concern with such a plan in my mind would be that constant application of antibiotics would most likely lead to resistance in foulbrood, not permanently cure it. 
« Last Edit: December 16, 2023, 03:13:35 pm by The15thMember »
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Offline animal

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #28 on: December 17, 2023, 12:44:27 pm »
 :cheesy: kinda figured that, but didn't feel like letting it pass  :angry:

After all ....

'Tis the season to be grumpy ... expletive, expletive, expletive,  ex --- ple  --- tive !!! :wink:
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2024, 05:38:53 pm »
Check out my Christmas present from me to me this year!  I found one of your old interns selling it for a great price on eBay, Michael.  :cool: 
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2024, 06:08:48 am »
Then it will have my signature in it.  I reproduced Huber's signature in it too, but it's not his actual autograph... ;)
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2024, 10:44:39 pm »
It doesn't appear to be signed.  I don't know what the person's name was, eBay doesn't let you see that of course, but she messaged me to tell me that she would be a little late in shipping it.  When I told her not to worry about it because it was just a Christmas present I was buying for myself, she told me how she'd done an internship with you and encouraged me to come to Bee Camp and sleep in a teepee.  :grin:
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #32 on: January 05, 2024, 06:55:48 am »
When I sign a book that I didn't write I sign it under "transcriber's note" or if there isn't one (e.g. Dee Lusby's book) I sign it under the publisher name on the copyright page.  Huber's New Observations has a transcriber's note by me, a translator's note by C.P. Dadant, and an author's note by Francis Huber.  I think there is also a note by Pierre Huber at the beginning of the second volume.
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline max2

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2024, 07:13:52 am »
I find " Garden Plants" by Lindtner quite an good introduction to flowers for bees.
Lindtner has done a lot of research and  makes us aware of how climate /flowering/bees/honey are so very inter-connected
Worth a look at.

Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2024, 12:54:07 pm »
When I sign a book that I didn't write I sign it under "transcriber's note" or if there isn't one (e.g. Dee Lusby's book) I sign it under the publisher name on the copyright page.  Huber's New Observations has a transcriber's note by me, a translator's note by C.P. Dadant, and an author's note by Francis Huber.  I think there is also a note by Pierre Huber at the beginning of the second volume.
I checked both places, and this one is definitely not signed.  Maybe she got it before or after she did the internship with you.  *shrug*
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #35 on: January 09, 2024, 07:54:34 am »
Maybe.  If you come to bee camp or to be an intern I'll sign it for you... :)
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline BeeMaster2

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #36 on: January 09, 2024, 02:17:48 pm »
Reagan,
Maybe you can come to BeeFest and get it signed. 😊
Jim Altmiller
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2024, 03:25:52 pm »
Boy, I walked into this one didn't I!  :cheesy:
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2024, 07:32:24 am »
Beefest is closer...
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #39 on: January 10, 2024, 10:21:07 pm »
I don't usually do this, but I'm 30 pages into this book Raising Resilient Bees, and I'm already recommending it to people.  It's exactly what I was looking for, and I can't get enough of it.  It's extremely well written and describes a philosophy of keeping bees that I've been striving toward but was unsure how to reach or even really articulate, and I haven't even learned anything practical from it yet.  I'm just so impressed at the authors' vision and how it aligns with other biodynamic regenerative farming practices like I've learned about from people like Joel Salatin.  I've spent a good portion of the day quoting chunks of it to my family.  Everyone should buy this now.  It's on sale too, so here's the link.  I'm not necessarily kidding.  You can also get it on Amazon.  :happy:  I'll post a full review once I'm finished with it.   
https://www.chelseagreen.com/product/raising-resilient-bees/ 

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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #40 on: January 11, 2024, 08:10:50 am »
"We're trying to ensure the failure of modern beekeeping by focusing too much on single traits; by ignoring the elements of Wildness; and by constantly treating the bees. The biggest mistake of all is to continue viewing mites and other "pests" as enemies that must be destroyed, instead of allies and teachers that are trying to show us a path to a better future. The more virulent a parasite is, the more powerful a tool it can be for improving stocks and practice in the future. All the boring and soul-destroying work of counting mites on sticky boards, killing brood with liquid nitrogen, watching bees groom each other, and measuring brood hormone levels---all done in thousands of replications---will someday be seen as a colossal waste of time when we finally learn to let the Varroa mites do these things for us. My own methods of propagating, selecting and breeding bees, worked out through many years of trial and error, are really just an attempt to establish and utilize Horizontal breeding with honeybees---to create a productive system that preserves and enhances the elements of Wildness. My results are not perfect, but they have enabled me to continue making a living from bees without much stress, and have a positive outlook for the future. I have no doubt that many other beekeepers could easily achieve these same results, and then surpass them."--Kirk Webster, What's missing from the current discussion and work related to bees that's preventing us from making good progress.

