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Author Topic: Today I Made  (Read 40400 times)

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #280 on: June 24, 2024, 04:42:04 am »
That?s fine Jim. This is all about making the hive broodless for a while for varroa treatment. My thinking is late summer or autumn (depending n the year) followed by treatment. I will be guided by members advice on this as you guys have the experience in this area.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #281 on: June 24, 2024, 09:33:37 pm »
Thought about cao?s reply and had another slight variation for the drone comb with all starter strips. It will be an interesting experiment trying both styles.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #282 on: June 25, 2024, 06:26:37 pm »
The final part of the queen cage design was to include an access come release door. The thinking was to cage the queen, place the cage on a drone comb and then sit it in a frame cage. After about a week, the queen could be released to lay out the frame. If you look at the first photo, a piece of wire was attached to the door. This wire is then passed through a hole in the frame cage and bent over. To release the queen, the wire is straightened and pushed down. This opens the door without having to remove anything from the hive and saves a lot of time.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #283 on: June 27, 2024, 09:47:59 pm »
I had two more $5 queen excluders that I purchased recently and had a thought about converting those into a frame cage. I wanted to be able to do this by not using basically any extra materials apart from the queen excluders. I was able to cut sides, ends and a base from the two excluders and still have material left over for queen cages if required. Cable ties were used to hold all components together but in thinking about it later on, stainless frame wire could also be used to weave the bits together. A couple of wooden strips and clamps completed the job. All up the cage cost about $12.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #284 on: June 29, 2024, 02:18:25 am »
Woke up last night with a design in my pea sized brain and I had to slap myself for being so dumb. The queen cages that I designed using the excluder material should work well but I would need a bunch of them if all hives were to be made broodless. Construction would take days and I wouldn?t really enjoy spending a whole lot of time making the darn things. Then it hit me. What about using the laser cutter to do the job. It didn?t take long to mock one up and here it is. 3mm ply and everything just pushes together with a couple of spots of glue. Wish the brain was in better order earlier on. When cut out, they only take a minute or so to assemble with a spot of super glue added to each joint. A door could also be made from the same material. I did make one mistake with the design. I made the slots too large. They were 5mm wide but they should be a little narrower than that. The queen could squeeze through them as they stand. My digital vernier had a flat battery so I just had a guess as to what was needed. It?s a simple fix so I?m not worried at this stage. I will test it to see if it fits into the frames that were made a few days ago and make a few adjustments if need be.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #285 on: June 29, 2024, 08:09:06 pm »
Adjustments to the excluder and a simple swing door was designed. Pilot holes were also added to the frame of the cage and the door which made assembly very simple. A bevel was sanded on the top inside edges to allow a swift positioning of the cage within a drone frame.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #286 on: July 03, 2024, 09:29:50 pm »
After experimenting with the laser cutter, I?ve finally figured out a sequence for cutting an isolation cage from 3mm plywood. A good isolation cage can cost up to $120 which is far too much to spend if I need a number of them. The plywood cages will cost between $5 and $6 if I buy a full sheet of ply which will be amazing if they work. I?m quite happy with the design except a couple of areas need a tweak. I?m going to make excluder openings at 4.2 mm which is an average of the spaces in the commercial excluders that I currently have. The other alteration is to reduce the size of the finger joints so that I have more contact points. It will actually make assembly and gluing a little easier. The clips which are made out of galvanised strapping work well and hold everything together. I just had to make sure that some of the holes in the strapping were positioned so that the queen could not escape. The filler blocks that sit next to the top bars have been simplified in design. On earlier designs a rebate was added to go around the end bars. The clips over the top mean that this is no longer needed. Small filler block supports were printed and glued into slots of the excluders. This seams to work very well.  Will post the updated design when I get around to finalising it. If anyone wants a copy of the file, please let me know and I?ll send it to you.

Offline Ben Framed

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #287 on: July 03, 2024, 11:42:37 pm »
Nice work Les..

Phillip

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #288 on: July 04, 2024, 01:32:00 am »
Thanks Phillip. I?m just running an updated version through the laser as we speak. Just trying to get the design right.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #289 on: July 07, 2024, 10:10:40 pm »
A bit of a wet morning here so it was time to get back into the workshop. After making a few frames with starter strips, I decided to make a wooden mould to sit the frames onto  so that I could put a thin guide of beeswax on the end and bottom bars. This tends to ensure that the bees build straight comb and attach it to all sides of the frame. When starter strip frames are placed into a single brood box, quite often the bees don?t draw wax down to the bottom bar which means that you have to be careful when handling the frame. I also tend to wire these frames to increase strength.

The construction process is simple. Cut some flat material such as plywood or MDF and attach it to a larger base. It needs to be at least 19mm thick due to the width of the side bars. Spacer blocks are then glued in place to lift the frame to the appropriate height.
Cling film is then stretched over the mould.

Online Lesgold

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Re: Today I Made
« Reply #290 on: July 07, 2024, 10:14:53 pm »
Wax is then heated and brushed around three sides of the frame. After about 30 seconds, the frame can then be lifted off the mould. At this stage, the cling film is still attached to the wax. The film can then be carefully removed and the frame is ready to be placed into the hive. The cling wrap can be used a few times before being replaced.

 

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