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Author Topic: mold in frames  (Read 295 times)

Offline rgennaro

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mold in frames
« on: April 09, 2021, 11:48:14 am »
hi everybody

I am supposed to pick my 2 packages tomorrow. I was given only 2 days notice so yesterday I rushed to clean up the equipment. This hive was out in the field all winter. In the fall there was a small colony which I knew was not going to survive, but I left the hive out just in case they made it.

Yesterday when I opened the hive these two frames had mold in it. They were the most external frames in the bottom box (one on each side) and interestingly the only plastic frames. No other frame has mold on it. I consolidated the best frames in one box. Is it ok to use the other frames and the box? What should I do with these frames?

Thanks for your help as usual.

R

Offline rgennaro

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2021, 11:48:42 am »
here is the other pic

Offline rast

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2021, 12:38:44 pm »
The bees will clean them up.
Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda

Online Ben Framed

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2021, 12:57:15 pm »
I agree that the bees will clean them up. I do have a question. Is the mold and fungus on these frames the same type that causes chalk brood?
For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

Online AR Beekeeper

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2021, 08:35:21 pm »
I don't think that Ascosphaera apis, the fungus that causes Chalkbrood, form a mold on the comb.  My understanding is that it's spores live inside and on the outside of the infected larvae after it dies.  The spores are on the cell walls, but can't be seen with the eye.  The nurse bees get it on their mouth parts and give it to the larvae when they are fed. 

Offline Acebird

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2021, 08:06:42 am »
The first pic is a good frame to start another hive.  The bees will clean out the moldy pollen cells and use the honey for brood.  The second pic I would slice off the extended cells even with all the rest and that could be a good starter frame.
Brian Cardinal
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Offline rgennaro

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Re: mold in frames
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2021, 02:44:50 pm »
Thanks everybody.