https://kirkwebster.com/index.php/whats-missing-from-the-current-discussion-and-work-related-to-bees-thats-preventing-us-from-making-good-progress
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2024, 06:51:53 pm »
So I'm confused about something in this book I'm reading, which I'm still loving by the way.  The authors are discussing their typical hive arrangement and they say this: " . . . we prefer the use of the western shallow box, a variation on the Langstroth hive with a 6 5/8 in. box height."  Isn't that a medium, not a shallow?  Does the fact that they are saying "western" mean something different?   
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #42 on: January 18, 2024, 07:43:06 am »
Box Depths by name and size:
    Jumbo, Dadant Deep: 11 5/8"
    Deep, Langstroth Deep: 9 5/8"
    Western Bee Supply, sometimes Western (ambiguous): 7 5/8"
    Medium, Illinois, 3/4, sometimes Western (ambiguous), in Australia Manley: 6 5/8"
    Shallow: 5 3/4" or 5 11/16"
    Extra Shallow, 1/2 super: 4 3/4" or 4 11/16"
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #43 on: January 27, 2024, 01:57:45 pm »
I finished "Raising Resilient Bees" yesterday, and I am going to qualify my previous gushing somewhat, but I still would highly recommend this book.  The thing that I liked so much about it was it interlocks beekeeping into the regenerative biodynamic permaculture homestead philosophy in a way that was very inspiring and helpful to me on a broad level.  It's in a sense a treatise on a better more sustainable way to keep bees in the modern world, and I found the author's personal goals and philosophy to very much align with my own, which made all the information applicable to me, even though I'm a hobbyist and not a commercial beekeeper. 

That being said, some of the standards set by the authors were unrealistically high.  For example, they were so concerned about their bee products being 100% organic that they don't use paint on their hives for fear a chip of paint might accidentally enter the honey or propolis.  While I applaud their integrity, I'm not anywhere near that concerned about something so minor, but as a beekeeper who has her feet under her already, I could easily weed out what was important to me and what was not from a management perspective.  For this reason though, I wouldn't recommend this book to a beginner, because it would have the potential to make it sound like keeping healthy bees and harvesting quality products from your hives is unattainably difficult, due to the incredibly high standards the authors set for themselves. 

Speaking of which, I really liked how the authors understood their audience and tailored the information toward more experienced beekeepers.  This book is not a "how to" introduction for newbees, and the authors deliberately didn't retread ground they assumed a beekeeping audience already understood, which made the information succinct and straightforward, while still being personal, conversational, and easily readable.  The book also contained some really good up-to-date information on things like the medicinal value of bee products.  And of course, since it's from Chelsea Green, the book is well set up, well bound, and contains lots of great photographs. 

My only other complaints would be the aforementioned confusion about what box size the authors are actually using, because I'm still not sure, and they displayed a contempt toward crystallized honey that was startling to me at times, calling it "ruined" and "foul" in two separate instances.  I understand that commercial honey producers don't like to see crystallized honey, but for a book so interested in natural hive products, this was an out-of-place opinion to be disseminated so strongly.

All that to say, I give it a 5/5, and I'm thinking about implementing some of the authors' suggestions this upcoming season.  For any late-beginner to experienced beekeeper, I would highly recommend it.     
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #44 on: January 29, 2024, 02:38:35 pm »
Good perspective and info Reagan. I have that book in my cart on Amazon currently. I hadn't looked closely enough to see that it was a Chelsea Green book, I do appreciate the way their books are laid out and designed. I have two at home currently I received recently for my birthday, Farming the Woods, and The Resilient Farm and Homestead. I'm looking forward to them and Raising Resilient Bees as well when I pick it up soon.
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Offline The15thMember

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Re: Reading list
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2024, 12:55:05 pm »
My next book is Bumble Bees of North America by Paul Williams, Robbin Thorp, Leif Richardson, and Sheila Colla.  I wanted to brush up on my bumbles before my bumble bee atlas season begins, so I'm going to read it cover to cover. 
I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led.  And through the air, I am she that walks unseen.

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My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm  em portugues:  bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin